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Cert (PC) Human Rights & Criminal Jusitice

Academic Year 2017/18

A programme specification is required for any programme on which a student may be registered. All programmes of the University are subject to the University's Quality Assurance and Enhancement processes as set out in the DASA Policies and Procedures Manual.

Programme Title

Cert (PC) Human Rights & Criminal Jusitice

Final Award
(exit route if applicable for Postgraduate Taught Programmes)

Postgraduate Certificate

Programme Code

LAW-PC-HC

UCAS Code

JACS Code

M100 (DESCR) 100

Criteria for Admissions

Normally a 2.1 Honours degree or above or equivalent recognised qualification in Law, Social Sciences, Humanities, or a cognate discipline.
Applicants who are non-EAA nationals must satisfy the UKBA immigration requirements for English language for visa purposes, by providing evidence of an IELTS score of 6.5 (taken within the last two years), with not less than 5.5 in any component, or an equivalent qualification acceptable to the University.

ATAS Clearance Required

No

Health Check Required

No

Portfolio Required

Interview Required

Mode of Study

Full Time

Type of Programme

Postgraduate

Length of Programme

1 Academic Year(s)

Total Credits for Programme

180

Exit Awards available

INSTITUTE INFORMATION

Awarding Institution/Body

Queen's University Belfast

Teaching Institution

Queen's University Belfast

School/Department

Law

Framework for Higher Education Qualification Level 
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/publications/information-and-guidance

Level 7

QAA Benchmark Group
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/assuring-standards-and-quality/the-quality-code/subject-benchmark-statements

Law (2015)

Accreditations (PSRB)

External Examiner Name:

External Examiner Institution/Organisation

Professor Tom Obokata (Human Rights)

Keele University

Dr Aogan Mulcahy (Criminal Justice)

University College Dublin

REGULATION INFORMATION

Does the Programme have any approved exemptions from the University General Regulations
(Please see General Regulations)

No

Programme Specific Regulations

The Postgraduate Certificate is an exit award only. It is awarded to students who have successfully completed taught modules worth 60 credits from those modules available on the LLM programme.

Progression:
Students may only re-sit failed or deferred modules totalling 60 CATS points in the Supplementary examination period (ie August). Other fails must be re-taken in the following academic year.

Students with protected characteristics

TBC

Are students subject to Fitness to Practise Regulations

(Please see General Regulations)

No

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF PROGRAMME

The programme aims to enable the learner to master the complex and specialised areas of international human rights law and criminal justice.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Learning Outcomes: Cognitive Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Deal with complex issues in a systematic and coherent manner.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Instruction in the use of the university Library and the QUB Online information system are core elements of the induction process. Coursework (in the form of essay writing) comprises a central element of the overall Masters learning and teaching process thus facilitating the development of practical research, presentational and IT skills. Students are encouraged to attend the many staff seminars and guest lectures organised throughout the year which include nationally and internationally renowned speakers. Students are required to take a module in research methods which equips them with an understanding of theories of research and research methodologies. Students are introduced to the wide range of source material on the Internet and are guided in the use of this material to develop skills of critical analysis.

Methods of Assessment

Coursework (in the form of essay writing), short papers, and class presentations will comprise a central element of the overall assessment process. Assessment processes will be aimed at assessing students understanding of key legal concepts, the nature of key interdisciplinary debates, the application of legal concepts to complex and uncertain policy and regulatory scenarios, and their ability to apply key socio-legal research methodologies to the subject matter.

Presentation of independent research both orally and in writing to both a specialist and non-specialist audience.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Instruction in the use of the university Library and the QUB Online information system are core elements of the induction process. Coursework (in the form of essay writing) comprises a central element of the overall Masters learning and teaching process thus facilitating the development of practical research, presentational and IT skills. Students are encouraged to attend the many staff seminars and guest lectures organised throughout the year which include nationally and internationally renowned speakers. Students are required to take a module in research methods which equips them with an understanding of theories of research and research methodologies. Students are introduced to the wide range of source material on the Internet and are guided in the use of this material to develop skills of critical analysis.

Methods of Assessment

Coursework (in the form of essay writing), short papers, and class presentations will comprise a central element of the overall assessment process. Assessment processes will be aimed at assessing students understanding of key legal concepts, the nature of key interdisciplinary debates, the application of legal concepts to complex and uncertain policy and regulatory scenarios, and their ability to apply key socio-legal research methodologies to the subject matter.

Apply key research skills and methodology to a range of sources including not only legal ones but also media and other discussions of law such as NGO position papers.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Instruction in the use of the university Library and the QUB Online information system are core elements of the induction process. Coursework (in the form of essay writing) comprises a central element of the overall Masters learning and teaching process thus facilitating the development of practical research, presentational and IT skills. Students are encouraged to attend the many staff seminars and guest lectures organised throughout the year which include nationally and internationally renowned speakers. Students are required to take a module in research methods which equips them with an understanding of theories of research and research methodologies. Students are introduced to the wide range of source material on the Internet and are guided in the use of this material to develop skills of critical analysis.

Methods of Assessment

Coursework (in the form of essay writing), short papers, and class presentations will comprise a central element of the overall assessment process. Assessment processes will be aimed at assessing students understanding of key legal concepts, the nature of key interdisciplinary debates, the application of legal concepts to complex and uncertain policy and regulatory scenarios, and their ability to apply key socio-legal research methodologies to the subject matter.

Critically present information and ideas in a coherent and accurate manner.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Instruction in the use of the university Library and the QUB Online information system are core elements of the induction process. Coursework (in the form of essay writing) comprises a central element of the overall Masters learning and teaching process thus facilitating the development of practical research, presentational and IT skills. Students are encouraged to attend the many staff seminars and guest lectures organised throughout the year which include nationally and internationally renowned speakers. Students are required to take a module in research methods which equips them with an understanding of theories of research and research methodologies. Students are introduced to the wide range of source material on the Internet and are guided in the use of this material to develop skills of critical analysis.

Methods of Assessment

Coursework (in the form of essay writing), short papers, and class presentations will comprise a central element of the overall assessment process. Assessment processes will be aimed at assessing students understanding of key legal concepts, the nature of key interdisciplinary debates, the application of legal concepts to complex and uncertain policy and regulatory scenarios, and their ability to apply key socio-legal research methodologies to the subject matter.

Learning Outcomes: Transferable Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

An ability to be self-directed and exercise initiative

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Verbal communication skills are developed primarily through small group seminar teaching, in particular by means of student presentations Written communication skills are developed through the programme through essay writing. Methods of assessment, which require the development of arguments based on the presentation and/or generation of numerical and statistical information, aid the development of numeracy skills. The process of independent study that underlines the entire programme of study, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on essays, facilitate the development of autonomy and personal skills – in addition to how this manifests itself at undergraduate level, postgraduates will also be able to exercise initiative, self-direction and personal responsibility. Problem-solving and teamwork skills are developed principally through specific problem-based seminar exercises and projects that require collaboration amongst groups of students. General time-management and intellectual skills are also developed through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB Online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word-processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and teaching process.

Methods of Assessment

The assessment of the majority of key transferable skills forms an integral part of the overall assessment of the programme; however the approach to assessment varies within modules. Written communication skills, problem-solving and intellectual skills are assessed directly throughout the programme. Autonomy, teamwork and personal skills are generally assessed indirectly through the medium of coursework. Verbal communication skills are assessed through the use of student presentations which are a requirement for several modules.

The independent learning skills required for workplace training or further professional training

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Verbal communication skills are developed primarily through small group seminar teaching, in particular by means of student presentations Written communication skills are developed through the programme through essay writing. Methods of assessment, which require the development of arguments based on the presentation and/or generation of numerical and statistical information, aid the development of numeracy skills. The process of independent study that underlines the entire programme of study, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on essays, facilitate the development of autonomy and personal skills – in addition to how this manifests itself at undergraduate level, postgraduates will also be able to exercise initiative, self-direction and personal responsibility. Problem-solving and teamwork skills are developed principally through specific problem-based seminar exercises and projects that require collaboration amongst groups of students. General time-management and intellectual skills are also developed through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB Online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word-processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and teaching process.

Methods of Assessment

The assessment of the majority of key transferable skills forms an integral part of the overall assessment of the programme; however the approach to assessment varies within modules. Written communication skills, problem-solving and intellectual skills are assessed directly throughout the programme. Autonomy, teamwork and personal skills are generally assessed indirectly through the medium of coursework. Verbal communication skills are assessed through the use of student presentations which are a requirement for several modules.

Independent and critical thinking

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Verbal communication skills are developed primarily through small group seminar teaching, in particular by means of student presentations Written communication skills are developed through the programme through essay writing. Methods of assessment, which require the development of arguments based on the presentation and/or generation of numerical and statistical information, aid the development of numeracy skills. The process of independent study that underlines the entire programme of study, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on essays, facilitate the development of autonomy and personal skills – in addition to how this manifests itself at undergraduate level, postgraduates will also be able to exercise initiative, self-direction and personal responsibility. Problem-solving and teamwork skills are developed principally through specific problem-based seminar exercises and projects that require collaboration amongst groups of students. General time-management and intellectual skills are also developed through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB Online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word-processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and teaching process.

Methods of Assessment

The assessment of the majority of key transferable skills forms an integral part of the overall assessment of the programme; however the approach to assessment varies within modules. Written communication skills, problem-solving and intellectual skills are assessed directly throughout the programme. Autonomy, teamwork and personal skills are generally assessed indirectly through the medium of coursework. Verbal communication skills are assessed through the use of student presentations which are a requirement for several modules.

Decision-making skills

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Verbal communication skills are developed primarily through small group seminar teaching, in particular by means of student presentations Written communication skills are developed through the programme through essay writing. Methods of assessment, which require the development of arguments based on the presentation and/or generation of numerical and statistical information, aid the development of numeracy skills. The process of independent study that underlines the entire programme of study, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on essays, facilitate the development of autonomy and personal skills – in addition to how this manifests itself at undergraduate level, postgraduates will also be able to exercise initiative, self-direction and personal responsibility. Problem-solving and teamwork skills are developed principally through specific problem-based seminar exercises and projects that require collaboration amongst groups of students. General time-management and intellectual skills are also developed through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB Online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word-processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and teaching process.

Methods of Assessment

The assessment of the majority of key transferable skills forms an integral part of the overall assessment of the programme; however the approach to assessment varies within modules. Written communication skills, problem-solving and intellectual skills are assessed directly throughout the programme. Autonomy, teamwork and personal skills are generally assessed indirectly through the medium of coursework. Verbal communication skills are assessed through the use of student presentations which are a requirement for several modules.

Ability to apply existing knowledge to new situations

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Verbal communication skills are developed primarily through small group seminar teaching, in particular by means of student presentations Written communication skills are developed through the programme through essay writing. Methods of assessment, which require the development of arguments based on the presentation and/or generation of numerical and statistical information, aid the development of numeracy skills. The process of independent study that underlines the entire programme of study, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on essays, facilitate the development of autonomy and personal skills – in addition to how this manifests itself at undergraduate level, postgraduates will also be able to exercise initiative, self-direction and personal responsibility. Problem-solving and teamwork skills are developed principally through specific problem-based seminar exercises and projects that require collaboration amongst groups of students. General time-management and intellectual skills are also developed through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB Online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word-processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and teaching process.

Methods of Assessment

The assessment of the majority of key transferable skills forms an integral part of the overall assessment of the programme; however the approach to assessment varies within modules. Written communication skills, problem-solving and intellectual skills are assessed directly throughout the programme. Autonomy, teamwork and personal skills are generally assessed indirectly through the medium of coursework. Verbal communication skills are assessed through the use of student presentations which are a requirement for several modules.

The ability to absorb new techniques in areas such as information technology

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Verbal communication skills are developed primarily through small group seminar teaching, in particular by means of student presentations Written communication skills are developed through the programme through essay writing. Methods of assessment, which require the development of arguments based on the presentation and/or generation of numerical and statistical information, aid the development of numeracy skills. The process of independent study that underlines the entire programme of study, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on essays, facilitate the development of autonomy and personal skills – in addition to how this manifests itself at undergraduate level, postgraduates will also be able to exercise initiative, self-direction and personal responsibility. Problem-solving and teamwork skills are developed principally through specific problem-based seminar exercises and projects that require collaboration amongst groups of students. General time-management and intellectual skills are also developed through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB Online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word-processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and teaching process.

Methods of Assessment

The assessment of the majority of key transferable skills forms an integral part of the overall assessment of the programme; however the approach to assessment varies within modules. Written communication skills, problem-solving and intellectual skills are assessed directly throughout the programme. Autonomy, teamwork and personal skills are generally assessed indirectly through the medium of coursework. Verbal communication skills are assessed through the use of student presentations which are a requirement for several modules.

Learning Outcomes: Knowledge & Understanding

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Detailed knowledge and critical understanding of the development of legal standards concerning the promotion and protection of human rights and the enhancement of criminal justice around the world.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Students’ acquisition of core knowledge is achieved primarily through independent study, systematically supported by lectures, seminars and the provision of online information.

Methods of Assessment

Coursework (essays), class presentations and case reports.

Detailed Knowledge and critical understanding of the methods employed for ensuring adherence to international human rights and criminal justice standards.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Students’ acquisition of core knowledge is achieved primarily through independent study, systematically supported by lectures, seminars and the provision of online information.

Methods of Assessment

Coursework (essays), class presentations and case reports.

The ability to demonstrate detailed knowledge and critical understanding of a wide range of factors which impact on the protection of human rights and the enhancement of criminal justice.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Students’ acquisition of core knowledge is achieved primarily through independent study, systematically supported by lectures, seminars and the provision of online information.

Methods of Assessment

Coursework (essays), class presentations and case reports.

Critical Understanding of the wider legal, political, economic and social contexts in which international human rights law and criminal justice systems operate.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Students’ acquisition of core knowledge is achieved primarily through independent study, systematically supported by lectures, seminars and the provision of online information.

Methods of Assessment

Coursework (essays), class presentations and case reports.

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Ability to identify human rights problems and criminal justice issues and analyse them from a legal point of view.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The focus of postgraduate level teaching and assessment is on facilitating independent study. The basic information is covered in lectures and smaller group contact time. Students build on this basis by using their generic legal research skills to acquire subject specific knowledge through the use of guided reading lists and electronic resources such as Lexis, Westlaw and Queens-Online.

Methods of Assessment

Each module assessment is designed not only to test subject specific skills taught in that module but also to map the entrenchment of generic legal research skills. Assessment methods include long essays (written coursework), presentations and short papers. Assessment for postgraduate modules is more rigorous in terms of quality, rigor and length than undergraduate assessment.

Ability to critically evaluate proposed solutions to human rights problems and criminal justice issues and their theoretical and methodological bases.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The focus of postgraduate level teaching and assessment is on facilitating independent study. The basic information is covered in lectures and smaller group contact time. Students build on this basis by using their generic legal research skills to acquire subject specific knowledge through the use of guided reading lists and electronic resources such as Lexis, Westlaw and Queens-Online.

Methods of Assessment

Each module assessment is designed not only to test subject specific skills taught in that module but also to map the entrenchment of generic legal research skills. Assessment methods include long essays (written coursework), presentations and short papers. Assessment for postgraduate modules is more rigorous in terms of quality, rigor and length than undergraduate assessment.

Synthesising information from extra-legal sources in order to place information relating to human rights problems and criminal justice issues in its social, political and economic context.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The focus of postgraduate level teaching and assessment is on facilitating independent study. The basic information is covered in lectures and smaller group contact time. Students build on this basis by using their generic legal research skills to acquire subject specific knowledge through the use of guided reading lists and electronic resources such as Lexis, Westlaw and Queens-Online.

Methods of Assessment

Each module assessment is designed not only to test subject specific skills taught in that module but also to map the entrenchment of generic legal research skills. Assessment methods include long essays (written coursework), presentations and short papers. Assessment for postgraduate modules is more rigorous in terms of quality, rigor and length than undergraduate assessment.

Ability to critically evaluate current research in the field of human rights and criminal justice.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The focus of postgraduate level teaching and assessment is on facilitating independent study. The basic information is covered in lectures and smaller group contact time. Students build on this basis by using their generic legal research skills to acquire subject specific knowledge through the use of guided reading lists and electronic resources such as Lexis, Westlaw and Queens-Online.

Methods of Assessment

Each module assessment is designed not only to test subject specific skills taught in that module but also to map the entrenchment of generic legal research skills. Assessment methods include long essays (written coursework), presentations and short papers. Assessment for postgraduate modules is more rigorous in terms of quality, rigor and length than undergraduate assessment.

Using arguments derived from the analysis of current research to present new hypotheses.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The focus of postgraduate level teaching and assessment is on facilitating independent study. The basic information is covered in lectures and smaller group contact time. Students build on this basis by using their generic legal research skills to acquire subject specific knowledge through the use of guided reading lists and electronic resources such as Lexis, Westlaw and Queens-Online.

Methods of Assessment

Each module assessment is designed not only to test subject specific skills taught in that module but also to map the entrenchment of generic legal research skills. Assessment methods include long essays (written coursework), presentations and short papers. Assessment for postgraduate modules is more rigorous in terms of quality, rigor and length than undergraduate assessment.

Ability to demonstrate linkages between different bodies of knowledge relating to human rights and criminal justice by recognising the presence of underpinning legal concepts.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The focus of postgraduate level teaching and assessment is on facilitating independent study. The basic information is covered in lectures and smaller group contact time. Students build on this basis by using their generic legal research skills to acquire subject specific knowledge through the use of guided reading lists and electronic resources such as Lexis, Westlaw and Queens-Online.

Methods of Assessment

Each module assessment is designed not only to test subject specific skills taught in that module but also to map the entrenchment of generic legal research skills. Assessment methods include long essays (written coursework), presentations and short papers. Assessment for postgraduate modules is more rigorous in terms of quality, rigor and length than undergraduate assessment.

MODULE INFORMATION

Programme Requirements

Module Title

Module Code

Level/ stage

Credits

Availability

Duration

Pre-requisite

 

Assessment

 

 

 

 

S1

S2

 

 

Core

Option

Coursework %

Practical %

Examination %

Criminal Justice Processes

LAW8211

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Criminology and Criminal Justice Methods 1

LAW8258

7

5

YES

2 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Criminology and Criminal Justice Methods 2

LAW8259

7

5

YES

2 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Key Debates in Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

AHS7001

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Crime, Justice and Society

LAW8311

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Theoretical Criminology

LAW8312

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice

LAW8313

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Transitional Justice

LAW8314

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Equality and Discrimination

LAW8317

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Counter-terrorism and Human Rights

LAW8319

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Comparative Human Rights

LAW8321

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

International Human Rights Law

LAW8315

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Approaches to Legal Research

LAW8322

7

10

YES

4 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Theories and Methods of Human Rights

LAW8331

7

10

YES

4 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Notes

Students must take AHS7001, LAW8315 and LAW8322; students must take one of the following: LAW8211 or LAW8312; students must take either LAW8258 and LAW8259 OR LAW8331