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Cert (PC) Non - Medical Prescribing

Academic Year 2017/18

A programme specification is required for any programme on which a student may be registered. All programmes of the University are subject to the University's Quality Assurance and Enhancement processes as set out in the DASA Policies and Procedures Manual.

Programme Title

Cert (PC) Non - Medical Prescribing

Final Award
(exit route if applicable for Postgraduate Taught Programmes)

Postgraduate Certificate

Programme Code

NAM-PC-NP

UCAS Code

JACS Code

B790 (DESCR) 100

Criteria for Admissions

Applicants must satisfy the University’s general entry requirements and specific requirements for the course are detailed below:

This programme is available at postgraduate (Level 7) to take account of the professional and academic background and achievement in the target population. Those studying at postgraduate level are expected to demonstrate a level of understanding consistent with the level of study being undertaken.

Applicants must have:

Students entering this programme normally have successfully completed a Degree or equivalent.
and

Be entered on the NMC Professional Register as a First level Registered Nurse or Midwife.
and

Have a specialist level of knowledge in their area of practice as shown by one of:

1. a Community Nursing qualification
2. a Specialist Nursing qualification
3. three years clinical experience including one year in the area in which they will prescribe and additional education relevant to their area of practice.
and

4. Be declared competent in health assessment by employer, or have successfully completed a module in Health Assessment.
Or

5. Be registered concurrently on the module Health Assessment.

The following admissions criteria have also been stipulated by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) (Directly from Standard 1.1 Standards for admission to programmes to be awarded, a ‘qualification to prescribe’ (2006) as follows:

Prior to acceptance onto the programme, employers must ensure that:

Nurse prescriber candidates must be a registered first level nurse, midwife and/or specialist community public health nurse (and therefore already meet NMC standards for good health and good character).

Nurse prescriber candidates must have at least three years’ full time experience (or equivalent) as a practising nurse, midwife or specialist nurse and be deemed suitable by the employer to undertake the programme. Of these three years, the year immediately preceding application to the programme must have been in the clinical field in which the intention is to prescribe, e.g. neonates, mental health.

Part-time workers must have practised for a sufficient period to be deemed competent by their employer.

A clinical need for prescribing exists within the registrant’s role to justify becoming a nurse prescriber.

The applicant has sufficient knowledge to apply prescribing principles taught on the programme of preparation to their own area and field of practice.

The applicant must be able to demonstrate appropriate numeracy skills (to be further developed within the context of prescribing and assessed on the course).

NMC advises that employers should not put registrants forward if they haven’t demonstrated the ability to diagnose in their area of specialty. (It is suggested that continuing professional development (CPD) reviews within the workplace might act as the vehicle for identifying such skills).

Nurses not undertaking or having previously undertaken a module in Health Assessment, must be assessed by their employers as being competent to take a history, undertake a clinical assessment, and make a diagnosis. For example, they must be able to carry out a comprehensive assessment of the patient’s physiological and/or psychological condition, and understand the underlying pathology and the appropriate medicines regime.

ATAS Clearance Required

No

Health Check Required

Yes

Portfolio Required

Interview Required

Mode of Study

Part Time

Type of Programme

Postgraduate

Length of Programme

1 Academic Year(s)

Total Credits for Programme

60

Exit Awards available

INSTITUTE INFORMATION

Awarding Institution/Body

Queen's University Belfast

Teaching Institution

Queen's University Belfast

School/Department

Nursing & Midwifery

Framework for Higher Education Qualification Level 
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/publications/information-and-guidance

Level 7

QAA Benchmark Group
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/assuring-standards-and-quality/the-quality-code/subject-benchmark-statements

Midwifery (2001)

Accreditations (PSRB)

Nursing and Midwifery Council

Date of most recent Accreditation Visit 25-01-12

External Examiner Name:

External Examiner Institution/Organisation

Ms Mary Drozd

University of Wolverhampton

REGULATION INFORMATION

Does the Programme have any approved exemptions from the University General Regulations
(Please see General Regulations)

None

Programme Specific Regulations

This programme leads to both the academic award of Postgraduate Certificate and a recorded professional award as a Nurse Prescriber (V300) with the NMC. The course is offered only as a part time option with students expected to devote a minimum of 12 practice days (or equivalent) to develop their prescribing skills. The structure enables Postgraduate students to exit with a Postgraduate Certificate in Non-Medical Prescribing.

The course consists of 2 modules of study (except for those students doing health assessment who will undertake 3 modules of study) taken over the academic year using a blended learning design which incorporates e-learning and on-site contact with lecturers. The course design is compatible with the Credit Accumulation and Transfer System so that students will earn 40 / 60 credits at level 7. It was anticipated when this course was conceived that students could elect to either exit with the award of Postgraduate Certificate in Non-Medical Prescribing or carry credits forward into further Postgraduate study should they wish to do so. Students may wish to complete additional level 7 modules and a dissertation to make up the credits for the award of a Masters Degree. Details of the modules and their corresponding credit level are listed below.

To achieve the professional award the programme involves two compulsory taught modules, Prescribing in Practice and Pharmacotherapeutics in Prescribing, each worth 20 credits. The course has high internal coherence and within permissible academic regulations, allows for academic progression.

During Semester One students embark on both modules. The design of these modules and their delivery together is based on NMC guidelines and good academic practice that subscribes to the integration of education and practice. This requires attention to the empirical basis for all aspects of prescribing. The module ‘Prescribing in Practice’ will include coverage of the basic principles involved In dealing with clients, the fundamental importance of evidence – based practice, the relationship between nursing and cognate professions, and ethical relationships between nursing and allied health professionals to implement safe effective prescribing. The module ‘Pharmocotherapeutics in Prescribing’ builds upon students existing knowledge base of pharmacology and its application to prescribing within the context of safe patient care. Students will be permitted the opportunity to study in detail the actions, interactions and side effects of drugs used within their scope of professional practice. The module Health Assessment is designed to facilitate a high level of skills in physical examination and reasoning and may be completed alongside the other two modules.


Duration of the Course and Requirements for the Award

The duration of this course is one academic year as a part time option only. The course consists of 2 modules of study, (Pharmacotherapeutics, and Prescribing in Practice). Students exit from the programme with 40 credits of study, thereby gaining the professional V300 award.

Those students who have not previously undertaken Health Assessment, or are not deemed competent in health assessment by their employer must undertake the Health Assessment module concurrently with the rest of the programme. Otherwise this module is optional. Those students undertaking the Health Assessment module gain an additional 20 credits, allowing them to exit with the professional V300 award and an academic qualification of Postgraduate Certificate in Non-Medical Prescribing.

Students are expected to devote 12 practice days (15 for students undertaking Health Assessment) to develop their prescribing skills.

Students undertaking the three modules commence all modules in semester one. Health Assessment is completed at the end of semester one. To facilitate the integration of theory and practice and spread the workload, the remaining two modules are both long thin modules which are taken across semester one and two, completing in May.


Structure and Content of the Programme

It has been agreed that, to provide adequate time for students to achieve the necessary level of knowledge and competence to ensure public safety, the course will normally last a period of one academic year part-time (including practice placement days). As guided by NMC standards this will consist of a minimum of eight face-to face taught days, excluding assessment. In addition, students must be given 12 days practice placement. During this time, students will develop their knowledge and competencies in relation to non-medical prescribing through theoretical learning and clinical experience.

Time Commitment to Programme
Time commitment and allocation Contact time E learning Total time
Prescribing in Practice 24 hours 12 hours 36 hours
Pharmacotherapeutics in Prescribing 24 hours 12 hours 36 hours

In addition, 12 days practice (minimum).

Academic Award:
Postgraduate Certificate in Non-Medical Prescribing (on successful completion of all three modules)
Work-based learning / placement.
All students entering this programme must be in current employment in a role where non-medical prescribing is a relevant aspect of their work. The portfolio provides clear evidence of work-based learning through the composition of learning contracts and sign off procedures designed to meet the competencies. Placement is organised by the student in negotiation with the employer and Designated Medical Practitioner (DMP), and in consultation with the Higher Education Institution. In most cases placement will be confined to the student’s place of employment. In cases where students cannot gain the skills required in their place of work the main objective will be to seek the experiences within another suitable environment. Placement is central to the development of the safe prescriber and the educational input and support of the DMP is crucial to the development of the necessary competencies.

Clinical placement of 12/15 days, which equates to 12/15 x7.5 hour (6.5 hours excluding breaks) days, is a compulsory part of this programme during which students develop their clinical skills under the supervision of a DMP, to be able to undertake their new role safely.

During their clinical experience, students are expected to:

Apply the theoretical knowledge acquired in assessment, diagnosis, treatment and care of patients;

Demonstrate clinical skills of assessment, diagnosis, and appropriate referrals and the ability to document these in a clear, concise manner using the appropriate documentation;

Develop efficacious and cost-effective pharmacotherapeutics regimes for patients across the life span relevant to their own area of practice;

Use their professional skills in providing appropriate education and empowering patients to make appropriate choices about treatment;

Monitor and evaluate the efficacy of prescribed regimes and amend as necessary;

Recognise and deal appropriately with ethical and professional issues that arise;

Collaborate with members of the multidisciplinary team involved in the management of prescribing, dispensing and monitoring care;

Become comfortable and proficient in their new role as an Independent and/or Supplementary prescriber;

Practice should include all aspects of medicines' management. Time should be spent with a range of non-medical prescribers, dispensing pharmacists and pharmacy technicians, as well as medical prescribers where possible.

This experience runs for the duration of the programme. Initially students will observe and then practice, under the close supervision of the DMP, the complete process of consultation, establishing options and prescribing effectively within context. As the student becomes more experienced, the DMP will gradually withdraw from close observation but findings and decisions will continue to be discussed with the DMP who will monitor the student’s progress and prescribe appropriately. During this clinical experience, the DMP will assess progress in the different aspects of the competencies shown in the Competency Portfolio.


Attendance:
Students are expected to attend all taught classes / workshops associated with the course and to engage appropriately with online learning.

Students must demonstrate that placement activity is being carried out according to requirements specified in the competency portfolio.

Interruptions to studies:
If the NMC registrant interrupts their studies whilst undertaking preparation for the Non-Medical Prescribing programme they must complete the programme in no more than two years from the identified start date of the programme. If a registrant has not completed all assessments within the allocated time, they must undertake the whole programme again, including all assessments, to ensure that competence has been maintained. For the purpose of the NMC requirement interruption means any absence from the programme of education other than annual leave, statutory and public holidays.

Assessment:
Assessment methods must examine the acquisition of theoretical knowledge and its application in practice, and the development of the clinical skills necessary for safe and cost-effective practice as a Nurse Prescriber. Assessment methods mirror the variety of learning objectives. On-going formative assessment occurs in practice where students are encouraged to discuss their progress with their DMP throughout the course. Within modules feedback from lecturers and peers help encourage development of student abilities. The internal and external moderation framework safeguards validity, reliability and fairness. The University Conceptual Equivalents Framework is used for marking of coursework. Student performance and progression in modules are assessed through coursework and/or examination (detailed in each module descriptor). Assessment is clearly linked to the learning outcomes of each of the modules and may be formative, summative or a combination thereof. Modules have a coursework element designed to test knowledge and understanding, integrate and apply information, and encourage the development of skills. Assessments will be used that are suited to the course objectives. Those employed include the following:

Assignments:
Assignments provide for the written development of the skills of clear articulation and argument.

Case studies:
Students will study and evaluate case studies in all modules, and will formulate their own case studies. Many skills that are important to professional prescribing, such as identification of issues, discrimination of evidence, selection of products and adherence to ethical codes of practice, are developed through this medium.

Multiple choice examinations:
On line examination, feedback is available immediately for practice tests.

Synoptic unseen written examination:
Written papers assess not only fundamental aspects of knowledge but also the student’s ability to write and articulate arguments, a key transferable skill. A synoptic examination is now a professional requirement for the NMC (20 MCQ and Short Answer Questions).

OSCE:
The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) is an examination that is assessed in a number of simulated clinical scenarios.

Competency portfolio:
The competency portfolio, which is maintained by students throughout the programme including their time on placement, provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate the acquisition of the competencies and skills. The DMP is ultimately responsible for assessing whether a student has achieved the competencies. Students are guided in the use of the competency portfolio to drive and tailor their learning experiences and to meet any deficits using learning contracts. The competency portfolio maps the student’s journey from novice to baseline competent prescribers.

Record of practice days:
Students complete a cumulative record of placement experience and log this in their portfolio.

Designated Medical Practitioner’s Role:
The DMP participates from the outset and to the end of the programme in assisting students to meet their learning objectives, including the task of taking responsibility for signing off the successful student at the end of their course of study.

Map of Assessment

A variation of assessment methods, reflecting the differing demands of level 7 study will be used in the different components of this programme and are discussed in more detail in the module outlines. Postgraduate module assessment requires students to demonstrate a higher level of the intellectual skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation than those at undergraduate level 3 (NMC standards of proficiency standard 11).

Assessment of Practice

The assessment of practice is the responsibility of the DMP who is providing support, teaching and supervision of the student with, (where possible), an experienced nurse prescriber who can ensure that learning is applied to specific areas of nursing practice. Each student will be assessed on their ability to apply prescribing principles to their own specialist area of practice. The competency portfolio is designed to allow the demonstration of the application of theory to practice, providing the rationale for prescribing decisions and reflective practice. It includes evidence of numeracy skills, writing prescriptions and prescribing activity in a range of scenarios.

Clinical Assessment
Assessment of the ability to undertake the role of Nurse Independent Supplementary Prescriber is carried out by the DMP through completion of the Record of Competency Achievement and review of the evidence presented for achievement of each behavioural indicator. It is important to monitor the students’ development in the achievement of clinical skills in order to identify any difficulties and provide additional tuition as necessary. The DMP plays a crucial part in this aspect of learning, and the lecturer and DMP will liaise during the programme. The Statement of Competence as a Nurse Independent Supplementary Prescriber must be signed by the DMP and the employer as a final declaration of fitness for recording the qualification on the NMC Register.


The following methods are used to evaluate progress in practice:

• The preparation and successful achievement of learning contracts will be monitored.

• Records of patient consultations, diagnosis and treatment prescribed will be reviewed. (The student in negotiation will determine the numbers and variety of cases with the studies advisor or module co-ordinator, depending on the student’s needs).

• The completion of the student's log of details of drugs and other prescribed substances used within their practice will be reviewed.

• The student’s progress in their development towards achieving the practice competencies will be regularly discussed.

• On two occasions the DMP will obtain additional written evaluation from service users regarding the student’s supervised prescribing activity.

Students with protected characteristics

This programme includes practical and clinical elements where patient safety must be the primary consideration.

Applications will be considered on an individual basis and in conjunction with professional guidelines, Occupational Health and Disability Services.

Are students subject to Fitness to Practise Regulations

(Please see General Regulations)

Yes
Yes

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF PROGRAMME

The aim of this postgraduate Level 7 programme is to prepare nurses, midwives and specialist nurses to be able to incorporate safe, appropriate and person-centred prescribing into their practice. This programme is available at postgraduate level (7) to take account of the professional and academic background and achievement in the target population. The clinical competency base is the same for undergraduate and postgraduate students but those studying at postgraduate level are expected to demonstrate a higher level of the intellectual skills of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation than those at undergraduate level. This is reflected in the Learning Outcomes for this programme.

Within this overall aim, the course is designed to enable students to:

• Evaluate the legislation regulating non-medical prescribing;
• Critically review the implications for their professional practice of undertaking the extended roles of prescribing and practice within a framework of professional accountability and responsibility;
• Use diagnostic reasoning skills on the data acquired from history and health assessment to achieve appropriate diagnoses;
• Apply knowledge of pharmacology in prescribing appropriate drugs to achieve defined health outcomes;
• Prescribe safely, appropriately and cost-effectively within the administrative arrangements in operation;
• Evaluate and document the effectiveness of drug therapy;
• Empower patients/clients and their carers and families through education for safe and effective self-management of drug therapy with recognition of their right to make their own decisions;
• Actively promote a team approach to non-medical prescribing;
• Utilise and integrate up-to-date information from a range of sources in decision-making about prescribing;
• Synthesise and evaluate theoretical knowledge relating to all aspects of non-medical prescribing, including the genesis and development of non-medical prescribing in the United Kingdom;
• Synthesise existing and new knowledge of pharmacotherapeutics and health assessment to the practice of person-centred non-medical prescribing;
• Demonstrate the academic skills to discriminate information at postgraduate level;
• Exercise sound judgement in the decision-making processes that are central to safe non-medical prescribing practice.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Learning Outcomes: Cognitive Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Safely apply the current relevant legislation to the practice of nurse/midwife prescribing.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The outcomes are developed through classes and coursework, individual and group projects, and assimilation and synthesis of synoptic material which allow students to demonstrate higher order intellectual qualities.

Methods of Assessment

These higher order qualities are mainly assessed through the coursework, examinations and the portfolio.

Critically reflect upon their knowledge of drug actions in prescribing practice.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The outcomes are developed through classes and coursework, individual and group projects, and assimilation and synthesis of synoptic material which allow students to demonstrate higher order intellectual qualities.

Methods of Assessment

These higher order qualities are mainly assessed through the coursework, examinations and the portfolio.

Prescribe safely, appropriately and cost effectively.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The outcomes are developed through classes and coursework, individual and group projects, and assimilation and synthesis of synoptic material which allow students to demonstrate higher order intellectual qualities.

Methods of Assessment

These higher order qualities are mainly assessed through the coursework, examinations and the portfolio.

Effectively debate the dilemmas arising in decision-making for prescribing.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The outcomes are developed through classes and coursework, individual and group projects, and assimilation and synthesis of synoptic material which allow students to demonstrate higher order intellectual qualities.

Methods of Assessment

These higher order qualities are mainly assessed through the coursework, examinations and the portfolio.

Learning Outcomes: Transferable Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Critically appraise, use sources of information/advice and decision support systems in prescribing practice.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The development of skills is embedded within the curriculum where they are taught, practised and assessed in a range of situations e.g. seminars, tutorials and practical sessions. The theoretical modules will provide the relevant knowledge underpinning these learning outcomes and they will develop the skills through supported exposure to situations in practice in which these skills are required. Students will continue to develop their clinical skills with the support and guidance of a mentor, discussion with their Studies Advisor, and continual reflection on practice to promote their development in these areas.

Methods of Assessment

These skills are assessed in conjunction with cognitive knowledge through a variety of strategies including: group work, discussion, problem solving activities and presentations. Where appropriate the learning outcomes will be assessed through supervised practice and by the completion of the clinical practice portfolio. Assessment methods also will require students to demonstrate their developing skills through case studies, essays and OSCE. A mix of formative and summative assessment will be used.

Demonstrate a critical appreciation of the roles and relationships of others involved in prescribing, supplying and administering medicines.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The development of skills is embedded within the curriculum where they are taught, practiced and assessed in a range of situations e.g. seminars, tutorials and practical sessions. The theoretical modules will provide the relevant knowledge underpinning these learning outcomes and they will develop the skills through supported exposure to situations in practice in which these skills are required. Students will continue to develop their clinical skills with the support and guidance of a mentor, discussion with their Studies Advisor, and continual reflection on practice to promote their development in these areas.

Methods of Assessment

These skills are assessed in conjunction with cognitive knowledge through a variety of strategies including: group work, discussion, problem solving activities and presentations. Where appropriate the learning outcomes will be assessed through supervised practice and by the completion of the clinical practice portfolio. Assessment methods also will require students to demonstrate their developing skills through case studies, essays and OSCE. A mix of formative and summative assessment will be used.

Demonstrate safe and effective clinical decision making.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The development of skills is embedded within the curriculum where they are taught, practised and assessed in a range of situations e.g. seminars, tutorials and practical sessions. The theoretical modules will provide the relevant knowledge underpinning these learning outcomes and they will develop the skills through supported exposure to situations in practice in which these skills are required. Students will continue to develop their clinical skills with the support and guidance of a mentor, discussion with their Studies Advisor, and continual reflection on practice to promote their development in these areas.

Methods of Assessment

These skills are assessed in conjunction with cognitive knowledge through a variety of strategies including: group work, discussion, problem solving activities and presentations. Where appropriate the learning outcomes will be assessed through supervised practice and by the completion of the clinical practice portfolio. Assessment methods also will require students to demonstrate their developing skills through case studies, essays and OSCE. A mix of formative and summative assessment will be used.

Demonstrate confidence in leading practice development.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The development of skills is embedded within the curriculum where they are taught, practiced and assessed in a range of situations e.g. seminars, tutorials and practical sessions. The theoretical modules will provide the relevant knowledge underpinning these learning outcomes and they will develop the skills through supported exposure to situations in practice in which these skills are required. Students will continue to develop their clinical skills with the support and guidance of a mentor, discussion with their Studies Advisor, and continual reflection on practice to promote their development in these areas.

Methods of Assessment

These skills are assessed in conjunction with cognitive knowledge through a variety of strategies including: group work, discussion, problem solving activities and presentations. Where appropriate the learning outcomes will be assessed through supervised practice and by the completion of the clinical practice portfolio. Assessment methods also will require students to demonstrate their developing skills through case studies, essays and OSCE. A mix of formative and summative assessment will be used.

Engage in self-directed activity with guidance/evaluation.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The development of skills is embedded within the curriculum where they are taught, practised and assessed in a range of situations e.g. seminars, tutorials and practical sessions. The theoretical modules will provide the relevant knowledge underpinning these learning outcomes and they will develop the skills through supported exposure to situations in practice in which these skills are required. Students will continue to develop their clinical skills with the support and guidance of a mentor, discussion with their Studies Advisor, and continual reflection on practice to promote their development in these areas.

Methods of Assessment

These skills are assessed in conjunction with cognitive knowledge through a variety of strategies including: group work, discussion, problem solving activities and presentations. Where appropriate the learning outcomes will be assessed through supervised practice and by the completion of the clinical practice portfolio. Assessment methods also will require students to demonstrate their developing skills through case studies, essays and OSCE. A mix of formative and summative assessment will be used.

Support colleagues through caring, education and supervision, encouraging reflection and role modelling.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The development of skills is embedded within the curriculum where they are taught, practised and assessed in a range of situations e.g. seminars, tutorials and practical sessions. The theoretical modules will provide the relevant knowledge underpinning these learning outcomes and they will develop the skills through supported exposure to situations in practice in which these skills are required. Students will continue to develop their clinical skills with the support and guidance of a mentor, discussion with their Studies Advisor, and continual reflection on practice to promote their development in these areas.

Methods of Assessment

1. Critically appraise, use sources of information/advice and decision support systems in prescribing practice. The development of skills is embedded within the curriculum where they are taught, practised and assessed in a range of situations e.g. seminars, tutorials and practical sessions. The theoretical modules will provide the relevant knowledge underpinning these learning outcomes and they will develop the skills through supported exposure to situations in practice in which these skills are required. Students will continue to develop their clinical skills with the support and guidance of a mentor, discussion with their Studies Advisor, and continual reflection on practice to promote their development in these areas. These skills are assessed in conjunction with cognitive knowledge through a variety of strategies including: group work, discussion, problem solving activities and presentations. Where appropriate the learning outcomes will be assessed through supervised practice and by the completion of the clinical practice portfolio. Assessment methods also will require students to demonstrate their developing skills through case studies, essays and OSCE. A mix of formative and summative assessment will be used.

Effectively manage ethical and legal issues that arise in practice.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The development of skills is embedded within the curriculum where they are taught, practised and assessed in a range of situations e.g. seminars, tutorials and practical sessions. The theoretical modules will provide the relevant knowledge underpinning these learning outcomes and they will develop the skills through supported exposure to situations in practice in which these skills are required. Students will continue to develop their clinical skills with the support and guidance of a mentor, discussion with their Studies Advisor, and continual reflection on practice to promote their development in these areas.

Methods of Assessment

These skills are assessed in conjunction with cognitive knowledge through a variety of strategies including: group work, discussion, problem solving activities and presentations. Where appropriate the learning outcomes will be assessed through supervised practice and by the completion of the clinical practice portfolio. Assessment methods also will require students to demonstrate their developing skills through case studies, essays and OSCE. A mix of formative and summative assessment will be used.

Challenge habitual or ineffectual prescribing practice

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The development of skills is embedded within the curriculum where they are taught, practiced and assessed in a range of situations e.g. seminars, tutorials and practical sessions. The theoretical modules will provide the relevant knowledge underpinning these learning outcomes and they will develop the skills through supported exposure to situations in practice in which these skills are required. Students will continue to develop their clinical skills with the support and guidance of a mentor, discussion with their Studies Advisor, and continual reflection on practice to promote their development in these areas.

Methods of Assessment

These skills are assessed in conjunction with cognitive knowledge through a variety of strategies including: group work, discussion, problem solving activities and presentations. Where appropriate the learning outcomes will be assessed through supervised practice and by the completion of the clinical practice portfolio. Assessment methods also will require students to demonstrate their developing skills through case studies, essays and OSCE. A mix of formative and summative assessment will be used.

Demonstrate entrepreneurial flair in innovating in clinical practice.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The development of skills is embedded within the curriculum where they are taught, practised and assessed in a range of situations e.g. seminars, tutorials and practical sessions. The theoretical modules will provide the relevant knowledge underpinning these learning outcomes and they will develop the skills through supported exposure to situations in practice in which these skills are required. Students will continue to develop their clinical skills with the support and guidance of a mentor, discussion with their Studies Advisor, and continual reflection on practice to promote their development in these areas.

Methods of Assessment

These skills are assessed in conjunction with cognitive knowledge through a variety of strategies including: group work, discussion, problem solving activities and presentations. Where appropriate the learning outcomes will be assessed through supervised practice and by the completion of the clinical practice portfolio. Assessment methods also will require students to demonstrate their developing skills through case studies, essays and OSCE. A mix of formative and summative assessment will be used.

Communicate effectively and professionally through the use of verbal and written forms.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The development of skills is embedded within the curriculum where they are taught, practiced and assessed in a range of situations e.g. seminars, tutorials and practical sessions. The theoretical modules will provide the relevant knowledge underpinning these learning outcomes and they will develop the skills through supported exposure to situations in practice in which these skills are required. Students will continue to develop their clinical skills with the support and guidance of a mentor, discussion with their Studies Advisor, and continual reflection on practice to promote their development in these areas.

Methods of Assessment

These skills are assessed in conjunction with cognitive knowledge through a variety of strategies including: group work, discussion, problem solving activities and presentations. Where appropriate the learning outcomes will be assessed through supervised practice and by the completion of the clinical practice portfolio. Assessment methods also will require students to demonstrate their developing skills through case studies, essays and OSCE. A mix of formative and summative assessment will be used.

Learning Outcomes: Knowledge & Understanding

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Critically review the theoretical basis of non-medical prescribing.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Knowledge and the capacity to achieve the above outcomes are acquired through: lectures, guest lectures (e.g. prescribing advisor(s), BSO representatives), seminars, practical workshops, case studies, topic centred guided reading, tutorials and use of supporting online material. Video and other material is used to support this. In all modules, eLearning is used to support the theoretical instruction and student centred-learning (individual and group activities).

Methods of Assessment

Modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and examinations. Assessment methods require students to demonstrate the application of knowledge to practice through course work, for example, care plans or case studies, essays and OSCE where appropriate. A mix of formative and summative assessment is used. The learning outcomes will also be assessed in practice by the Designated Medical Practitioner (DMP) and through the completion of the portfolio. Each module adopts a unique assessment strategy and includes more than one of the following:

• Assignments
• Literature reviews/critical reports
• Individual/group presentations
• Unseen written examinations
• Multiple choice questions examinations
• Short answer questions
• Numeracy testing
• Portfolio completion

Critically consider the historical foundations and evolution of non-medical prescribing

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Knowledge and the capacity to achieve the above outcomes are acquired through: lectures, guest lectures (e.g. prescribing advisor(s), BSO representatives), seminars, practical workshops, case studies, topic centred guided reading, tutorials and use of supporting online material. Video and other material is used to support this. In all modules, eLearning is used to support the theoretical instruction and student centred-learning (individual and group activities).

Methods of Assessment

Modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and examinations. Assessment methods require students to demonstrate the application of knowledge to practice through course work, for example, care plans or case studies, essays and OSCE where appropriate. A mix of formative and summative assessment is used. The learning outcomes will also be assessed in practice by the Designated Medical Practitioner (DMP) and through the completion of the portfolio. Each module adopts a unique assessment strategy and includes more than one of the following:

• Assignments
• Literature reviews/critical reports
• Individual/group presentations
• Unseen written examinations
• Multiple choice questions examinations
• Short answer questions
• Numeracy testing
• Portfolio completion

Evaluate the goals of professional and monitoring bodies and how they govern public protection in prescribing, regionally and nationally.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Knowledge and the capacity to achieve the above outcomes are acquired through: lectures, guest lectures (e.g. prescribing advisor(s), BSO representatives), seminars, practical workshops, case studies, topic centred guided reading, tutorials and use of supporting online material. Video and other material is used to support this. In all modules, eLearning is used to support the theoretical instruction and student centred-learning (individual and group activities).

Methods of Assessment

Modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and examinations. Assessment methods require students to demonstrate the application of knowledge to practise through course work, for example, care plans or case studies, essays and OSCE where appropriate. A mix of formative and summative assessment is used. The learning outcomes will also be assessed in practice by the Designated Medical Practitioner (DMP) and through the completion of the portfolio. Each module adopts a unique assessment strategy and includes more than one of the following:

• Assignments
• Literature reviews/critical reports
• Individual/group presentations
• Unseen written examinations
• Multiple choice questions examinations
• Short answer questions
• Numeracy testing
• Portfolio completion

Appraise the available knowledge and critical understanding of research, theory and practice in relation to prescribing practice.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Knowledge and the capacity to achieve the above outcomes are acquired through: lectures, guest lectures (e.g. prescribing advisor(s), BSO representatives), seminars, practical workshops, case studies, topic centred guided reading, tutorials and use of supporting online material. Video and other material is used to support this. In all modules, eLearning is used to support the theoretical instruction and student centred-learning (individual and group activities).

Methods of Assessment

Modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and examinations. Assessment methods require students to demonstrate the application of knowledge to practice through course work, for example, care plans or case studies, essays and OSCE where appropriate. A mix of formative and summative assessment is used. The learning outcomes will also be assessed in practice by the Designated Medical Practitioner (DMP) and through the completion of the portfolio. Each module adopts a unique assessment strategy and includes more than one of the following:

• Assignments
• Literature reviews/critical reports
• Individual/group presentations
• Unseen written examinations
• Multiple choice questions examinations
• Short answer questions
• Numeracy testing
• Portfolio completion

Be able to articulate the links between theory and evidence-based practice.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Knowledge and the capacity to achieve the above outcomes are acquired through: lectures, guest lectures (e.g. prescribing advisor(s), BSO representatives), seminars, practical workshops, case studies, topic centred guided reading, tutorials and use of supporting online material. Video and other material is used to support this. In all modules, eLearning is used to support the theoretical instruction and student centred-learning (individual and group activities).

Methods of Assessment

Modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and examinations. Assessment methods require students to demonstrate the application of knowledge to practice through course work, for example, care plans or case studies, essays and OSCE where appropriate. A mix of formative and summative assessment is used. The learning outcomes will also be assessed in practice by the Designated Medical Practitioner (DMP) and through the completion of the portfolio. Each module adopts a unique assessment strategy and includes more than one of the following:

• Assignments
• Literature reviews/critical reports
• Individual/group presentations
• Unseen written examinations
• Multiple choice questions examinations
• Short answer questions
• Numeracy testing
• Portfolio completion

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Practice within a framework of professional accountability and responsibility.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The students' ability to achieve the outcomes is developed throughout the programme through directed study and practical workshops, debate and discussion, the use of learning contracts, development of the portfolio and independent learning building on previously acquired knowledge and skills. Students will continue to develop their clinical skills with the support and guidance of a mentor. In addition, through discussion with their Studies Advisor, reflection on practice and clinical supervision will promote their development in these areas.

Methods of Assessment

Professional and practical skills are mainly assessed through the portfolio, the presentation of seminar work and the OSCE examination.

Undertake a thorough history, including medication history and current medication (including over-the-counter, alternative and complementary health therapies) to inform diagnosis

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The students' ability to achieve the outcomes is developed throughout the programme through directed study and practical workshops, debate and discussion, the use of learning contracts, development of the portfolio and independent learning building on previously acquired knowledge and skills. Students will continue to develop their clinical skills with the support and guidance of a mentor. In addition, through discussion with their Studies Advisor, reflection on practice and clinical supervision will promote their development in these areas.

Methods of Assessment

Professional and practical skills are mainly assessed through the portfolio, the presentation of seminar work and the OSCE examination.

Assess and consult with patients/clients, parents and carers.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The students' ability to achieve the outcomes is developed throughout the programme through directed study and practical workshops, debate and discussion, the use of learning contracts, development of the portfolio and independent learning building on previously acquired knowledge and skills. Students will continue to develop their clinical skills with the support and guidance of a mentor. In addition, through discussion with their Studies Advisor, reflection on practice and clinical supervision will promote their development in these areas.

Methods of Assessment

Professional and practical skills are mainly assessed through the portfolio, the presentation of seminar work and the OSCE examination.

Demonstrate the ability to discriminate and evaluate the influences that can affect prescribing practice, and demonstrate understanding by managing prescribing practice in an ethical way.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The students ability to achieve the outcomes is developed throughout the programme through directed study and practical workshops, debate and discussion, the use of learning contracts, development of the portfolio and independent learning building on previously acquired knowledge and skills. Students will continue to develop their clinical skills with the support and guidance of a mentor. In addition, through discussion with their Studies Advisor, reflection on practice and clinical supervision will promote their development in these areas.

Methods of Assessment

Professional and practical skills are mainly assessed through the portfolio, the presentation of seminar work and the OSCE examination.

Develop a clinical management plan within legislative requirements (Supplementary prescribing only).

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The students' ability to achieve the outcomes is developed throughout the programme through directed study and practical workshops, debate and discussion, the use of learning contracts, development of the portfolio and independent learning building on previously acquired knowledge and skills. Students will continue to develop their clinical skills with the support and guidance of a mentor. In addition, through discussion with their Studies Advisor, reflection on practice and clinical supervision will promote their development in these areas.

Methods of Assessment

Professional and practical skills are mainly assessed through the portfolio, the presentation of seminar work and the OSCE examination.

MODULE INFORMATION

Programme Requirements

Module Title

Module Code

Level/ stage

Credits

Availability

Duration

Pre-requisite

 

Assessment

 

 

 

 

S1

S2

 

 

Core

Option

Coursework %

Practical %

Examination %

Prescribing in Practice

NMP7000

7

20

24 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Pharmacotherapeutics in Prescribing

NMP7001

7

20

24 weeks

N

YES

80%

0%

20%

Health Assessment

NMP7002

7

20

YES

24 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Notes

NMP7002 Only compulsory for students who are not exempt from Health Assessment.