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BA Philosophy

Academic Year 2017/18

A programme specification is required for any programme on which a student may be registered. All programmes of the University are subject to the University's Quality Assurance and Enhancement processes as set out in the DASA Policies and Procedures Manual.

Programme Title

BA Philosophy

Final Award
(exit route if applicable for Postgraduate Taught Programmes)

Bachelor of Arts

Programme Code

PHL-BA-S

UCAS Code

V500

JACS Code

V500 (DESCR) 100

Criteria for Admissions

Entrance Requirements
A-level: BBB
For general information, see www.qub.ac.uk/pisp

ATAS Clearance Required

No

Health Check Required

No

Portfolio Required

Interview Required

Mode of Study

Full Time

Type of Programme

Single Honours

Length of Programme

3 Academic Year(s)

Total Credits for Programme

360

Exit Awards available

INSTITUTE INFORMATION

Awarding Institution/Body

Queen's University Belfast

Teaching Institution

Queen's University Belfast

School/Department

History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics

Framework for Higher Education Qualification Level 
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/publications/information-and-guidance

Level 6

QAA Benchmark Group
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/assuring-standards-and-quality/the-quality-code/subject-benchmark-statements

Philosophy (2015)

Accreditations (PSRB)

External Examiner Name:

External Examiner Institution/Organisation

Dr James Gordon Finlayson (Philosophy)

University of Sussex

Dr Michael Bacon

Royal Holloway University of London

REGULATION INFORMATION

Does the Programme have any approved exemptions from the University General Regulations
(Please see General Regulations)

No

Programme Specific Regulations

At Level II a student may substitute up to 20 CATS of optional modules with the equivalent number of CATS from a list of approved modules beyond those listed below.

At Level III a student may substitute up to 20 CATS of optional modules with the equivalent number of CATS from a list of approved modules beyond those listed below.

A student who has transferred onto this Single Honours programme having only completed 60 CATS at Level I in the Single Honours subject may at Level II or Level III substitute up to 20 CATS of optional modules with the equivalent number of CATS from a list of approved modules beyond those listed below.

On completing Level I a Joint Honours student who has passed 60 CATS at Level I in Philosophy modules may be admitted to this Single Honours programme having obtained the approval of the advisor of studies for the programme.

The admission requirement of BBB is waived provided students have passed achieved an average mark across the 60 CATS of 60 or above.

Students with protected characteristics

The School works with internship and placement providers and partner institutions to ensure that students with disabilities are able to complete residence abroad requirements.

Are students subject to Fitness to Practise Regulations

(Please see General Regulations)

No

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF PROGRAMME

• Philosophy is central to the intellectual understanding of the world and our place in it.

• This programme aims to provide a full grounding in logical, ethical, metaphysical and epistemological understanding and a flexible opportunity for study in the history of philosophy since ancient times.

• Students who have successfully completed their single honours pathway will have:

o acquired in depth a capacity for precision of thought and articulacy of expression in the analysis and formulation of complex and controversial problems;

o acquired the ability to construct and evaluate arguments in a rational and critical way;

o acquired an appreciation of wider perspectives;

o learned to direct their own studies, manage their own time, think independently, and meet deadlines.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Learning Outcomes: Cognitive Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

On successful completion of the Honours Programme in Philosophy, students will have acquired analytic and critical skills including the ability to:

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Teaching on the Honours Programme in Philosophy takes place in formal lectures, small group tutorials, and seminars, many of which will be enhanced by electronic media, including the facilities of Queen's On-line, and through the writing of formative and summative assessments. More specifically:

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions.

Ability to identify and solve, resolve or dissolve conceptual problems.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Student-centred learning situations encourage the ability to present and summarise knowledge to peers in a coherent, structured form, and to further enhance organisational and inter-personal skills.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions

Ability to analyse and criticise arguments, identifying fallacies therein.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Through class discussions, sometimes assigned to pairs or sub-groups, students develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material and the ability to formulate their own arguments and responses.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions

the ability to structure, manage and adapt strategies for self-directed independent research.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Group presentations are used to encourage students to pursue their own interests, collaborate with peers, negotiate the demands of teamwork and develop their understanding of a topic.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions

And with regard to the presentation of work, students will have acquired:

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Student-centred learning situations encourage the ability to present and summarise knowledge to peers in a coherent, structured form, and to further enhance organisational and inter-personal skills.

Methods of Assessment

Personal Development Planning facilitates student reflection upon academic performance and assists in developing strategies for improvement.

manage their own learning self critically;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures and tutorials together provide knowledge and the opportunity to discuss, evaluate and apply that knowledge to philosophical concepts. They also provide specific contextual and theoretical information as well as offering practical examples of different critical approaches.

Methods of Assessment

Feedback is provided for each type and instance of assessment and students may seek dedicated feedback sessions with course tutors.

synthesise relevant information and exercise critical judgement, primarily through essay writing;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Seminars offer a variety of tutor-led and student-led learning opportunities as well as a more sustained opportunity to debate and evaluate a breadth of knowledge gained independently from directed reading and from the sharing of resources and information.

Methods of Assessment

Extended essays test their ability to order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which to present and prioritise material.

identify, investigate, analyse, formulate and advocate solutions to problems;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Seminars offer a variety of tutor-led and student-led learning opportunities as well as a more sustained opportunity to debate and evaluate a breadth of knowledge gained independently from directed reading and from the sharing of resources and information.

Methods of Assessment

Group presentations are used to encourage students to pursue their own interests and develop their understanding of a topic.

gather, organise and deploy evidence and information from a variety of secondary and some primary sources, so as to formulate and support a line of reasoning, or argument;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Student-centred learning situations encourage the ability to present and summarise knowledge to peers in a coherent, structured form, and to further enhance organisational and inter-personal skills.

Methods of Assessment

Written exams help students gain a knowledge of a topic that can be readily and directly applied to a set problem or question, and also test their ability to select relevant information and to write clearly and concisely within a set time.

make judgments on the basis of varied and problematic evidence and according to the persuasiveness of the arguments or the reliability of the evidence used.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Writing skills tutorials and lectures develop essay-writing on stylistic, structural, rhetorical and bibliographical levels. The ability to collate and obtain information is developed through introductory training in the use of libraries and online resources.

Methods of Assessment

Examinations and essays require that students demonstrate coverage of material, appropriate methods of analysis, the ability to discriminate between arguments, and the ability to form an independent argument.

evaluate sources critically in their context;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Student-centred learning situations encourage the ability to present and summarise knowledge to peers in a coherent, structured form, and to further enhance organisational and inter-personal skills.

Methods of Assessment

The different methods of assessment serve different, but complementary, purposes:

discriminate between what is central and what is peripheral to the issue in question;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Class presentations and student interaction in small group sessions (e.g. tutorials or seminars) hone communication and rhetorical skills.

Methods of Assessment

Module guides and UG Handbooks inform students in their choice of, access to, and citation of relevant secondary materials.

assess and appraise differing views on significant areas of academic debate;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Through class discussions, sometimes assigned to pairs or sub-groups, students develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material and the ability to formulate their own arguments and responses.

Methods of Assessment

While these teaching and assessment methods deliver information to students and test their knowledge of that information in each subject, students are encouraged to assimilate and apply knowledge of both disciplines discretely to become independent, self-reflective learners.

synthesise diverse primary evidence and subsequent academic comment;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Dissertation work is a programme of independent study agreed between student and supervisor, leading to the writing and submission of an extended essay (thesis).

Methods of Assessment

All these assessment methods require students to demonstrate the subject skills which are detailed in each School’s criteria for marking undergraduate work.

work autonomously;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Group presentations are used to encourage students to pursue their own interests, collaborate with peers, negotiate the demands of teamwork and develop their understanding of a topic.

Methods of Assessment

Analytical, discursive, interpretive and critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, analyse, contextualise, interpret and criticise relevant material.

exercise sound, reasoned judgment;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Seminars offer a variety of tutor-led and student-led learning opportunities as well as a more sustained opportunity to debate and evaluate a breadth of knowledge gained independently from directed reading and from the sharing of resources and information.

Methods of Assessment

Formative written work assists the development of understanding, critical judgment, and independent thought, both through the feedback given, and through the process of writing itself.

be self-reflective;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures and tutorials together provide knowledge and the opportunity to discuss, evaluate and apply that knowledge to philosophical concepts. They also provide specific contextual and theoretical information as well as offering practical examples of different critical approaches.

Methods of Assessment

These vary in accordance with the specific learning outcomes of particular modules as set out in the individual module descriptions.

reflect on their own learning and seek and make use of constructive feedback;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures and tutorials together provide knowledge and the opportunity to discuss, evaluate and apply that knowledge to philosophical concepts. They also provide specific contextual and theoretical information as well as offering practical examples of different critical approaches.

Methods of Assessment

Coursework is required to be submitted in a specified form and to fixed deadlines, thus teaching students to learn to prioritise assignments and objectives and to hone their organisational and time-management skills.

the capacity to produce intellectually coherent academic analysis under time-managed conditions and within word limits;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Through class discussions, sometimes assigned to pairs or sub-groups, students develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material and the ability to formulate their own arguments and responses.

Methods of Assessment

A major learning resource for students is the state-of-the-art the McClay library.

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

• an ability to read and interact with seminal philosophical texts, in appreciation of their philosophical insights and modes of argument;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Teaching on the Honours Programme in Philosophy takes place in formal lectures, small group tutorials, and seminars, many of which will be enhanced by electronic media, including the facilities of Queen's On-line, and through the writing of formative and summative assessments. More specifically:

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions.

• for those who do the formal logic modules, an ability to understand and manipulate symbols in formal languages.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Writing skills tutorials and lectures develop essay-writing on stylistic, structural, rhetorical and bibliographical levels. The ability to collate and obtain information is developed through introductory training in the use of libraries and online resources.

Methods of Assessment

Essays and examinations in Semester 2 require that students demonstrate coverage of material, appropriate methods of analysis, the ability to discriminate between arguments, and the ability to form an independent argument.

• an ability to research philosophical topics using appropriate tools and resources.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Student-centred learning situations encourage the ability to present and summarise knowledge to peers in a coherent, structured form, and to further enhance organisational and inter-personal skills.

Methods of Assessment

The different methods of assessment serve different, but complementary, purposes:

• expertise in engaging with influential primary and secondary sources in philosophy, according to contemporary canons of academic debate and critical analysis;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Class presentations and student interaction in small group sessions (e.g. tutorials or seminars) hone communication and rhetorical skills.

Methods of Assessment

Module guides and BA Handbooks inform students in their choice of, access to, and citation of relevant secondary materials.

• a capacity for formulating clear and logical thought concerning fundamental philosophical issues and for expressing this in cogent, well-structured and intellectually rigorous essays;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Through class discussions, sometimes assigned to pairs or sub-groups, students develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material and the ability to formulate their own arguments and responses.

Methods of Assessment

While these teaching and assessment methods deliver information to students and test their knowledge of that information in each subject, students are encouraged to assimilate and apply knowledge of both disciplines discretely to become independent, self-reflective learners.

• an awareness of key debates arising out of philosophical inquiry, conducted in its various domains;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Dissertation work is a programme of independent study agreed between student and supervisor, leading to the writing and submission of an extended essay (thesis).

Methods of Assessment

All these assessment methods require students to demonstrate the subject skills which are detailed in each School’s criteria for marking undergraduate work.

• a familiarity with the forms, function, and development of philosophical discourse and methodology, together with an ability to analyse and utilise these;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Group presentations are used to encourage students to pursue their own interests, collaborate with peers, negotiate the demands of teamwork and develop their understanding of a topic.

Methods of Assessment

Analytical, discursive, interpretive and critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, analyse, contextualise, interpret and criticise relevant material.

• an ability to deploy tools of philosophical reasoning, including logical and conceptual analysis, in order to assess and formulate philosophical arguments and ideas;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Seminars offer a variety of tutor-led and student-led learning opportunities as well as a more sustained opportunity to debate and evaluate a breadth of knowledge gained independently from directed reading and from the sharing of resources and information.

Methods of Assessment

Formative written work assists the development of understanding, critical judgment, and independent thought, both through the feedback given, and through the process of writing itself.

• an ability to conduct constructive critical debate with rigour and objectivity, drawing on, and engaging with, differing critical perspectives when analysing texts;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures and tutorials together provide knowledge and the opportunity to discuss, evaluate and apply that knowledge to philosophical concepts. They also provide specific contextual and theoretical information as well as offering practical examples of different critical approaches.

Methods of Assessment

These vary in accordance with the specific learning outcomes of particular modules as set out in the individual module descriptions.

Learning Outcomes: Transferable Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

show self-reliance, initiative, adaptability and flexibility.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Teaching on the Honours Programme in Philosophy takes place in formal lectures, small group tutorials, and seminars, many of which will be enhanced by electronic media, including the facilities of Queen's On-line, and through the writing of formative and summative assessments.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions

communicate and interact effectively;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Teaching on the Honours Programme in Philosophy takes place in formal lectures, small group tutorials, and seminars, many of which will be enhanced by electronic media, including the facilities of Queen's On-line, and through the writing of formative and summative assessments.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions

use IT skills (word processing, use of internet resources);

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Teaching on the Honours Programme in Philosophy takes place in formal lectures, small group tutorials, and seminars, many of which will be enhanced by electronic media, including the facilities of Queen's On-line, and through the writing of formative and summative assessments.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions

use libraries and online resources;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Teaching on the Honours Programme in Philosophy takes place in formal lectures, small group tutorials, and seminars, many of which will be enhanced by electronic media, including the facilities of Queen's On-line, and through the writing of formative and summative assessments.

Methods of Assessment

A major learning resource for students is the state-of-the-art the McClay library and related Queen’s Online.

take notes and summarise accurately and effectively;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Teaching on the Honours Programme in Philosophy takes place in formal lectures, small group tutorials, and seminars, many of which will be enhanced by electronic media, including the facilities of Queen's On-line, and through the writing of formative and summative assessments.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions

respond constructively to criticism;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Teaching on the Honours Programme in Philosophy takes place in formal lectures, small group tutorials, and seminars, many of which will be enhanced by electronic media, including the facilities of Queen's On-line, and through the writing of formative and summative assessments.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions

manage time efficiently;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Teaching on the Honours Programme in Philosophy takes place in formal lectures, small group tutorials, and seminars, many of which will be enhanced by electronic media, including the facilities of Queen's On-line, and through the writing of formative and summative assessments.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions

work effectively both independently and in a team setting;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Teaching on the Honours Programme in Philosophy takes place in formal lectures, small group tutorials, and seminars, many of which will be enhanced by electronic media, including the facilities of Queen's On-line, and through the writing of formative and summative assessments.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions

present ideas and arguments orally in both formal and informal contexts;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Teaching on the Honours Programme in Philosophy takes place in formal lectures, small group tutorials, and seminars, many of which will be enhanced by electronic media, including the facilities of Queen's On-line, and through the writing of formative and summative assessments.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions

use their knowledge in cogent, communicable ways to present arguments and clarify complex issues in both oral and written forms;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Teaching on the Honours Programme in Philosophy takes place in formal lectures, small group tutorials, and seminars, many of which will be enhanced by electronic media, including the facilities of Queen's On-line, and through the writing of formative and summative assessments.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions

collate and process information from an array of sources, including electronic media;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Writing skills tutorials and lectures develop essay-writing on stylistic, structural, rhetorical and bibliographical levels. The ability to collate and obtain information is developed through introductory training in the use of libraries and online resources.

Methods of Assessment

Essays and Semester 2 examinations require that students demonstrate coverage of material, appropriate methods of analysis, the ability to discriminate between arguments, and the ability to form an independent argument.

reflect on intellectual and professional priorities;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Student-centred learning situations encourage the ability to present and summarise knowledge to peers in a coherent, structured form, and to further enhance organisational and inter-personal skills.

Methods of Assessment

The different methods of assessment serve different, but complementary, purposes:

understand the role and use of feedback in assessing and improving performance;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Class presentations and student interaction in small group sessions (e.g. tutorials or seminars) hone communication and rhetorical skills.

Methods of Assessment

Module guides and UG Handbooks inform students in their choice of, access to, and citation of relevant secondary materials.

make oral and group presentations using appropriate skills;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Through class discussions, sometimes assigned to pairs or sub-groups, students develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material and the ability to formulate their own arguments and responses.

Methods of Assessment

While these teaching and assessment methods deliver information to students and test their knowledge of that information in each subject, students are encouraged to assimilate and apply knowledge of both disciplines discretely to become independent, self-reflective learners.

present high-quality analysis cogently and succinctly;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Dissertation work is a programme of independent study agreed between student and supervisor, leading to the writing and submission of an extended essay (thesis).

Methods of Assessment

All these assessment methods require students to demonstrate the subject skills which are detailed in each School’s criteria for marking undergraduate work.

evaluate and judge evidence and the quality of information

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Group presentations are used to encourage students to pursue their own interests, collaborate with peers, negotiate the demands of teamwork and develop their understanding of a topic.

Methods of Assessment

Analytical, discursive, interpretive and critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, analyse, contextualise, interpret and criticise relevant material.

digest material from various sources;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Seminars offer a variety of tutor-led and student-led learning opportunities as well as a more sustained opportunity to debate and evaluate a breadth of knowledge gained independently from directed reading and from the sharing of resources and information.

Methods of Assessment

Formative written work assists the development of understanding, critical judgment, and independent thought, both through the feedback given, and through the process of writing itself.

work under time-pressure and to deadlines;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures and tutorials together provide knowledge and the opportunity to discuss, evaluate and apply that knowledge to philosophical concepts. They also provide specific contextual and theoretical information as well as offering practical examples of different critical approaches.

Methods of Assessment

These vary in accordance with the specific learning outcomes of particular modules as set out in the individual module descriptions.

On successful completion of the Honours Programme in Philosophy, students will acquire a repertoire of skills which are transferable to each other as well as other areas of endeavour and enterprise, including in their future careers, specifically the ability to:

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Teaching on the Honours Programme in Philosophy takes place in formal lectures, small group tutorials, and seminars, many of which will be enhanced by electronic media, including the facilities of Queen's On-line, and through the writing of formative and summative assessments. More specifically:

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions.

Learning Outcomes: Knowledge & Understanding

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

• acquired knowledge of many sub-fields in the discipline including metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of religion, philosophy of language, and philosophy of mind.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

These sub-fields are covered in core modules throughout levels 1 and 2, as well as optional modules at level 3.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions

• acquired knowledge and understanding of the application of philosophy to practical issues, for example in the area of applied ethics.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Practical and applied aspects are covered in each of the value based modules, and there is a specific Applied Ethics module offered at level 3.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions

• acquired knowledge and understanding of some of the central problems and issues in contemporary philosophy.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Contemporary philosophy is covered throughout all levels of the programme. At level 3 there is a particular emphasis on the latest, cutting edge research in philosophy.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions

• acquired an understanding of some of the key texts and ideas in the history of western philosophy;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

History of philosophy is covered throughout all levels of the programme, and there are three History focused modules offered.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions

• developed an understanding of the key concepts and tools that are used in philosophical reasoning;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Teaching in Philosophy takes place in formal lectures, small group tutorials, and seminars, many of which will be enhanced by electronic media, including the facilities of Queen's On-line, and through the writing of formative and summative assessments.

Methods of Assessment

Assessment is by a variety of traditional and innovative methods, including timed unseen written examinations, essays, individual and group presentations, and seminar and tutorial reports and contributions

MODULE INFORMATION

Programme Requirements

Module Title

Module Code

Level/ stage

Credits

Availability

Duration

Pre-requisite

 

Assessment

 

 

 

 

S1

S2

 

 

Core

Option

Coursework %

Practical %

Examination %

Philosophy and Human Nature

PHL1001

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

35%

10%

55%

Knowledge and Reality

PHL2001

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

35%

10%

55%

Modern Political Thought

PAI2005

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Contemporary Political Philosophy

PAI3025

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Philosophical Theology

PHL3034

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

35%

10%

55%

Scholastic Ethics

PHL2008

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Mind and Language

PHL2026

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Philosophy of Law

PHL3015

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Moral Theories

PHL2000

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Issues in the Philosophy of Science

PHL3001

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

35%

10%

55%

Dissertation

PHL3099

3

40

24 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Perspectives on Politics

PAI1007

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Philosophy and The Good Life

PHL1004

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

35%

10%

55%

History of Philosophy

PHL2016

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Applied Ethics

PHL3064

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Scholastic Metaphysics

PHL3040

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Introductory Logic

PHL1003

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

35%

10%

55%

Topics in Epistemology

PHL3013

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Philosophy for Children

PHL3068

3

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Introduction to the Philosophy of Science

PHL2027

2

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

90%

10%

0%

Notes

Stage 1: Students are required to take FOUR modules from the list below PLUS TWO modules from those available across the faculty. These may include other modules offered by PISP.

Stage 2: Students take SIX Level 2 modules.

Stage 3: Students take PHL3099 Dissertation plus FOUR modules from below.