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BA English and Philosophy

Academic Year 2017/18

A programme specification is required for any programme on which a student may be registered. All programmes of the University are subject to the University's Quality Assurance and Enhancement processes as set out in the DASA Policies and Procedures Manual.

Programme Title

BA English and Philosophy

Final Award
(exit route if applicable for Postgraduate Taught Programmes)

Bachelor of Arts

Programme Code

ENG-BA-JS

UCAS Code

QV35

JACS Code

Q300 (DESCR) 50

Criteria for Admissions

The programme entry requirement is BBB at ‘A’ Level or equivalent, including grade B in English or grade A at ‘AS’ Level or equivalent. There are no subject specific requirements for Philosophy.
International candidates require at least a British Council IELTS qualification of 6.5 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in each component.

ATAS Clearance Required

No

Health Check Required

No

Portfolio Required

Interview Required

Mode of Study

Full Time

Type of Programme

Joint Honours Single

Length of Programme

3 Academic Year(s)

Total Credits for Programme

360

Exit Awards available

INSTITUTE INFORMATION

Awarding Institution/Body

Queen's University Belfast

Teaching Institution

Queen's University Belfast

School/Department

Arts, English and Languages

Framework for Higher Education Qualification Level 
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/publications/information-and-guidance

Level 6

QAA Benchmark Group
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/assuring-standards-and-quality/the-quality-code/subject-benchmark-statements

English (2015)

Accreditations (PSRB)

External Examiner Name:

External Examiner Institution/Organisation

Prof Lynda Mugglestone

Pembroke College Oxford

Dr Michael Bacon

Royal Holloway University of London

Dr James Gordon Finlayson

University of Sussex

Dr Karen Lury

University of Glasgow

Prof Kate Hodgkin

Bristol University

Dr Colin Graham

NUI Maynooth

REGULATION INFORMATION

Does the Programme have any approved exemptions from the University General Regulations
(Please see General Regulations)

N/A

Programme Specific Regulations

Each level must include 60 CATS in English and 60 credits in Philosophy.

Transferring from Single to Joint Honours:
On completing Level 1 a Single Honours student in either of English or Philosophy who has completed 40 CATS at Level 1 in the other subject and has achieved an average mark across the 40 CATS of 60 or above may be admitted to this Joint Honours Programme subject to having obtained the approval of the Adviser of Studies in the subject in which they have only 40 CATS.

Students with protected characteristics

N/A

Are students subject to Fitness to Practise Regulations

(Please see General Regulations)

No

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF PROGRAMME

The Joint Programme in English and Philosophy is designed to provide students with an intellectual training in the disciplines of English and Philosophy which, while discrete subjects, are also complementary and mutually enriching. It is designed to provide students with:

• a discipline-specific perspective enabling the acquisition of knowledge and understanding of the inter-relationship between texts and contexts, a familiarity with debates surrounding culture and identity, both individual and communal, and skills in synthesising and developing ideas and arguments from diverse literary and philosophical sources;

• a range of skills which together foster the ability to practise self-motivated learning and increase the capacity to undertake independent learning in a progressive way.

Together, these subjects together equip individuals with the ability to:

• think critically, process and understand complex information;

• evaluate primary and secondary sources;

• interpret a variety of types of data and information;

• pursue independent learning;

• work well in groups and formulate arguments.

Furthermore, students benefit from a multi-disciplinary education that gives them a large skill set and opens a wide range of career options following graduation.

The curricula will be delivered in accordance with the national English and Philosophy benchmarking statements: in English, these reflect the chronological, cultural, and generic diversity of English literary and language studies, drawing, where applicable, on the unique character of Northern Ireland, and taking advantage of a variety of critical and pedagogical approaches; in Philosophy, these standards reflect the distinctive aims and methods of a philosophical education together with its characteristic subject-matter.

More generally, the Joint Programme in English and Philosophy aims to:

• attract students from local, national, and international contexts, through a variety of entry routes, and deliver the best possible learning and teaching experience in an environment of equality, tolerance, and mutual respect;

• provide students with the necessary intellectual, practical, and key skills to enable them to develop as independent, reflective lifelong learners and able employees;

• develop a broad context for future employment, in which graduates appreciate the continuing value of an education in these two disciplines.

The programme will thereby foster an atmosphere of intellectual inquiry in each discipline, by offering modules that encourage a stimulating interchange of ideas.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Learning Outcomes: Cognitive Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

recognise and appreciate the varying effects of different literary and linguistic forms of expression;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Class discussion in which analysis and interpretation of texts takes place allows the students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material. It allows for both tutor- and student-led opportunities for the discussion and comprehension of directed reading and secondary source information.
Analytical literary-critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, contextualise, and interpret texts. The ability to collate and obtain information is developed through introductory training in the use of libraries and online resources.
Extended essays test their ability to order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which the presentation and prioritisation of material is conducive to its rhetorical effect.
In all modules, students are encouraged to refer to current critical and theoretical debate in order to form their own judgement of the text or data in question. They work towards a number of deadlines for formative and summative work, and for class presentation, thereby learning to prioritise assignments and objectives, and in doing so hone their time management skills.

Methods of Assessment

Progress through the degree is one in which the autonomous learning undertaken by students is gradually increased, from lecture/tutorial based teaching at stages 1 and 2, to student-centred learning, through 2- or 3-hour seminars, at stage 3.
Extended essays and the dissertation test students’ ability to order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which the presentation and prioritisation of material is conducive to its rhetorical effect. In all modules, students are encouraged to refer to current critical and theoretical debate in order to form their own judgement of the text or data in question.
Class discussion, in which analysis and interpretation of texts takes place, allows students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material.
Analytical literary-critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, contextualise, and interpret texts.
The dissertation, examinations and essays require students to demonstrate coverage of material, appropriate methods of analysis, the ability to discriminate between arguments, and the ability to form an independent argument.

Feedback is provided for each type and instance of assessment and students may seek dedicated feedback sessions with course tutors.
The Personal Tutor system facilitates student reflection upon academic performance and assists in developing strategies for improvement.

Learning Outcomes: Knowledge & Understanding

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

respond to, and differentiate between, different ideological and theoretical positions;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Class discussion in which analysis and interpretation of texts takes place allows the students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material. It allows for both tutor- and student-led opportunities for the discussion and comprehension of directed reading and secondary source information.
Analytical literary-critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, contextualise, and interpret texts. The ability to collate and obtain information is developed through introductory training in the use of libraries and online resources.
Extended essays test their ability to order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which the presentation and prioritisation of material is conducive to its rhetorical effect.
In all modules, students are encouraged to refer to current critical and theoretical debate in order to form their own judgement of the text or data in question. They work towards a number of deadlines for formative and summative work, and for class presentation, thereby learning to prioritise assignments and objectives, and in doing so hone their time management skills.

Methods of Assessment

Progress through the degree is one in which the autonomous learning undertaken by students is gradually increased, from lecture/tutorial based teaching at stages 1 and 2, to student-centred learning, through 2- or 3-hour seminars, at stage 3.
Extended essays and the dissertation test students’ ability to order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which the presentation and prioritisation of material is conducive to its rhetorical effect. In all modules, students are encouraged to refer to current critical and theoretical debate in order to form their own judgement of the text or data in question.
Class discussion, in which analysis and interpretation of texts takes place, allows students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material.
Analytical literary-critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, contextualise, and interpret texts.
The dissertation, examinations and essays require students to demonstrate coverage of material, appropriate methods of analysis, the ability to discriminate between arguments, and the ability to form an independent argument.

Feedback is provided for each type and instance of assessment and students may seek dedicated feedback sessions with course tutors.
The Personal Tutor system facilitates student reflection upon academic performance and assists in developing strategies for improvement.

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

analyse and interpret material from different geographical, cultural, and temporal contexts;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Class discussion in which analysis and interpretation of texts takes place allows the students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material. It allows for both tutor- and student-led opportunities for the discussion and comprehension of directed reading and secondary source information.
Analytical literary-critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, contextualise, and interpret texts. The ability to collate and obtain information is developed through introductory training in the use of libraries and online resources.
Extended essays test their ability to order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which the presentation and prioritisation of material is conducive to its rhetorical effect.
In all modules, students are encouraged to refer to current critical and theoretical debate in order to form their own judgement of the text or data in question. They work towards a number of deadlines for formative and summative work, and for class presentation, thereby learning to prioritise assignments and objectives, and in doing so hone their time management skills.

Methods of Assessment

Progress through the degree is one in which the autonomous learning undertaken by students is gradually increased, from lecture/tutorial based teaching at stages 1 and 2, to student-centred learning, through 2- or 3-hour seminars, at stage 3.
Extended essays and the dissertation test students’ ability to order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which the presentation and prioritisation of material is conducive to its rhetorical effect. In all modules, students are encouraged to refer to current critical and theoretical debate in order to form their own judgement of the text or data in question.
Class discussion, in which analysis and interpretation of texts takes place, allows students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material.
Analytical literary-critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, contextualise, and interpret texts.
The dissertation, examinations and essays require students to demonstrate coverage of material, appropriate methods of analysis, the ability to discriminate between arguments, and the ability to form an independent argument.

Feedback is provided for each type and instance of assessment and students may seek dedicated feedback sessions with course tutors.
The Personal Tutor system facilitates student reflection upon academic performance and assists in developing strategies for improvement.

Learning Outcomes: Transferable Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

think independently, originally, and self-reflexively;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Class discussion in which analysis and interpretation of texts takes place allows the students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material. It allows for both tutor- and student-led opportunities for the discussion and comprehension of directed reading and secondary source information.
Analytical literary-critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, contextualise, and interpret texts. The ability to collate and obtain information is developed through introductory training in the use of libraries and online resources.
Extended essays test their ability to order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which the presentation and prioritisation of material is conducive to its rhetorical effect.
In all modules, students are encouraged to refer to current critical and theoretical debate in order to form their own judgement of the text or data in question. They work towards a number of deadlines for formative and summative work, and for class presentation, thereby learning to prioritise assignments and objectives, and in doing so hone their time management skills.

Methods of Assessment

Progress through the degree is one in which the autonomous learning undertaken by students is gradually increased, from lecture/tutorial based teaching at stages 1 and 2, to student-centred learning, through 2- or 3-hour seminars, at stage 3.
Extended essays and the dissertation test students’ ability to order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which the presentation and prioritisation of material is conducive to its rhetorical effect. In all modules, students are encouraged to refer to current critical and theoretical debate in order to form their own judgement of the text or data in question.
Class discussion, in which analysis and interpretation of texts takes place, allows students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material.
Analytical literary-critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, contextualise, and interpret texts.
The dissertation, examinations and essays require students to demonstrate coverage of material, appropriate methods of analysis, the ability to discriminate between arguments, and the ability to form an independent argument.

Feedback is provided for each type and instance of assessment and students may seek dedicated feedback sessions with course tutors.
The Personal Tutor system facilitates student reflection upon academic performance and assists in developing strategies for improvement.

Learning Outcomes: Cognitive Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

demonstrate a capacity for critical reflection and judgment in the light of evidence and argument;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Class discussion in which analysis and interpretation of texts takes place allows the students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material. It allows for both tutor- and student-led opportunities for the discussion and comprehension of directed reading and secondary source information.
Analytical literary-critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, contextualise, and interpret texts. The ability to collate and obtain information is developed through introductory training in the use of libraries and online resources.
Extended essays test their ability to order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which the presentation and prioritisation of material is conducive to its rhetorical effect.
In all modules, students are encouraged to refer to current critical and theoretical debate in order to form their own judgement of the text or data in question. They work towards a number of deadlines for formative and summative work, and for class presentation, thereby learning to prioritise assignments and objectives, and in doing so hone their time management skills.

Methods of Assessment

Progress through the degree is one in which the autonomous learning undertaken by students is gradually increased, from lecture/tutorial based teaching at stages 1 and 2, to student-centred learning, through 2- or 3-hour seminars, at stage 3.
Extended essays and the dissertation test students’ ability to order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which the presentation and prioritisation of material is conducive to its rhetorical effect. In all modules, students are encouraged to refer to current critical and theoretical debate in order to form their own judgement of the text or data in question.
Class discussion, in which analysis and interpretation of texts takes place, allows students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material.
Analytical literary-critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, contextualise, and interpret texts.
The dissertation, examinations and essays require students to demonstrate coverage of material, appropriate methods of analysis, the ability to discriminate between arguments, and the ability to form an independent argument.

Feedback is provided for each type and instance of assessment and students may seek dedicated feedback sessions with course tutors.
The Personal Tutor system facilitates student reflection upon academic performance and assists in developing strategies for improvement.

discriminate between substantive and peripheral concerns in their understanding of literary and linguistic issues;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Class discussion in which analysis and interpretation of texts takes place allows the students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material. It allows for both tutor- and student-led opportunities for the discussion and comprehension of directed reading and secondary source information.
Analytical literary-critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, contextualise, and interpret texts. The ability to collate and obtain information is developed through introductory training in the use of libraries and online resources.
Extended essays test their ability to order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which the presentation and prioritisation of material is conducive to its rhetorical effect.
In all modules, students are encouraged to refer to current critical and theoretical debate in order to form their own judgement of the text or data in question. They work towards a number of deadlines for formative and summative work, and for class presentation, thereby learning to prioritise assignments and objectives, and in doing so hone their time management skills.

Methods of Assessment

Progress through the degree is one in which the autonomous learning undertaken by students is gradually increased, from lecture/tutorial based teaching at stages 1 and 2, to student-centred learning, through 2- or 3-hour seminars, at stage 3.
Extended essays and the dissertation test students’ ability to order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which the presentation and prioritisation of material is conducive to its rhetorical effect. In all modules, students are encouraged to refer to current critical and theoretical debate in order to form their own judgement of the text or data in question.
Class discussion, in which analysis and interpretation of texts takes place, allows students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material.
Analytical literary-critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, contextualise, and interpret texts.
The dissertation, examinations and essays require students to demonstrate coverage of material, appropriate methods of analysis, the ability to discriminate between arguments, and the ability to form an independent argument.

Feedback is provided for each type and instance of assessment and students may seek dedicated feedback sessions with course tutors.
The Personal Tutor system facilitates student reflection upon academic performance and assists in developing strategies for improvement.

MODULE INFORMATION

Programme Requirements

Module Title

Module Code

Level/ stage

Credits

Availability

Duration

Pre-requisite

 

Assessment

 

 

 

 

S1

S2

 

 

Core

Option

Coursework %

Practical %

Examination %

English in Transition

ENG1001

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Mapping the Anglo-Saxon World

ENG2003

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Philosophy and Human Nature

PHL1001

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

English in Context

ENG1002

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Knowledge and Reality

PHL2001

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

45%

0%

55%

Shakespeare on Screen

ENG3087

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Foundations for Speech Analysis: The Phonetics of English

ENL2001

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

50%

30%

20%

Speech Worlds: Phonology in Acquisition and Disorder

ENL3003

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Introduction to American Writing

ENG2072

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Language and Power

ENL2002

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

80%

0%

20%

History of English: Studying Language Change

ENL2004

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Late Medieval Literature

ENG2040

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Eighteenth-Century and Romantic Literature

ENG2062

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Modern Political Thought

PAI2005

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Contemporary Political Philosophy

PAI3025

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Philosophical Theology

PHL3034

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

45%

0%

55%

Introduction to Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama

ENG2050

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Literature and Society, 1850-1930

ENG2070

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Irish Literature

ENG2081

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Televising the Victorians

ENG3069

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Scholastic Ethics

PHL2008

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Mind and Language

PHL2026

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

35%

10%

55%

Philosophy of Law

PHL3015

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Moral Theories

PHL2000

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Issues in the Philosophy of Science

PHL3001

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

35%

10%

55%

Literature and Science in the Nineteenth Century: Evolution, Degeneration, and the Mind

ENG3097

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Double Dissertation English Literature

ENG3000

3

40

24 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Introduction to English Language

ENL1001

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Perspectives on Politics

PAI1007

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Contemporary US Crime Fiction: the Police, the State, the Globe

ENH3008

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Philosophy and The Good Life

PHL1004

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

35%

10%

55%

History of Philosophy

PHL2016

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Comic Fiction, Fielding to Austen (1740-1820)

ENH3013

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Applied Ethics

PHL3064

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

45%

0%

55%

Scholastic Metaphysics

PHL3040

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Marvels, Monsters and Miracles in Anglo-Saxon England

ENG3011

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Renaissance Performance, Gender, Space

ENG3181

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Contemporary Irish and Scottish Fiction Devolutionary Identities

ENG3060

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Broadcasting and Identity

ENL3002

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Picturing America: Shaping the States in Word and Image

ENG3061

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Introductory Logic

PHL1003

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

10%

35%

55%

The Structure of English

ENL3110

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Digital textualities and the History of the Book

ENG3178

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Topics in Epistemology

PHL3013

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Representing the Working Class

ENG3064

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Writing New York, 1880-1940

ENG3183

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Contemporary Literature: Poetry and Precariousness in the Twenty-First Century

ENG3184

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Irish Gothic

ENG3330

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Stevens & Bishop

ENG3333

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Philosophy for Children

PHL3068

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Introduction to the Philosophy of Science

PHL2027

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Writing Africa: The Colonial Past to Colonial Present

ENG3185

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Knowledge, Power and Imagination: Writing the East, 1662-1835

ENG3186

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Stylistics: Analysing Style in Language

ENL3011

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

An Introduction to Critical and Cultural Theory

ENG2000

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Discourses of Crime

ENL3111

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

70%

30%

0%

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Notes

In Philosophy students are required to take three from the list of Philosophy modules or PHL3099 (double weighted) plus one other Philosophy module

Level 1 In Philosophy students are required to take three from the list of Philosophy modules

Level 2 In Philosophy students are required to take three from the list of Philosophy modules