detail

  • detail

MA (T) Global Security & Borders

Academic Year 2017/18

A programme specification is required for any programme on which a student may be registered. All programmes of the University are subject to the University's Quality Assurance and Enhancement processes as set out in the DASA Policies and Procedures Manual.

Programme Title

MA (T) Global Security & Borders

Final Award
(exit route if applicable for Postgraduate Taught Programmes)

Master of Arts

Programme Code

INT-MA-GS

UCAS Code

JACS Code

L250 (DESCR) 100

Criteria for Admissions

Normally a 2.1 Honours degree or above, or equivalent recognised qualification in a Social Sciences, Humanities or Arts subject, or a 2.1 Honours degree or above, or equivalent recognised qualification in any subject with/or relevant professional experience.

ATAS Clearance Required

No

Health Check Required

No

Portfolio Required

Interview Required

Places available: 12 Shortlisted applicants for the programme will be interviewed by a panel comprising the Programme Convenor, and, one or more other members of the School's academic staff.

Mode of Study

Full Time

Type of Programme

Postgraduate

Length of Programme

1 Academic Year(s)

Total Credits for Programme

180

Exit Awards available

INSTITUTE INFORMATION

Awarding Institution/Body

Queen's University Belfast

Teaching Institution

Queen's University Belfast

School/Department

History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics

Framework for Higher Education Qualification Level 
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/publications/information-and-guidance

Level 7

QAA Benchmark Group
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/assuring-standards-and-quality/the-quality-code/subject-benchmark-statements

N/A

Accreditations (PSRB)

External Examiner Name:

External Examiner Institution/Organisation

Dr Columba Peoples

University of Bristol

REGULATION INFORMATION

Does the Programme have any approved exemptions from the University General Regulations
(Please see General Regulations)

No

Programme Specific Regulations

General University Regulations apply at all Stages

Students with protected characteristics

N/A

Are students subject to Fitness to Practise Regulations

(Please see General Regulations)

No

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF PROGRAMME

Intellectual Aims: this programme will give students the opportunity to:
 develop advanced knowledge and understanding of the core theories, concepts, issues, debates and case studies in Critical Security Studies and Border Studies – emerging fields in the discipline of International Relations;
 think relationally about global security and borders: how pressing issues of global security are revealed most clearly in the operation of borders (i.e. excluding risks and threats), and how borders expose the fundamental contingency of state sovereignty and the international system (i.e. borders must be continually performed);
 identify and develop their own intellectual interests in global security and borders, and refine those interests within an academic framework and through empirical workplace experience;

Skills Development Aims: this programme will give students the opportunity to:
 develop and consolidate core intellectual skills (e.g. managing and prioritizing knowledge, analytical thinking, critical and independent thinking);
 develop and consolidate career development skills (e.g. written and oral communication, time management, teamwork and collaboration, managing conflict);
 develop and consolidate organizational skills (e.g. efficient and effective work practice; goal setting and strategic planning)
 develop and consolidate management skills (e.g. delegation, decision-making, project management)
 develop and consolidate professional skills (e.g. navigating institutional regulations, working in a professional environment)
 develop and consolidate personal development skills (e.g. networking, initiative, independence, leadership, entrepreneurial thinking)
 progress their learning in ways that develop and consolidate critical thinking and independent research skills, especially through the Borders Internship and the MA Dissertation

Impact Aims: this programme will give students the opportunity to:
 understand how their learning, knowledge and understanding equips them to intervene in current debates about global security and borders;
 contribute to academic impact by shaping key intellectual debates in International Relations, Critical Security Studies and Border Studies;
 contribute to public impact by demonstrating how security and borders constitute some of our most pressing global challenges (e.g. migration, terrorism, conflict, nationalism, privacy, multiculturalism);
 manage their own personal impact by implementing their intellectual, career development, organizational, management, professional and personal development skills in active seminar-based learning, through peer engagement and on an internship placement.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Learning Outcomes: Cognitive Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Develop advanced analytical, reasoning, literacy and communication skills.

Solve problems, process and prioritize a wide variety of information, and express sophisticated arguments and positions in oral and written form.

Enhance their knowledge of relevant methodological and theoretical approaches to key issue areas relating to global security and borders.

Identify and articulate advanced level arguments relating to global security and borders in oral and written form.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Opportunities to develop advanced analytical, reasoning, literacy and communication skills will occur throughout the programme on taught modules, through independent study and on the Borders Internship.
Opportunities to develop problem solving and information processing strategies, as well as general methodological and theoretical approaches, will occur throughout the programme on taught modules, through independent study, and on the Borders Internship.

Self-reflection and evaluation will further enhance the critical thinking, sound judgement and independence of the student, and will be central to all modules. The discursive nature of seminar-based discussion allows for tutors to assess individual student progression and understanding, and adjust their teaching accordingly.

The student will enhance their skills and confidence through oral and written assignments, discussion groups, team tasks, and independent research, as well as through the Borders Internship.

Methods of Assessment

These advanced cognitive skills will be assessed by a variety of traditional and innovative methods including essay, learning log (internship), briefing paper (internship), and MA dissertation.

Learning Outcomes: Knowledge & Understanding

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

• engage in relational thinking by acknowledging how pressing issues of global security are revealed most clearly in the operation of borders, and how borders expose the contingency of state sovereignty and the international system
• demonstrate an advanced awareness and understanding of the foundations of Critical Security Studies and Border Studies within International Relations;
• understand how Critical Security Studies and Border Studies relate to different theoretical approaches to global security and borders within International Relations; acknowledge the diversity of critical approaches and identify key tensions between them;
• recognise the interdisciplinary influences on Critical Security Studies and Border Studies and acknowledge how these inform its development;
• understand how critical theories of global security and borders translate into different practices at border sites, even when those sites are radically dispersed;
• apply contemporary academic debates about global security and borders to contemporary bordering practices;
• critically engage in debates on key developments in the politics of global security and borders;
• reflect upon the ethical and political implications and developments in global security and borders;
• engage in depth with a wide range of key issues in a theoretically informed way;
• pursue independent, creative and critical thinking through both written work and group debate and discussions

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The teaching methods used to embed this knowledge and understanding include formal lectures and small group tutorials and seminars, many of which will be enhanced by learning aids such as power point presentations, video and role play. Students will also benefit from more innovative methods including one-on-one mentoring and cohort group work in the ‘Critical Security Studies in Action’ Workshop. More individualized opportunities to facilitate independent learning are developed through academic and work-place mentoring and supervision (e.g. peer mentoring, dissertation supervision; Borders Internship).

Methods of Assessment

A variety of traditional methods will be used to assess students, including essays with pre-set and formatively developed questions, as well as the MA dissertation. The programme also develops innovative methods of assessment including a reflexive learning log and a project-oriented briefing paper to benefit the host institution (Borders Internship).

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

• understand of the key and evolving debates in Critical Security Studies and Border Studies
• critically engage with arguments relating to global security and borders, including contemporary bordering practices, the ethical and political implications of efforts to increase the security of borders; and moments where border security fails

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The teaching methods used to embed this knowledge and understanding include formal lectures and small group tutorials and seminars, many of which will be enhanced by learning aids such as power point presentations, video and role play. Students will also benefit from more innovative methods including one-on-one mentoring and cohort group work in the ‘Critical Security Studies in Action’ Workshop. More individualized opportunities to facilitate independent learning are developed through academic and work-place mentoring and supervision (e.g. peer mentoring, dissertation supervision; Borders Internship).

The key subject-specific skills embedded in the programme are:

Intellectual skills
• Managing & prioritizing knowledge
• Analytical thinking
• Critical & independent thinking
• Effective judgement
• Reflexive evaluation

Career development skills
• Communication and presentation (oral and written)
• Teamwork and collaboration
• Time management
• Respecting diverse arguments
• Self-reflexivity and confidence building
• Managing conflict
• Information technology
Organizational skills
• Efficient and effective work practice
• Clear organisation and presentation of information
• Goal-setting and strategic planning

Methods of Assessment

A variety of traditional methods will be used to assess students, including essays with pre-set and formatively developed questions, as well as the MA dissertation. The programme also develops innovative methods of assessment including a reflexive learning log and a project-oriented briefing paper to benefit the host institution (Borders Internship).

Learning Outcomes: Transferable Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Acquire and develop advanced subject-specific skills, as well as organizational, professional and career development skills that will be beneficial in further research, education and employment.
One of the MA’s core modules – the double-weighted PAI7097 Borders Internship – is key to providing transferable skills relating to employment. It has two main components:

• Students will take an intensive 3 day ‘Critical Security Studies In Action’ workshop in Week 2, Semester 2, which will provide wide-ranging preparation for their on-site internship including the introduction of appropriate research methods, an opportunity to hear honest reflections from experienced researchers in the field, engagement in active learning through group work, and strategies for troubleshooting any difficulties arising from the site-based internship. The workshop will be facilitated by the MA convenor in conjunction with resident and international experts in global security and borders and PhD students currently doing research in the field.
• Students will undertake a dedicated 10 week site-specific Borders Internship at a non-HE institution for 3 days a week for 10 weeks (from weeks 3-12). These host institutions are both governmental and non-governmental (3rd sector), and all are directly engaged in the work of global security and borders. The confirmed host institutions for the borders internship, and number of places for 2016-2017, are following:

 Irish Customs, Dublin International Airport: 1 internship
 Irish Customs, Dublin Port: 1 internship
 North-South Ministerial Council, Armagh: 1 internship
 Cybersecurity Unit, PSNI: 2 internships
 The Migrant Centre, Northern Ireland: 3 internships
 Northern Ireland Council for Ethnic Minorities: 3 internships
 QUB International Student Support: 1 internship
 TOTAL for 2016-17 intake: 12 internship positions

In addition, we are also cultivating a number of additional host institutions for future internship positions including Belfast International Airport; Belfast City Airport; Belfast Harbour; Belfast Harbour Police; Northern Ireland Strategic Migration Partnership and the British-Irish Intergovernmental Council Joint Secretariat

To ensure that the learning outcomes on the programme are met, the Borders Internship module will provide the following additional assurances:

• A fair and transparent allocation of internships to students involving the student’s preferences, student ranking by entrance grades and achievement, and an interview with relevant staff (October)
• A comprehensive model of supervision and monitoring (see next column) including regular one-on-one meetings with an academic supervisor, peer group mentoring and dedicated on-site supervision by a host mentor
• A dedicated effort, by the course convenor, to ensure that all visas for Tier 4 students undertaking internships in the Republic of Ireland are acquired in advance
• A concentrated effort by the course convenor and host mentor to ensure that any required security clearances are undertaken in advance of the internship starting
• A comprehensive risk policy to ensure that alternative arrangements can be made if an internship does not work out, runs into difficulty or breaks down.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The MA in Global Security and Borders enables postgraduate students to develop a broad portfolio of skills which will enhance their employability and/or provide them with a sound basis for progression to further research at doctoral level or elsewhere. The student will develop skills through engagement with module content, seminar discussions, independent learning, presentations, debate and discussion, informal networking with peers, expert mentorship, supervision and one-on-one mentorship.
The Borders Internship is central to the programme’s delivery of transferable skills in that it builds on, enhances and develops core intellectual skills that the students will gain from their academic study. It will give students the opportunity to ‘apply’ relevant concepts and analytical processes, and experience how global security and borders operate in a ‘real world’ context.

The Borders Internship will consolidate the following subject-specific skills (see above):

Career Development skills:
• Communication & presentation (oral & written)
• Teamwork & collaboration
• Time Management
• Self-Reflection & confidence building
• Managing conflict
• Using information technology

Organizational skills:
• Efficient & effective work practice
• Clear organisation and presentation of information
• Goal setting & strategic planning

The Borders Internship will develop and consolidate the following transferable skills:
Management skills
• Managing & prioritizing assigned tasks
• Delegation
• Decision making
• Project management and completion

Professional skills
• Navigating institutional regulations & standards
• Working in a professional environment

Personal Development skills
• Networking
• Initiative
• Independence
• Creativity
• Leadership
• Entrepreneurial thinking

To ensure that subject-specific and transferable skills are delivered to students, the programme has a comprehensive supervisory structure in place:

• Academic Supervision: Each intern will have an academic supervisor based at QUB who will advise on the requisite assessment and provide pastoral support. Students will meet individually with supervisors for 30 mins every 2 weeks throughout the semester (weeks 4, 6, 8, 10 & 12) to discuss progress and plan for the assessments. Supervisors will also arrange 2 one-hour structured group supervisions throughout the semester (weeks 6 & 10) to enhance peer engagement, feedback and learning

• Host Mentor: Each Intern will have a mentor / supervisor based at the host institution who will assign discrete tasks, arrange any specific training, and provide guidance for the topic of the student ‘briefing paper’. Host mentors will meet interns in the first and last weeks for 30 mins (week 3 for settling in, week 12 for evaluation). All other weeks they will have an initial meeting for 15 minutes to specify tasks for the week ahead.

Methods of Assessment

Interns will be assessed through coursework consisting of a Learning Log (20%) detailing the skills development on the internship, a Briefing Paper (20%) focusing on a specific aspect of the internship as advised by the host mentor, and an Academic Paper (60%). All assessments will be marked and moderated by academics at QUB.

MODULE INFORMATION

Programme Requirements

Module Title

Module Code

Level/ stage

Credits

Availability

Duration

Pre-requisite

 

Assessment

 

 

 

 

S1

S2

 

 

Core

Option

Coursework %

Practical %

Examination %

Dissertation

PAI9099

7

60

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Approaches to Research Design

PAI7001

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Global Terrorism

PAI7007

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

The Politics of the Republic of Ireland

PAI7022

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

40%

0%

60%

Conflict Intervention

PAI7027

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

International Political Economy

PAI7030

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Gender, Politics and Democracy

PAI7032

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Philosophy of Conflict and War

PHL7038

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Carbon Literacy for a Low Carbon Society and Economy

PAI7036

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Ethnic conflict and consensus

PAI7050

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Contemporary Security

PAI7051

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Institutions and Politics of the European Union

PAI7052

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Global Borders and Security Internship

PAI7037

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Borders Internship

PAI7097

7

40

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Global Ethics

PAI7056

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Notes