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BTH Theology

Academic Year 2017/18

A programme specification is required for any programme on which a student may be registered. All programmes of the University are subject to the University's Quality Assurance and Enhancement processes as set out in the DASA Policies and Procedures Manual.

Programme Title

BTH Theology

Final Award
(exit route if applicable for Postgraduate Taught Programmes)

Bachelor of Theology

Programme Code

THE-BTH-S

UCAS Code

V612

JACS Code

V610 (DESCR) 100

Criteria for Admissions

•There are no subject specific requirements for this pathway.
•A-level: BBB
•Irish Leaving Certificate (Higher Level): B2B2B2B2CC/B2B2B2B2B2
•International candidates require at least a British Council IELTS qualification scored at a standard of 6.5. TOEFL iBT 90 with minimum marks as follows:
Listening: 17; Reading: 18; Speaking: 20; Writing: 17.
•Students are enrolled as members of Queen's University Belfast, but all teaching is carried out through the constituent Theological College, Union Theological College.

ATAS Clearance Required

No

Health Check Required

No

Portfolio Required

Interview Required

Mode of Study

Full Time

Type of Programme

Single Honours

Length of Programme

3 Academic Year(s)

Total Credits for Programme

360

Exit Awards available

INSTITUTE INFORMATION

Awarding Institution/Body

Queen's University Belfast

Teaching Institution

Queen's University Belfast

School/Department

Institute of Theology

Framework for Higher Education Qualification Level 
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/publications/information-and-guidance

Level 6

QAA Benchmark Group
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/assuring-standards-and-quality/the-quality-code/subject-benchmark-statements

Theology and religious studies (2014)

Accreditations (PSRB)

External Examiner Name:

External Examiner Institution/Organisation

Professor Densil Morgan

University of Wales

Professor Wayne Morris

University of Chester

Dr David Moffitt

University of St Andrews

REGULATION INFORMATION

Does the Programme have any approved exemptions from the University General Regulations
(Please see General Regulations)

N/A

Programme Specific Regulations

On completing Level I a Joint Honours student who has passed 60 CATS at Level I in Theology modules may be admitted to this Single Honours programme having obtained the approval of the advisor of studies for the programme.

Candidates will not normally be permitted to take more than 40 CATS of independent research in their final year of study.

Students with protected characteristics

N/A

Are students subject to Fitness to Practise Regulations

(Please see General Regulations)

No

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF PROGRAMME

• To provide an education in the knowledge and understanding of a range of theological disciplines:
a) by offering a balanced and coherent education while giving students the flexibility to choose some modules according to their aptitudes and interests;
b) by providing learning resources and academic and pastoral support and guidance as needed;
c) by monitoring the progress of students through assessment and examination;

• To offer wide access to students coming from sixth-form study or re-entering education;

• To develop students' knowledge and transferable skills base in ways which will enhance their employment opportunities and enable them to make a valuable contribution to society;

• To equip able and interested students with the necessary base from which to engage in further research on theological subjects and enable them to test their aptitude for and interest in research;

To provide opportunity for students to relate the study of Theology to its outworking in a church or mission situation.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Learning Outcomes: Cognitive Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

• a capacity to undertake exegetical analysis of sacred texts in translation

• An ability to access current research on each subject area covered

• An ability to evaluate critically modern theories and approaches.

• An ability to present cogent arguments in formal examinations and course assignments.

• An ability to discuss controversial theological issues from a variety of perspectives.

• The capacity to reflect upon and evaluate theological ideas in active Christian life.

An ability to question sensitively cultural and religious assumptions.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Teaching/Learning Methods used on the BTh Theology pathway foster cognitive skills in the following ways:
Lectures and tutorials together provide the opportunity to discuss, evaluate and subject-specific knowledge:
• They also expose students to specific contextual and theoretical information as well as offering practical examples of different critical approaches.
• Seminars offer a variety of tutor-led and student-led learning opportunities as well as a more sustained opportunity to debate and evaluate a breadth of knowledge gained independently from directed reading and from the sharing of resources and information.
• Group presentations are used to encourage students to pursue their own interests, collaborate with peers, negotiate the demands of teamwork and develop their understanding of a topic.
• Dissertation work is a programme of independent study agreed between student and supervisor designed to test the student’s capacity to manage independent study
• Through class discussions, students develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material and the ability to formulate their own arguments and responses.
• Class presentations and student interaction in small group sessions (e.g. tutorials or seminars) develop communication and rhetorical skills.
• Student-centred learning situations encourage the ability to present and summarise knowledge to peers in a coherent, structured form, and to enhance further organisational and inter-personal skills.
• Writing skills tutorials and lectures develop essay-writing on stylistic, structural, rhetorical and bibliographical levels. The ability to collate and obtain information is developed through introductory training in the use of libraries and online resources.

Methods of Assessment

Assessments required of students on the Theology BTh pathway test and develop capacity to demonstrate the following cognitive skills:
• To undertake time-limited reflection upon research projects/tasks
• To express in fluent and appropriate written terms the results of research
• To express in fluent and appropriate oral terms the results of research
• To response promptly to alternate views and challenges to propositions made in research
• To set time-tables and targets for research- and project management
• To engage with theoretical models of interpretation
• To comprehend complex ideas
• To be self-reflective;
• To exercise sound, reasoned judgment;
• To think independently, originally and in a constructively critical manner;
• To appreciate a variety of textual and cultural perspectives on academic enquiry;
• To synthesise diverse primary evidence and subsequent academic comment;
• To assess and appraise differing views on significant areas of academic debate;
• To discriminate between what is central and what is peripheral to the issue in question;
• To evaluate sources and academic comment critically in their context;
• To make judgments on the basis of varied and problematic evidence and according to the persuasiveness of the arguments or the reliability of the evidence used.
• To gather, organise and deploy evidence, data and information from a variety of secondary and some primary sources, so as to formulate and support a line of reasoning, or argument;
• To appreciate the importance of and comply with the ethical requirements of study, which requires critical and reflective use of information and information technology in the learning process

Learning Outcomes: Knowledge & Understanding

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of five key theological disciplines.

• undertake exegetical exploration and analysis of canonical Biblical texts in translation,

• reconstruct the context of the production of ideas and evaluate their influence on society at different historical periods as well as in the contemporary world.

• Appreciate the ways in which theological thinking informs pastoral work and mission

• Possess knowledge and understanding of the main philosophical issues relating to Christian theology

• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the interaction between Christianity and contemporary culture.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Teaching and learning strategies used on the programme will have established:
• a knowledge of the core subject knowledge base for the academic study of Theology

• an awareness of the most influential ideas shaping the academic discourse in Theology

• an understanding of how academic enquiry is conducted in Theology

• an understanding of academic dialectics

• an aptitude for researching, promoting and publishing ideas in an academic context

Methods of Assessment

Assessment methods used on the programme will have achieved the Knowledge and Understanding outcomes by requiring students to demonstrate:

• Analytical and critical knowledge of the key texts relevant to the disciplines as currently conceived
• significant engagement with influential contemporary and historical thinking on the subjects
• discipline-specific analytical techniques (exegesis, literary-critical analysis, historical analysis, comprehension of theoretical and methodological practice in pursuit of scholarly objectives, theoretical rigour)
• clear, concise and informed presentation of ideas
• aptitude for academic debate and discussion in both written- and oral form..

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

As a discipline, Theology seeks to promote its own unique subject skills through developing students’ capacity to understand and reflect upon the nature its different sub-disciplines.

Many subject-specific skills are complementary and mutually reinforcing, and students should develop the ability to research, gather, sift and deploy relevant information and concepts, discriminating between what is central and what is peripheral to the issue in question; to evaluate sources critically in their context; and to make judgments on the basis of varied and problematic evidence.

Students should also be able to understand, discriminate between, and evaluate critically conflicting theoretical and interpretative positions, and form a judgment on their validity according to the persuasiveness of the arguments and the reliability of the evidence used.

More specifically, students on the BTh pathway will acquire the ability to:

• read texts with a developed awareness and appreciation of their formal, structural, stylistic, and culturally specific properties;
• bring knowledge to bear on critical interpretation of the ways in which different cultural and historical contexts inform the reading and writing of texts, as well as subsequent theological interpretations;
• conduct critical debate, drawing on and engaging with different critical perspectives in the analysis of texts;
• be aware of key debates in theological debate;
• write coherent, structured and intellectually rigorous essays in answer to specific questions on theological and secular literature;
• comprehend and highlight key primary texts as a fundamental feature of academic debate, engaging with influential modern critical analysis;
• develop the key skills of academic presentation of work: fluency of expression, citation protocols and bibliographical conventions

• reflect upon a wide range of experience and skills particularly in relation to communication and pastoral care.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Teaching and learning strategies used on the programme will have established:
• a familiarity with the core knowledge base for the academic study of Theology

• an awareness of the most influential ideas shaping the academic discourse in Theology

• an understanding of how academic enquiry is conducted in each

• an understanding of academic dialectics

an aptitude for researching, promoting and publishing ideas in an academic context both written and orally.

Methods of Assessment

The assessment regime on the programme is comprised of a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, language class-tests, data analysis, essays, critical book/article reviews, portfolios, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions. These vary in accordance with the specific learning outcomes of particular modules as set out in the individual module descriptions. Formative written work assists the development of understanding, critical judgment, and independent thought, both through the feedback given, and through the process of writing itself. Analytical, discursive, interpretive and critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, analyse, contextualise, interpret and criticise relevant material.

All these assessment methods require students to demonstrate the subject skills which are detailed in each School’s criteria for marking undergraduate work. While these teaching and assessment methods deliver information to students and test their knowledge of that information in each subject, students are encouraged to assimilate and apply knowledge of both disciplines discretely to become independent, self-reflective learners. Module guides and Handbooks inform students in their choice of, access to, and citation of relevant secondary materials.

The different methods of assessment serve different, but complementary, purposes:

• Examinations and essays require that students demonstrate coverage of material, appropriate methods of analysis, the ability to discriminate between arguments, and the ability to form an independent argument.
• Written exams help students gain a knowledge of a topic that can be readily and directly applied to a set problem or question, and also test their ability to select relevant information and to write clearly and concisely within a set time.
• Group presentations are used to encourage students to pursue their own interests and develop their understanding of a topic.
• Extended essays test their ability to order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which to present and prioritise material.

• Coursework is required to be submitted in a specified form and to fixed deadlines, thus teaching students to learn to prioritise assignments and objectives and to hone their organisational and time-management skills.

Feedback is provided for each type and instance of assessment and students may seek dedicated feedback sessions with course tutors. Personal Development Planning facilitates student reflection upon academic performance and assists in developing strategies for improvement.

Learning Outcomes: Transferable Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Students of Theology develop a range of transferable skills appropriate to a wide variety of professional situations as well as those required of ministry and administration in a Christian vocation.
Ability in oral and written communication.

Competence in basic IT skills.
Ability to work independently and also the ability to work in collaboration with others.
The ability to participate effectively in group discussion.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures and tutorials expose students to the tasks of:
• comprehending and evaluating new and complex information within a time-limited context
• observing the techniques of expert analysis and presentation of research data

• Seminars:

• offer a variety of tutor- and student-led learning opportunities as well as a more sustained opportunity to debate and evaluate a breadth of knowledge gained independently from directed reading and from the sharing of resources and information.

• Group presentations:

encourage students to pursue their own interests, collaborate with peers, negotiate the demands of teamwork and develop their understanding of a topic.

• Dissertations:

• Test the capacity of students to undertake a programme of independent study agreed between student and supervisor

• Class discussions:

• Allow students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material and the ability to formulate their own arguments and responses.

• Class presentations:

• Encourage student interaction in small group sessions (e.g. tutorials or seminars) and develop communication and rhetorical skills.

• Student-centred learning situations:

encourage the ability of students to present and summarise knowledge to peers in a coherent, structured form, and to enhance further organisational and inter-personal skills.

• Writing skills tutorials and lectures:

• develop essay-writing on stylistic, structural, rhetorical and bibliographical levels. The ability to collate and obtain information is enhanced by introductory training in the use of libraries and online resources.

Methods of Assessment

Methods of assessment on the programme establish and refine transferable skills in the following ways:

• Written examinations:
• Ask of students high-level skills of thorough familiarisation with specific subjects
• Time-limited exposition of analysis of specific subjects
• Swift structuring and presentation of ideas
• Distillation of essentials and exclusion of information of marginal importance

• Seminars require:

• Interaction with subject experts and peers in analysing subjects, themes and ideas within a group or team context


• Group presentations:

encourage students to collaborate with peers and negotiate the demands of teamwork.

• Dissertations:

• Test the capacity of students to take ownership of independent study projects
• They demand discipline, maturity and high-level skills of academic organisation

• Journalling:

• Encourages sustained reflective and evaluative practice

MODULE INFORMATION

Programme Requirements

Module Title

Module Code

Level/ stage

Credits

Availability

Duration

Pre-requisite

 

Assessment

 

 

 

 

S1

S2

 

 

Core

Option

Coursework %

Practical %

Examination %

Early Church History

THE1031

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Advanced Hebrew

THE3021

3

20

YES

12 weeks

Y

YES

100%

0%

0%

John

THE3014

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Trends in Modern Theology

THE3043

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Dissertation

THE3071

3

20

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Biblical Texts

THE1012

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

40%

0%

60%

Romans

THE3085

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

40%

0%

60%

Christianity in the Sixteenth Century

THE3091

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Research project

THE3072

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Introduction to Practical Theology

THE1043

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Reconciliation Studies 1

THE3068

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Youth Ministry 2

THE3058

3

20

YES

12 weeks

Y

YES

100%

0%

0%

Old Testament Historical Books

THE2003

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

New Testament Epistles A

THE2011

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Biblical Hebrew Texts

THE2026

2

20

24 weeks

Y

YES

40%

0%

60%

The Christian Doctrinal Tradition

THE2039

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

The Church, Ministries and Society 3

THE3050

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Introduction to Theological Thinking

THE1045

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

40%

0%

60%

In search of the Good Life: ethics from Plato to Postmodernity

THE2055

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

40%

0%

60%

Study of World Religions

THE2061

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

The Theology and Practice of Pastoral Care

THE2069

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Christianity in Ireland since the Reformation

THE2097

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

New Testament Greek Texts

THE2027

2

20

24 weeks

Y

YES

40%

0%

60%

Youth Ministry 1

THE2057

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Introduction to Biblical Languages

THE1046

1

20

24 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Introduction to Jesus and the Gospels

THE1002

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

40%

0%

60%

Double CATS Dissertation

THE3073

3

40

24 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Theology Project - Church History: WWI Fieldtrip

THE3074

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Biblical Theology

THE2008

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

40%

0%

60%

Old Testament Prophetic Texts

THE3009

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Beyond Paradise: an introduction to the Pentateuch

THE1003

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Notes

At Stage 1, students must take 100 CATS from the five core modules with the remaining 20 CATS to be selected from the optional modules.

At Stage 2, students must take a total of 120 CATS with at least ONE module being taken from FOUR of the following areas: Old Testament; New Testament; Systematic Theology/Philosophy; Church History; Practical Theology. Students may substitute up to 20 CATS of optional modules with the equivalent number of CATS from a list of approved modules beyond those listed.

At Stage 3, students are permitted to take up to 40 CATS from the independent research modules. Students may substitute up to 20 CATS of optional modules with the equivalent number of CATS from a list of approved modules beyond those listed.