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BA Film and Theatre Making

Academic Year 2017/18

A programme specification is required for any programme on which a student may be registered. All programmes of the University are subject to the University's Quality Assurance and Enhancement processes as set out in the DASA Policies and Procedures Manual.

Programme Title

BA Film and Theatre Making

Final Award
(exit route if applicable for Postgraduate Taught Programmes)

Bachelor of Arts

Programme Code

FMT-BA-S

UCAS Code

WW65

JACS Code

W470 (DESCR) 50

Criteria for Admissions

ABB at A Level.
International applicants, for whom English is not their first language, must demonstrate evidence of an IELTS* score of 6.5, with not less than 5.5 in any component, or an equivalent qualification acceptable to the University. *Taken within the last 2 years.
Prior experiential learning will be considered on an individual basis under the University's Recognition of Prior Learning Policy: http://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/AcademicStudentAffairs/AcademicAffairs/GeneralRegulations/Procedures/ProceduresforRecognitionofPriorLearningRPL/

ATAS Clearance Required

No

Health Check Required

No

Portfolio Required

Portfolio or audition required

Interview Required

Portfolio or audition required

Mode of Study

Full Time

Type of Programme

Single Honours

Length of Programme

3 Academic Year(s)

Total Credits for Programme

360

Exit Awards available

INSTITUTE INFORMATION

Awarding Institution/Body

Queen's University Belfast

Teaching Institution

Queen's University Belfast

School/Department

Arts, English and Languages

Framework for Higher Education Qualification Level 
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/publications/information-and-guidance

Level 6

QAA Benchmark Group
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/assuring-standards-and-quality/the-quality-code/subject-benchmark-statements

Communication, media, film and cultural studies (2008)

Accreditations (PSRB)

External Examiner Name:

External Examiner Institution/Organisation

Professor Jane Taylor

University of Leeds

Professor Maggie Gale

University of Manchester

Dr Fiona Handyside

University of Exeter

Dr Jill Daniels

University of East London

REGULATION INFORMATION

Does the Programme have any approved exemptions from the University General Regulations
(Please see General Regulations)

None

Programme Specific Regulations

To enhance flexibility for students to take modules outside the Programme, at Level 2 a student may substitute up to 20 CATS of optional modules with the equivalent number of CATS from a list of approved modules beyond those listed.

Students with protected characteristics

N/A

Are students subject to Fitness to Practise Regulations

(Please see General Regulations)

No

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF PROGRAMME

The BA in Film and Theatre Making is designed to provide students with:
* A strong understanding of the skills, practices, processes, and demands of producing professional work for both stage and screen.
* Detailed practical training in acting, directing, and production aspects of both film and theatre.
* An intellectual training in the separate and overlapping disciplines of drama and film which, while discrete subjects, are also complementary and mutually enriching;
* A discipline-specific perspective enabling the acquisition of knowledge and understanding of the inter-relationship between texts and contexts, a familiarity with debates surrounding culture and identity, both individual and communal, and skills in synthesising and developing ideas and arguments from diverse literary, performative, contemporary sources and visual literacy;
* A range of skills, which together foster the ability to practise self-motivated learning and increase the capacity to undertake independent learning in a progressive way.
* Exposure to, contact with and relationships with (and tutelage from) industry professionals across the fields of film and theatre (and the arts in general)

This degree will equip individuals with the ability to:
* Think critically, process and understand complex information and to present it in a variety of written and oral forms, particularly through performance and production;
* Understand the different ways in which theatre and film are structured and convey meaning, as well as ways in which they work similarly;
* Evaluate primary and secondary sources;
* Interpret a variety of types of data and information;
* Pursue independent learning;
* Work well in groups and formulate arguments.

More generally, the programme aims to:
* Provide students with the necessary intellectual, practical, and key skills to enable them to develop as independent, reflective lifelong learners and able employees;
* Develop a broad context for future employment, in which graduates appreciate the continuing value of an education in the theory and practice of film and theatre.

The programme will thereby foster an atmosphere of intellectual inquiry in each discipline, by offering modules which encourage a stimulating interchange of ideas.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Learning Outcomes: Cognitive Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Understand embodied knowledge and learning methods

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Practical workshops and independent productions

Methods of Assessment

Assessed scenes, films, and productions

Demonstrate critical awareness of the main research methods used to collect and analyse data

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Specific teaching methods include tutor-led, student-led, self-directed study

Methods of Assessment

Essays submitted to a deadline

Understand the interplay between practice and theory in the discipline

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Resource-based learning, including library work and attendance at performances, workshops and rehearsals

Methods of Assessment

Individual presentations

Analyse and critically examine diverse forms of discourse and their effects on representation in the arts, media and public life

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Specific teaching methods include tutor-led, student-led, self-directed study

Methods of Assessment

Individual interviews and essays

Think reflexively and independently

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Classroom discussion and online interactions

Methods of Assessment

Edited commentaries on learning logs

Understand group dynamics and implement them in practical contexts

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Group work in performance and classroom presentations

Methods of Assessment

Assessed group presentations, films and performances

Engage with and interpret layers of meaning within film and drama and critical texts

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

A sensitivity to layers of meaning within film, theatre and related critical texts is developed in a range of modules. Discussion in class is devoted to interpreting and analysis of strategies in text and image in relation to their aesthetic and formal qualities, historical and cultural contexts, and implications for practical work.

Methods of Assessment

Written exercises, both formative and summative, such as long and short essays.

Contextualise from a variety of perspectives

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Screenings and readings of films and plays and independent research on film and theatre history.

Methods of Assessment

Written exercises, both formative and summative, such as long and short essays, segmental analysis, log-books and/or other exercises test the students’ ability to engage with, interpret, and contextualise image making strategies and critical content.

Demonstrate a capacity for critical reflection and judgment in the light of evidence and argument

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

In many modules, students give informal presentations on specific films, plays, and key theoretical concepts. Moreover, they are encouraged to refer to specific artworks and scholarship in order to form their own judgment and evaluation of the artwork or critical concept in question.

Methods of Assessment

Written exercises, both formative and summative, such as long and short essays, segmental analysis, log-books and/or other exercises test the students’ ability to engage
with, interpret, and contextualise image making strategies and critical content.

Work autonomously, manifested in self-direction, objective-setting, prioritising, self-discipline and time management

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Students are given a number of deadlines to which they are expected to work; thereby, they learn to prioritise assignments and projects, objectives, and activities generally.

Methods of Assessment

Working to deadlines to produce new written and practical film work.

Understand complex tasks and present appropriate solutions in written, oral and visual form

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

These skills are introduced in the first year of study, nurtured and commented upon at meetings with the students’ tutor, with guidance as to the direction of their studies and with a view to increasing the amount of autonomous learning, which the student undertakes. Advisers of Studies also contribute to this process, though in a more general fashion, in the wider context of the subject and in the sense in which it forms a component of the degree pathways followed by the student.

Methods of Assessment

In class presentation; production of film and theatre work in various forms; in-class critiques and formative feedback sessions.

Learning Outcomes: Knowledge & Understanding

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Demonstrate a wide knowledge and understanding of local and international film and performance practice and the cultures and societies from which this has arisen, including an understanding of:
* the histories, forms and traditions of performance and theoretical explanations of those histories;
* the technical, artistic, and commercial history of filmmaking worldwide
* historical and contemporary contexts of production, circulation and reception of performance;
* the work of key practitioners and theorists; traditional and contemporary critical perspectives on performance;
* the processes by which film and performance are created, realised and managed informed by practical experience.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Students are taught the history of film and drama in lectures, seminars and tutorials, and are then asked to engage with their learning through practical workshops in which they experiment with both historical and contemporary methods of film and performance practice.

Methods of Assessment

Essays submitted to a deadline, short film work and performances that demonstrate an understanding of history and theory through practice.

Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of contemporary technologies and their relationship to drama, theatre, performance, and academic research.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Resource-based learning, working with DVD and other recordings

Methods of Assessment

Individual presentations and marked essays

Demonstrate an understanding of how to analyse and discuss the conventions and practices involved in producing and performing dramatic and cinematic work

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Attendance at performances and viewing of films

Methods of Assessment

Individual Interviews and marked essays

Understand the aesthetic and formal qualities of film and visual art and their relation to meanings in particular cultural forms and contexts

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures, screenings, seminars, practical workshops; tutorials, group and individual project work, open and resource-based learning, multi-media and new media learning.

Methods of Assessment

Essays and exercises; examinations; individual presentations (both oral and technology-based); logbooks and/or portfolios, research exercises; critical self-evaluation; creative practice within both an individual and group context; tasks aimed at the assessment of film making skills.

Demonstrate an insight into the cultural and social ways in which aesthetic judgements are constructed and aesthetic processes experienced

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Large and small group and individual learning and teaching situations; tutor-led, student-led and independent learning sessions.

Methods of Assessment

Assigned written essays.

Show an awareness of a wide range of visual techniques, cultures and modes of reception

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The programme’s learning and teaching strategies are designed to consolidate and enhance the following skills; subject-knowledge acquisition, analysis and critical evaluation; use of a range of technology systems for accessing resources, literature, and for the acquisition of production skills.

Methods of Assessment

Practical classes use a range of assessments which include but are not limited to short film production, documentary film, experimental film, video essays, editing projects, screenwriting, cinematography exercises and other forms of moving image media outputs.

Understand the visual, verbal and audio conventions through which images, words and sounds make meaning in film and performance

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Knowledge and understanding are developed through lectures, tutorials, workshops, seminars (many of which will be enhanced by learning aids such as handouts, and key readings available online through Queen’s Online) and through the assessment and feedback process.
Lectures and tutorials together provide knowledge and the opportunity to discuss, evaluate and apply that knowledge to texts. Seminars offer the more sustained opportunity to debate and evaluate a breadth of knowledge gained independently from directed reading and from the sharing of resources and information. Extensive background reading is required throughout the pathway, developing students’ specialist knowledge of particular genres and periods of cinema, filmmaking and literature in addition to a broad base of knowledge about literary and cinematic history. Workshops are led by both specialist practice staff and industry tutors to explore best practice in film and theatre production, in a connected and integrated way to the rest of the programme.

Methods of Assessment

Assessed practice in the form of film and performance that demonstrates an understanding of form; assessed essays; examinations; seminar presentations.

Demonstrate an understanding of professional practices and traditions, and of the possibilities and constraints involved in film and theatre making processes

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

A substantial aspect of the learning is through practical work. The experiential learning involved in production has a number of core benefits. These include the development of realistic and pragmatic understandings of the challenges involved with production. The ability to develop crucial technical skills to empower creativity; a profound and thorough understanding of the parlance of production, which leads to greater insight and ability to articulate craft processes and action in close analysis and lastly these skills enhance employability.

Methods of Assessment

Screening and exhibition of film outputs, and public performances of plays and practical work. Completion of technical training in editing, lighting, sound, stage management, set and production. Script writing and project development skills. Pitching and conveying creative projects to assessed panels and in presentations.

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Demonstrate a high level of specific skills including the reading of written texts and how to effect transitions from page to stage and screen

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutor-led, student-led, self-directed modules in literature, theory and practice

Methods of Assessment

Assessed films and performances; Continuously assessed group presentations

Engage critically with creative practitioners, theorists, and be able to debate and apply these strategies within a subject discourse

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures, screenings, seminars, practical workshops; tutorials, group and individual project work, open and resource-based learning, multi-media and new media learning.

Methods of Assessment

Essays and exercises; examinations; individual presentations (both oral and technology-based); logbooks and/or portfolios; research exercises; critical self-evaluation; creative practice within both an individual and group context; tasks aimed at the assessment of film and theatre making skills.

Understand film and theatre forms and their historical precedents

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Large and small group and individual learning and teaching situations; tutor-led, student-led and independent learning sessions.

Methods of Assessment

Assessed films and performances that demonstrate student engagement with history and theory through practice. Timed written examinations, data analysis, essays, critical film and play reviews, portfolios, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions.

Analyse, interpret, and exercise critical judgement in the understanding of the subject area studied

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The programme’s learning and teaching strategies are designed to consolidate and enhance the following skills; subject-knowledge acquisition, analysis and critical evaluation; use of a range of technology systems for accessing resources, literature, and for the acquisition of production skills.

Methods of Assessment

Essays and exercises; examinations; individual presentations (both oral and technology-based); logbooks and/or portfolios; research exercises; critical self-evaluation; creative practice within both an individual and group context; tasks aimed at the assessment of film and theatre making skills.

Put to use a range of IT skills from basic competences such as word processing to more complex skills using multimedia, and develop proficiencies in utilising a range of image making technologies

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Industry standard software instruction is embedding in coursework. This empowers students to take external examinations in video and audio editing to an advanced level in film and television, and to demonstrate familiarity with state-of-the-art theatrical design technology.

Methods of Assessment

Video essay and editing exams, editing of film projects, documentaries. Advanced post production techniques such as picture grading and colour management software; exams in computer assisted design theatre lighting and set design software.

Read, analyse, document and/or interpret performance and film

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutor-led seminar discussions based on reading.

Methods of Assessment

Essays and scene-work

Participate in group processes in the creation of original work

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Contact with working professionals in all relevant specialisms (eg actors, director, designers, lighting designers, critics)

Methods of Assessment

Edited commentaries or learning logs

Understand processes by which films and performances are created, realised, and managed, such as the processes of rehearsal, writing, scoring, devising, scenography, improvisation, choreography, performer training techniques, and production arts

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Workshops and rehearsals; performances and films

Methods of Assessment

Assessed performances and films

Learning Outcomes: Transferable Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Demonstrate critical, analytical and physical skills

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Specific teaching methods include tutor-led, student-led, self-directed study

Methods of Assessment

Essays submitted to a deadline

Demonstrate creative and imaginative skills as shown through the realisation of practical research projects

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Resource-based learning, including library work, attendance at performances, and physical learning through workshop methods

Methods of Assessment

Continuously assessed group presentations

Communicate in a variety of oral, written, visual and performance media

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Students are given a variety of styles of assessment to challenge them to communicate knowledge through different means

Methods of Assessment

Summative group presentations; essays; assessed films and performances

Show an awareness of inter-disciplinary approaches to study, and the capacity to engage with different theories or paradigms of knowledge

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Modules in both film and theatre practice and theory, covering a broad range of time periods and artistic movements

Methods of Assessment

Essays; presentations; practical assignments

Demonstrate an understanding of the professional processes and practices of film and theatre production and the specific challenges of the various roles through which these occur

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Contact with working professionals in all relevant specialisms (eg actors, director, designers, lighting designers, critics)

Methods of Assessment

Individual interviews; essays; practical assignments

Negotiate and pursue goals with others

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Group work in performance and classroom presentations work in particular promotes good communication and team building skills. Working creatively, students have to create new and original work

Methods of Assessment

Assessed group presentations and performances; Participation and engagement

Demonstrate information retrieval skills, involving the ability to gather, sift, synthesise and organise material independently and critically evaluate its significance

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Research assignments are designed to encourage students to engage with historical, scholarly, and archival material and synthesise information from these and other sources.

Methods of Assessment

Assigned essays and presentations

Present knowledge and demonstrate expertise in a coherent, effective and meaningful form

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Individual and group presentations; seminars offer a variety of tutor-led and student-led learning opportunities as well as a more sustained opportunity to debate and evaluate a breadth of knowledge gained independently from directed reading and from the sharing of resources and information.

Methods of Assessment

Group presentations are used to encourage students to pursue their own interests and develop their understanding of a topic.

MODULE INFORMATION

Programme Requirements

Module Title

Module Code

Level/ stage

Credits

Availability

Duration

Pre-requisite

 

Assessment

 

 

 

 

S1

S2

 

 

Core

Option

Coursework %

Practical %

Examination %

Writing About Theatre: Theory, Criticism and Performance

DRA1001

1

20

24 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Introduction to Film Studies 1

FLM1001

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Introduction to Performing

DRA1003

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Advanced Film Practice 1

FLM3001

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

40%

60%

0%

Introduction to Contemporary Performing Practices

DRA1004

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Dissertation

DRA3025

3

20

24 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Dissertation

FLM3010

3

20

24 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Postconflict Drama: Performing the NI Peace Process

DRA3042

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Devising Theatre

DRA2005

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Avant-Garde Theatre

DRA2002

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Irish Theatre

DRA2009

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Introduction to Screenwriting

FLM2019

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

50%

50%

0%

Contemporary Cinema

FLM3018

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Advanced Film Practice 2

FLM3011

3

40

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

0%

100%

0%

Hollywood Cinema 1

FLM2001

2

20

YES

12 weeks

Y

YES

100%

0%

0%

The Art of the Actor

DRA2003

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

American Theatre

DRA2045

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Practical Theatre 2

DRA2004

2

20

24 weeks

Y

YES

100%

0%

0%

Introduction to Film Practice

FLM1004

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

40%

60%

0%

Advanced Theatre Practice

DRA3006

3

40

24 weeks

N

YES

30%

70%

0%

Theory and Practice of Adaptation

DRA3056

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Drama, Health and Social Care

DRA3057

3

20

24 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Editing for Film and Television

FLM1007

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

50%

50%

0%

Cinematography

FLM2025

2

20

YES

12 weeks

Y

YES

50%

50%

0%

Documentary Film

FLM2012

2

20

YES

12 weeks

Y

YES

100%

0%

0%

World Cinemas

FLM2013

2

20

YES

12 weeks

Y

YES

100%

0%

0%

Film and Music: Theory and Criticism

FLM3024

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Dance Theatre

DRA3060

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

30%

70%

0%

British Cinema: Nation, Identity and Industry

FLM2026

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Cinema and Postmodernism

FLM3031

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Introduction to Arts Management

SCA2002

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Educational Drama

DRA2007

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Production Practices

DRA1006

1

20

24 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Non-Fiction Film Practice

FLM2028

2

20

YES

12 weeks

Y

YES

60%

40%

0%

Performing the Classics

DRA3061

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

30%

70%

0%

Professional Practice

AEL3002

3

20

24 weeks

N

YES

40%

60%

0%

Work-based Learning

AEL3001

3

20

24 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Notes

Level 1 Students take either DRA1004 or DRA1006.

Level 2 Students will normally take 60 credits each from FLM-coded modules and DRA-coded modules; Students must also take at least 40 CATS points in Category A. Category A: DRA2002, DRA2045, DRA2009, SCA2002, FLM2001, FLM2013, FLM2012, FLM2026 Category B: DRA2022, DRA2005, DRA2004, FLM2025, FLM2028, FLM2019, DRA2010, DRA2003, DRA2007

Level 3 Students will normally take at least 20 credits each from FLM-coded modules and DRA-coded modules. Students must also take at least 40 CATS points in category A. Students will be expected to take at least one of the following modules: Advanced Theatre Practice, Professional Practice, or Advanced Film Practice 1. Students will normally be expected to focus on a single aspect of Film or Theatre practice (though for students interested in acting, this could include acting for screen) in final year practical modules. Category A: DRA3025, DRA3042, DRA3056, DRA3057, FLM3018, FLM3024, FLM3010, DRA3062 Category B: DRA3006, DRA3061, DRA3060, AEL3002, FLM3001, FLM3011, FLM3031, AEL3001