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Hat-trick for mature student graduating with Doctorate degree

Raymond Henderson (53) is today (Tuesday 10th December) graduating for the third time with a doctorate degree in Health Economics (Cost Effectiveness of Personalised Medicine in Cancer Treatment).

Raymond first graduated in 1992 with an undergraduate in Biomedical Sciences before embarking on a career in biotechnology which saw him travel and work around the world including the UK, France and USA.

Raymond returned to his studies in 2014 undertaking a Master’s degree in Stratified Medicine before embarking on a doctorate degree at Queen’s University in 2015.

Raymond says: “I had the privilege of working jointly with Queen’s Management School as well as the Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology. Both the in-house and out-sourced training I received throughout my doctorate is unlike any support I have encountered before, and has prepared me well for the job market.”

Prior to completing his doctorate, Raymond secured the Knowledge Transfer Partnerships (KTP) Associate position of Health Economist at Diaceutics in collaboration with Queen’s University Belfast.

Diaceutics has built a global data lake of diagnostic testing information, curating data from over 2500 labs around the globe.

Raymond added: “The transition from Queen’s to Diaceutics has been smooth, owing to the strong collaboration between the University, the Knowledge Transfer Partnerships team and Diaceutics.

“The opportunities afforded to me during my time at Queen’s and the people with whom I have worked have been spectacular, providing me with the prospect to influence cancer policy across Europe and within the UK. Queen’s has made me feel very welcome as a mature student returning to education, and my age has never been an issue with my supervisors, or amongst my fellow students.

“I hope to continue my career in the exciting field of Health Economics working within precision oncology, where I can put to use my expertise modelling the economic burden of cancers, and evaluating the cost effectiveness of personalised medicine approaches to provide intelligence to the cancer research community, signposting the ways to improve both patient outcomes, as well as NHS efficiencies and savings.”