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MB Medicine

Academic Year 2017/18

A programme specification is required for any programme on which a student may be registered. All programmes of the University are subject to the University's Quality Assurance and Enhancement processes as set out in the DASA Policies and Procedures Manual.

Programme Title

MB Medicine

Final Award
(exit route if applicable for Postgraduate Taught Programmes)

Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery and BAO

Programme Code

MED-MB-S

UCAS Code

A100

JACS Code

A100 (DESCR) 40

Criteria for Admissions

For current general University entry requirements for this pathway go to http://www.qub.ac.uk/ado

Criteria for Admission (Subject Specific Requirements) to Programme:
Entry requirements for this pathway are 3 A-Levels and an AS-Level.
Subject-specific requirements for this pathway are:
A-Level: Chemistry and at least one other science chosen from Physics, Biology and Maths (NB only 1 mathematics subject can count at A-level and General Studies is not acceptable).
AS Level: Biology to at least AS level is required.
GCSE: Physics (or Double Award Science) if not taken to AS level or A-level.
Candidates must take the UKCAT test. An interview will be required as part of the Admissions process.
Admission is subject to satisfactory police and health checks: see General Regulations of the University with regard to health of students and patients.
Additional Relevant Information
General Information:
The MB BCh BAO is a primary medical qualification (PMQ). Holding a PMQ entitles a graduate to apply for provisional registration with the General Medical Council (GMC). Provisionally registered doctors can only practise in approved Foundation Year 1 posts. To obtain a Foundation Year 1 post students apply during the final year of their undergraduate course through the UK Foundation Programme Office selection scheme which allocates these posts to graduates on a competitive basis. Successful completion of the Foundation Year 1 programme is normally achieved within 12 months and is marked by the award of a Certificate of Experience. Provisionally registered doctors are then eligible to apply for full registration with the GMC and this is required for unsupervised medical practice in the NHS or private practice in the UK.

Opportunities to Study for Intercalated Degree Programmes:
Students have the option of applying to study for an intercalated degree at QUB or in other European universities.

Opportunities to Study Abroad:
Students may apply to participate in the Erasmus Programme normally during year four. This programme offers students an opportunity to study clinical subjects at another European Medical School.

Support for Students and their Learning:
In addition to University Student Support Services, students and their learning are supported in the following ways:

School Support Services: 1. Student Support WEB site; 2. student support and Guidance Scheme; 3. Designated hospital Pastoral Tutors

Support for Learning: 1. Study guides outlining the learning and assessment requirements are available for all parts of the course. 2. A core skills course is offered to all first year students, which includes learning skills, computer and other IT skills, group working, core statistical skills as well as skills in evaluative and reflective writing and other modes of communication. 3. Advice on study skills and examination technique is provided.
For Further Information Refer To:
Centre for Medical Education
Whitla Medical Building
Lisburn Road
Belfast BT9 7BL

www.qub.ac.uk/schools/mdbs
Tel: +44 (0) 28 90972450
medicaled@qub.ac.uk

ATAS Clearance Required

No

Health Check Required

Yes

Portfolio Required

Interview Required

Interviews are mandatory as part of the selection procedure

Mode of Study

Full Time

Type of Programme

Single Honours

Length of Programme

5 Academic Year(s)

Total Credits for Programme

650

Exit Awards available

INSTITUTE INFORMATION

Awarding Institution/Body

Queen's University Belfast

Teaching Institution

Queen's University Belfast

School/Department

Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences

Framework for Higher Education Qualification Level 
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/publications/information-and-guidance

Level 7

QAA Benchmark Group
http://www.qaa.ac.uk/assuring-standards-and-quality/the-quality-code/subject-benchmark-statements

Medicine (2002)

Accreditations (PSRB)

General Medical Council

Date of most recent Accreditation Visit 04-04-17

External Examiner Name:

External Examiner Institution/Organisation

Dr S Hibbitts

Cardiff University

Dr J Ibison

St George’s, University of London

Dr P Lazarus

University of Leicester

Dr P Leftwick

Dr P Leftwick University of Liverpool

Dr M Okorie

Brighton and Sussex Medical School

Dr P Smith

University of Liverpool

Dr N Cohen

King's College London

Dr A Clark

University of Liverpool

REGULATION INFORMATION

Does the Programme have any approved exemptions from the University General Regulations
(Please see General Regulations)

Yes STUDY REGULATIONS: 1.3.5 and 1.4.63 – in fourth and fifth year Medicine a limit has been put on the number of modules which can be retaken in-year. 1.4.24 – The pass mark for the professional examinations in Medicine shall be 50%. The medical degree is not classified. The programme is therefore exempt from all regulations relating to classification, predominance and the undergraduate conceptual equivalent scale. 1.4.54 Regulations for award of an Aegrotat Degree do not normally apply.

Programme Specific Regulations

Awards, Credits and Progression of Learning Objectives
The following regulations should be read in conjunction with the University’s general regulations.
Examinations
1. The degrees of MB BCh BAO are the primary degrees in medicine, surgery and obstetrics and shall be conferred at the same time and after the same course of study. No student shall be admitted to the Final Part II examination for these degrees until they have shown (1) that they are a matriculated student of the University and (2) that they have satisfactorily completed the first four years of the medical curriculum.
2. The primary degrees of MB BCh and BAO shall not be conferred upon any person who has not attended in the University during three academic years the courses of study prescribed for such degrees. The University may accept not more than two academic years of the required total, approved courses of study pursued in any other University or School of Medicine or School of Dentistry.
3. Attendance: Students are expected to attend all scheduled sessions and other forms of instruction as defined by the programme of study. This is a general University regulation. The pathway of medicine includes practical as well as theoretical elements. Practical courses may include clinical procedures for which a student must be present to enable the School to discharge its statutory duty regarding satisfactory standards of training for the care and safety of patients. Students are thus expected to record a satisfactory level of attendance at all classes, whether or not this is stated in the individual course study guides. As a general guide, all absences must normally be accounted for. For students experiencing genuine difficulties eg illness, a minimum attendance of 75% will be expected. For all other students, attendance at 100% is normally required in keeping with the professional nature of the course. In cases of occasional absence, students must normally consult the module co-ordinator and/or their Adviser of Studies (or equivalent) prior to the absence for advice on remedial action. Where a student's attendance is unsatisfactory, Advisers of Studies (or equivalent) will normally interview the student and advise on the best course of action. Where attendance at a clinical module is unsatisfactory the Exam Board will require the student to attend additional sessions as necessary.
4. Every candidate for the primary degrees in Medicine shall be required to show that they attained the age of 21 years on or before the day of graduation.
5. It should be noted that modules referred to in the medical course are clinical modules and not standard University modules.
6. The degree of BMedSc Honours is only available to medical or dental students who successfully complete a minimum of the first three years of the course but do not complete the full degree for whatever reason. The Honours classification shall be determined by using the weighted marks for all the modules taken in the first three years of the course.
7. Notwithstanding the Regulations for formal written examinations, students will not normally be permitted to enter an OSCE or practical after the appointed time.
8. Where a student has attained an overall pass mark for a module but has not achieved a satisfactory performance in all the specified compulsory elements the result may at the discretion of the Board of Examiners be recorded as incomplete.
9. In all cases of failure or incompletion, the Board of Examiners will be responsible for deciding whether the whole module or only specified components should be repeated. The Board of Examiners will be responsible for making all decisions regarding progress.
10. Students will not be permitted to proceed from one year of the course to the next unless a satisfactory performance has been achieved in all elements of the preceding year.
11. Unless there are extenuating circumstances, a student may repeat only one academic year during the undergraduate medical course.
12. A student who fails any module on two occasions will normally be required to withdraw from the programme.
13. Standard setting: The undergraduate medical course has standard setting for all core examinations. The overall result of the module will be adjusted, if required, to a 50% pass mark.

Year 5: The Standard Error of Measurement is applied to Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) and written examinations. For the OSCEs students will also have to achieve the cut score determined by standard setting and will have to pass a minimum number of stations as defined in the module descriptor.
Years 2 to 4: The Standard Error of Measurement is applied to all OSCEs and may be applied to written examinations. For the OSCEs students will also have to achieve the cut score determined by standard setting and will have to pass a minimum number of stations as defined in the module descriptors.
Year 1: The Standard Error of Measurement is applied to all OSCEs and may be applied to written examinations. For the OSCEs students will also have to achieve the cut score determined by standard setting.
14. Serious Concern Reporting: During OSCE based assessments in the clinical years of the course examiners may use a Serious Concern Reporting card to record instances of unprofessional behaviour or clinical practice that may compromise patient safety. These cards will be reviewed by a sub-group of the Board of Examiners. Where the student has achieved an overall pass in the examination but there remains serious cause for concern, the sub-group may recommend that the Board of Examiners refers a candidate’s result pending feedback and remediation. Where the student has failed the examination there will be separate feedback and remediation relating to the specific concern, over and above that required for repeat of the examination. In exceptional circumstances at Final MB Part II the Board of Examiners may decide to fail a candidate if the concern regarding patient safety is such that the student should not be permitted to progress to graduation.
15. Distinction:

Distinctions will normally be awarded to the top 10% of students (approximately) achieving an average of 70% and above, based on the weighted marks in the core modules:

One for Years 1 & 2 combined
One for Year 3
One for Year 4 on the basis of the combined OSCE and Written paper results
One for Medicine and Surgery awarded at Final MB Part II based on Final MB Part I and II combined. Final MB Part I and II incorporates Reproductive Medicine and Healthcare of Children.

Students must have passed all courses at the first attempt in keeping with the professional nature of the course.
16. Honours will be awarded to students who are both in the top 10% of the year in accordance with the decile calculations used as part of the Educational Performance Measurement in applications for Foundation Year 1; and have achieved a Distinction at Final MB. Students must pass all final year courses at first attempt in keeping with the professional nature of the course. The decile rank is calculated on the basis of performance in the first four years of the degree. Full details of decile calculations and EPM are published on https://www.med.qub.ac.uk/portal/phpBB/.
17. Student Selected Components
17.1 Student Selected Components will not be included in the award of distinctions. In order to be eligible for an award of Merit, students must have passed all Student Selected Components at the first attempt in keeping with the professional nature of the course. The award of Merit will be given to the top 10% of students based on an aggregate of all the marks achieved in the Student Selected Components offered during years 1 to 3.

17.2 Attendance: 100% attendance is normally required in keeping with the professional nature of the course. Those who fail to satisfy the attendance requirements will normally be required to undertake additional learning/assessment activities.
18. Sponsio Academica
All graduands in medicine are normally required to make the following declaration:
"I do solemnly declare that as a graduate in Medicine of Queen's University Belfast, I will:
Make the care of my patients my first concern, keep my professional knowledge up to date, and recognise the limits of my professional competences;
Treat each patient with respect and dignity;
Treat each patient considerately, respect their views, provide them with information and involve them in decisions about their care;
Work collaboratively with colleagues in other healthcare professions in ways that best serve my patients' interests;
Treat with respect and willingly assist all students and trainees in their learning so that they may acquire skills and competences necessary for good clinical care;
Be honest and trustworthy, protect confidentiality, ensure that my personal beliefs do not compromise my patients’ care, act quickly to protect my patients from risk, and never abuse my position as a doctor.
In all these matters I will never discriminate unfairly against my patients or colleagues.
I will hold in due regard the honourable obligations of the medical profession doing nothing which would bring it into disrepute.
Above all, I dedicate my professional life to the service of those entrusted to my care."
19. By the provisions of the Medical Act 1983 a graduate must obtain certificates of satisfactory service over twelve months as a Foundation doctor. Details of the requirements may be obtained from the Northern Ireland Medical and Dental Training Agency.

First Year
1. All students will be required to take 6 modules (4 worth 20 CATS points each, one worth 30 CATS points and one worth 10 CATS points) and complete a Personal and Professional Development Portfolio (MED1012, zero CATS points).
2. Examinations will be held at the end of the year with supplementary examinations in August.
3. Students who fail the end of year examinations will be allowed to proceed to resit examinations in August.
4. Students who are required to repeat the year and have to repeat the Student Selected Component (MED1021, 10 CATS points) may choose a different Student Selected Component for their repeat year. Students will be allowed only one attempt at the assessment of this module, whichever module they choose.
5. The formative Personal and Professional Development Portfolio must be submitted by the agreed deadline. If students do not submit the Personal and Professional Development Portfolio by the agreed deadline, and do not have a valid reason for non-submission, they will be required to submit it and do an additional piece of work during the summer months as directed by the course coordinator. If students do not submit a Personal and Professional Development Portfolio on a second occasion, they will be required to meet with the Student Professionalism Committee to review their professional attitude and to undertake any additional work recommended by the Committee. Any failure to comply with the Committee’s requirements may lead to the student being referred to the Fitness to Practise Committee.

Second Year
1. All students will be required to take 7 modules (5 worth 20 CATS points each and 2 worth 10 CATS points each), The Year 1 & 2 Integrated Case Based Assessment (MED2011, zero CATS points) and complete a Personal and Professional Development Portfolio (MED2018, zero CATS points).
2. Examinations will be held at the end of each semester with supplementary examinations in August.
3. Students who fail the end of semester examinations will be allowed to proceed to resit examinations in August.
4. Students who are required to repeat the year and have to repeat the Student Selected Component may choose a different Student Selected Component (MED2016 or MED2017, 10 CATS points) for their repeat year. Students will be allowed only one attempt at the assessment of this module, whichever they choose.
5. The Personal and Professional Development Portfolio must be submitted by the agreed deadline. Candidates who have not reached a satisfactory standard in the portfolio at first attempt will be permitted to resubmit the portfolio for the resit examinations in August.

Third Year

1. All students are required to take two Student Selected Components (MED3012, 10 CATS points and MED3013, 10 CATS points), the Scientific Basis of Clinical Practice (MED3014, 20 CATS points), the Clinical Practice Module (MED3015, 80 CATS points) and a Personal and Professional Development Portfolio (MED3016, zero CATS points).
2. Student Selected Components will be taught in three week blocks at the start of each semester and assessed on completion. Those who fail to satisfy the attendance requirements will normally be required to remediate the attendance missed.
3. The Scientific Basis of Clinical Practice and the Clinical Practice Module are taught throughout the year and examined at the end of the second semester.
4. The Personal and Professional Development Portfolio must be submitted during the spring semester by the published closing date. Students who have not reached a satisfactory standard in the portfolio at first attempt will be permitted to resubmit the Portfolio by the published resubmission deadline.
5. Supplementary examinations will be held in August.
6. Regulations governing progress:

6.1 Students who fail the end of semester examinations will be allowed to proceed to resit examinations in August.

6.2 100% attendance at clinical sessions in each discipline within the Clinical Module is normally required in keeping with the professional nature of the course. Where attendance is not satisfactory the Exam Board will require students to attend additional clinical sessions. If it is not possible to redeem the attendance candidates may be required to re-enter third year in order to retake all the classes and examinations of this module.

6.3 The Portfolio must be passed in order for the student to progress to the next stage of the course.

6.4 Candidates who are required to repeat the year and have to repeat the Student Selected Component(s) and who take different Student Selected Component(s) in their repeat year will be allowed only one attempt at the examination of this/these modules.

Fourth Year
1. Students will be expected to complete six clinical modules (25 CATS points each), one fourth year Integrated OSCE (MED4021, zero CATS points), one fourth year Written Examination (MED4022, zero CATS points) and a Personal and Professional Development Portfolio (MED4020, zero CATS points).
2. Students will take the fourth year Integrated OSCE and the fourth year Written Examination at the end of the spring semester.
3. The Personal and Professional Development Portfolio must be submitted during the spring semester by the published closing date. Students who have not reached a satisfactory standard in the Portfolio at first attempt will be permitted to resubmit the Portfolio by the published resubmission deadline
4. Supplementary examinations will be held in August/September.
5. Regulations governing progress:
5.1 Students may proceed to August resits except where they have failed a combination of the OSCE, the Written Examination and more than two clinical modules.
5.2 Students who are not permitted to resit in August will normally be required to repeat the year. Such students will be required to re-attend all the classes and assessment of any modules they have failed. Students will additionally have to attend, on a class only basis, all the classes associated with the OSCE and Written Examination.
5.3 Students who do not meet the attendance requirements of the clinical modules will, where possible within the constraints of the timetable, be provided with the opportunity to satisfactorily complete the module prior to the supplementary Examination Board. However, if this is not possible they may be required to repeat the year.
5.4 The Portfolio must be passed in order for the student to progress to the next stage of the course.

Final Year
1. During Final Year students will be required to pass the following compulsory elements:

One Student Selected Component which will consist of a clinical attachment (MED5003, 25 CATS points) which may be taken overseas
Attachments in Medicine (MED5016, 25 CATS points) and Surgery (MED5017, 25 CATS points): each attachment will be of six weeks’ duration
Specialty Clinical Attachments (MED5018, 25 CATS points) which will be of six weeks’ duration and will include a one week attachment in the Clinical Skills Education Centre
Final MB Part I written examinations (MED5015, zero CATS points)
Final MB Part II clinical examinations (MED5008, zero CATS points)
A nine week period of the Final Year Assistantship (MED5019, 40 CATS points) following Final MB Part II
A Personal and Professional Development Portfolio (MED5012, zero CATS points)

2. In addition to the above, students will be required to attend a Preparation for Practice course (MED5013, zero CATS points) and may undertake the national Prescribing Safety Assessment.
3. Progress Regulations
3.1 Candidates who fail one of the first four compulsory modules (Clinical Elective, Medicine Attachment, Surgery Attachment and Specialty Clinical Attachment) will, where possible within the constraints of the timetable, be provided with the opportunity to satisfactorily complete the module prior to the Final MB Pathway Board.
3.2 Students who fail more than one of the four compulsory modules (Clinical Elective, Medicine Attachment, Surgery Attachment, and Specialty Clinical Attachment) will not be permitted to resit and will be required to repeat the year.
3.3 Final MB Part I written examinations will be taken in February with resit examinations in May.
3.4 Final MB Part II clinical examinations will be taken in February with resit examinations in June.
3.5 Students must successfully complete the Final Year Assistantship prior to graduation. A period of remedial study is available for candidates who have not met the appropriate standard by the end of the nine week period. Candidates who fail to complete satisfactorily this module prior to graduation will normally be required to repeat Final Year. Candidates who fail to complete this module satisfactorily after a repeat year of study will normally be required to withdraw from the course.
3.6 Students must successfully complete a Personal and Professional Development Portfolio prior to graduation.

Students with protected characteristics

This programme includes practical and clinical elements where patient safety must be the primary consideration. Applications will be considered on an individual basis and in conjunction with professional guidelines, Occupational Health and Disability Services.

Are students subject to Fitness to Practise Regulations

(Please see General Regulations)

Yes
Fitness to Practise programmes are those which permit students to enter a profession which is itself subject to Fitness to Practise rules.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF PROGRAMME

1. Provide an educational environment within which students can develop enthusiasm for and interest in medicine, and realise their full potential by fostering the development of intellectual, scientific, clinical and technical skills.
2. Prepare students for independent and lifelong learning by encouraging self-directed study.
3. Foster learning through the study of original research evidence.
4. Provide a framework of opportunities for early patient contact in the primary and secondary healthcare sectors around which students can build a scientific picture of a holistic approach to medicine.
5. Through the inter-professional education programme provide students with opportunities to recognize the contribution of other health care professionals to the health care team.
6. Through the Student Selected Component programme provide students with an opportunity to study subjects in depth and enhance their understanding of the scientific principles underpinning the practice of medicine.
7. Through the intercalated degree programme, facilitate the development of a refined critical ability and increased confidence in scientific presentation, and further encourage a self-directed approach to increasing knowledge of the current scientific principles underlying health, disease and treatment.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Learning Outcomes: Cognitive Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Demonstrate the ability to solve basic clinical problems

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures
Case based tutorials
Case presentations
E-learning resources
Teaching videos
Simulation
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care
Self directed learning

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs)
Case presentations
Written exams including MCQs, case-based scenarios

Recognise the signs and symptoms of commonly presenting illnesses and diseases

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures
Case based tutorials
Case presentations
E-learning resources
Teaching videos
Simulation
Clinical attachments
Self directed learning

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCEs
Case presentations
Written Exams including MCQs, case-based scenarios
Essays

Learning Outcomes: Knowledge & Understanding

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Scientific concepts underpinning normal structure and function of the body systems

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Seminars
Lectures
Case based tutorials
E-learning resources
Case presentations
Self-directed learning

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, spot test, short essay)
Essays
Case reports
Oral presentations
Log books
Portfolios

Importance of molecular, biochemical and cellular mechanisms in the maintenance of homeostasis

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self Directed Learning

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Aetiology and mechanisms of disease

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self Directed Learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Causes of disease and the associated risk factors and disease prevention

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self Directed Learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Development of disease related changes to structure and function

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self Directed Learning
Clinical attachments located in hospitals, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Pharmacological principles of drug therapy, their efficacy in the treatment and relief of symptoms and associated adverse reactions

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self Directed Learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Principles of non-pharmacological treatments and their function in the management of illness and disability

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self Directed Learning

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Procedures for disease surveillance and screening, control of communicable diseases, organisation and structure of the NHS

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self Directed Learning

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Principles of healthcare planning, service prioritization, and health economics

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self Directed Learning

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Principles of demography and biological variability

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self Directed Learning

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Ethical and legal principles underpinning the practice of medicine

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self Directed Learning

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Disease prevention, assessment of health needs and health promotion

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self Directed Learning

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Development of age related change to structure and function

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self Directed Learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Principles of treatment and rehabilitation of patients with impairment, disability or handicap

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self Directed Learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Social and psychological factors that impact on relationships between the individual and family/partners, and others in society

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self Directed Learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Psychological consequences of illness for the patient, family and society.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self Directed Learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Awareness of understanding the healthcare needs of a diverse multicultural population.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self Directed Learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Apply to medical practice biomedical scientific principles, method and knowledge relating to: anatomy, biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, immunology, microbiology, molecular biology, nutrition, pathology, pharmacology and physiology.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Demonstrations
E-learning resources
Teaching videos
Simulation
Self directed learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCE s
Case presentations
Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Learning Outcomes: Transferable Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Undertake problem solving and critical analysis of information

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Self Directed Learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Oral presentations
Written exams
Formative and summative OSCEs

Use information technology in particular the recording of information and data retrieval

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Seminars
Demonstrations

Methods of Assessment

Projects
Dissertations
Portfolios

Demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills including the presentation of reflective and scientific information

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self Directed Learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Oral presentations
Group and individual projects
Essays
Dissertations
Poster presentations
Debates
Microteaching
Portfolios
Formative and summative OSCEs

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Diagnostic procedures
The student should be able to demonstrate competence in:
1. Measuring body temperature
2. Measuring pulse rate and blood pressure
3. Transcutaneous monitoring of oxygen saturation
4. Venepuncture
5. Managing blood samples correctly
6. Taking blood cultures
7. Measuring blood glucose
8. Managing an electrocardiograph (ECG) monitor
9. Performing and interpreting a 12-lead electrocardiograph (ECG)
10. Basic respiratory function tests
11. Urinalysis using Multistix
12. Advising patients on how to collect a mid-stream urine specimen
13. Taking nose, throat and skin swabs
14. Nutritional assessment
15. Pregnancy testing
16. Administering oxygen
17. Establishing peripheral intravenous access and setting up an infusion; use of infusion devices
18. Making up drugs for parenteral administration
19. Dosage and administration of insulin and use of sliding scales
20. Subcutaneous and intramuscular injections
21. Blood transfusion
22. Male and female urinary catheterisation
23. Instructing patients in the use of devices for inhaled medication
24. Use of local anaesthetics
25. Skin suturing
26. Wound care and basic wound dressing
27. Correct techniques for ‘moving and handling’ including patients
28. Giving information about the procedure, obtaining and recording consent, and ensuring appropriate aftercare
29. Hand washing (including surgical‘ scrubbing up’)
30. Use of personal protective equipment (gloves, gowns, masks)
31. Infection control in relation to procedures
32. Safe disposal of clinical waste, needles and other ‘sharps’

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self-directed learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCEs and TOSCE

Protect patients and improve care.

(a) Place patients’ needs and safety at the centre of the care process.
(b) Deal effectively with uncertainty and change.
(c) Understand the framework in which medicine is practised in the UK, including: the organisation, management and regulation of healthcare provision; the structures, functions and priorities of the NHS; and the roles of, and relationships between, the agencies and services involved in protecting and promoting individual and population health.
(d) Promote, monitor and maintain health and safety in the clinical setting, understanding how errors can happen in practice, applying the principles of quality assurance, clinical governance and risk management to medical practice, and understanding responsibilities within the current systems for raising concerns about safety and quality.
(e) Understand and have experience of the principles and methods of improvement, including audit, adverse incident reporting and quality improvement, and how to use the results of audit to improve practice.
(f) Respond constructively to the outcomes of appraisals, performance reviews and assessments.
(g) Demonstrate awareness of the role of doctors as managers, including seeking ways to continually improve the use and prioritisation of resources.
(h) Understand the importance of, and the need to keep to, measures to prevent the spread of infection, and apply the principles of infection prevention and control.
(i) Recognise own personal health needs, consult and follow the advice of a suitably qualified professional, and protect patients from any risk posed by own health.
(j) Recognise the duty to take action if a colleague’s health, performance or conduct is putting patients at risk.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self-directed learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations (short answer questions, short essay)
Essays
Oral presentations
Audit Project

Learn and work effectively within a multi-professional team.

(a) Understand and respect the roles and expertise of health and social care professionals in the context of working and learning as a multi-professional team.
(b) Understand the contribution that effective interdisciplinary teamworking makes to the delivery of safe and high-quality care.
(c) Work with colleagues in ways that best serve the interests of patients, passing on information and handing over care, demonstrating flexibility, adaptability and a problem-solving approach.
(d) Demonstrate ability to build team capacity and positive working relationships and undertake various team roles including leadership and the ability to accept leadership by others.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures
Tutorials
Seminars
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Formative TOSCE
group presentations and group projects

Reflect, learn and teach others.

(a) Acquire, assess, apply and integrate new knowledge, learn to adapt to changing circumstances and ensure that patients receive the highest level of professional care.
(b) Establish the foundations for lifelong learning and continuing professional development, including a professional development portfolio containing reflections, achievements and learning needs.
(c) Continually and systematically reflect on practice and, whenever necessary, translate that reflection into action, using improvement techniques and audit appropriately − for example, by critically appraising the prescribing of others.
(d) Manage time and prioritise tasks, and work autonomously when necessary and appropriate.
(e) Recognise own personal and professional limits and seek help from colleagues and supervisors when necessary.
(f) Function effectively as a mentor and teacher including contributing to the appraisal, assessment and review of colleagues, giving effective feedback, and taking advantage of opportunities to develop these skills.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures
Case based tutorials
Case presentations
E-learning resources
Teaching videos
Simulation
Clinical attachments
Self directed learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative written assessments, essays, short answer questions, Formative TOSCE
Micro-teaching
Group presentations

The graduate will be able to behave according to ethical and legal principles. The graduate will be able to:

(a) Know about and keep to the GMC’s ethical guidance and standards including Good Medical Practice, the ‘Duties of a doctor registered with the GMC’ and supplementary ethical guidance which describe what is expected of all doctors registered with the GMC.
(b) Demonstrate awareness of the clinical responsibilities and role of the doctor, making the care of the patient the first concern. Recognise the principles of patient-centred care, including self-care, and deal with patients’ healthcare needs in consultation with them and, where appropriate, their relatives or carers.
(c) Be polite, considerate, trustworthy and honest, act with integrity, maintain confidentiality, respect patients’ dignity and privacy, and understand the importance of appropriate consent.
(d) Respect all patients, colleagues and others regardless of their age, colour, culture, disability, ethnic or national origin, gender, lifestyle, marital or parental status, race, religion or beliefs, sex, sexual orientation, or social or economic status. Graduates will respect patients’ right to hold religious or other beliefs, and take these into account when relevant to treatment options.
(e) Recognise the rights and the equal value of all people and how opportunities for some people may be restricted by others’ perceptions.
(f) Understand and accept the legal, moral and ethical responsibilities involved in protecting and promoting the health of individual patients, their dependants and the public – including vulnerable groups such as children, older people, people with learning disabilities and people with mental illnesses.
(g) Demonstrate knowledge of laws, and systems of professional regulation through the GMC and others, relevant to medical practice, including the ability to complete relevant certificates and legal documents and liaise with the coroner or procurator fiscal where appropriate.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self-directed learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCEs and TOSCE
Case presentations
Written exams (short answer questions, multiple choice, case based scenarios, modified essay, short essay)
Essays
Case reports
Oral presentations

Use information effectively in a medical context.

(a) Keep accurate, legible and complete clinical records.
(b) Make effective use of computers and other information systems, including storing and retrieving information.
(c) Keep to the requirements of confidentiality and data protection legislation and codes of practice in all dealings with information.
(d) Access information sources and use the information in relation to patient care, health promotion, giving advice and information to patients, and research and education.
(e) Apply the principles, method and knowledge of health informatics to medical practice.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures
Seminars
Demonstrations
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Log Books

Carry out practical procedures safely and effectively.

(a) Be able to perform a range of diagnostic procedures, as listed under diagnostic procedures below and measure and record the findings.
(b) Be able to perform a range of therapeutic procedures, as listed under diagnostic procedures below.
(c) Be able to demonstrate correct practice in general aspects of practical procedures, as listed under diagnostic procedures below

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lecture
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self-directed learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCEs and TOSCE

Prescribe drugs safely, effectively and economically.

(a) Establish an accurate drug history, covering both prescribed and other medication.
(b) Plan appropriate drug therapy for common indications, including pain and distress.
(c) Provide a safe and legal prescription.
(d) Calculate appropriate drug doses and record the outcome accurately.
(e) Provide patients with appropriate information about their medicines.
(f) Access reliable information about medicines.
(g) Detect and report adverse drug reactions.
(h) Demonstrate awareness that many patients use complementary and alternative therapies, and awareness of the existence and range of these therapies, why patients use them, and how this might affect other types of treatment that patients are receiving.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self-directed learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCE and TOSCE Log Book
Written exams (including short answer questions, multiple choice questions, case based scenarios, modified essays, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Provide immediate care in medical emergencies.

(a) Assess and recognise the severity of a clinical presentation and a need for immediate emergency care.
(b) Diagnose and manage acute medical emergencies.
(c) Provide basic first aid.
(d) Provide immediate life support.
(e) Provide cardio-pulmonary resuscitation or direct other

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self-directed learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCEs and TOSCE

Communicate effectively with patients and colleagues in a medical context.

(a) Communicate clearly, sensitively and effectively with patients, their relatives or other carers, and colleagues from the medical and other professions, by listening, sharing and responding.
(b) Communicate clearly, sensitively and effectively with individuals and groups regardless of their age, social, cultural or ethnic backgrounds or their disabilities, including when English is not the patient’s first language.
(c) Communicate by spoken, written and electronic methods (including medical records), and be aware of other methods of communication used by patients. The graduate should appreciate the significance of non-verbal communication in the medical consultation.
(d) Communicate appropriately in difficult circumstances, such as when breaking bad news, and when discussing sensitive issues, such as alcohol consumption, smoking or obesity.
(e) Communicate appropriately with difficult or violent patients.
(f) Communicate appropriately with people with mental illness.
(g) Communicate appropriately with vulnerable patients.
(h) Communicate effectively in various roles, for example, as patient advocate, teacher, manager or improvement leader.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self-directed learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Formative and including OSCEs and TOSCE

Diagnose and manage clinical presentations.

(a) Interpret findings from the history, physical examination and mental-state examination, appreciating the importance of clinical, psychological, spiritual, religious, social and cultural factors.
(b) Make an initial assessment of a patient's problems and a differential diagnosis. Understand the processes by which doctors make and test a differential diagnosis.
(c) Formulate a plan of investigation in partnership with the patient, obtaining informed consent as an essential part of this process.
(d) Interpret the results of investigations, including growth charts, x-rays and the results of the diagnostic procedures listed under diagnostic procedures below.
(e) Synthesise a full assessment of the patient's problems and define the likely diagnosis or diagnoses.
(f) Make clinical judgements and decisions, based on the available evidence, in conjunction with colleagues and as appropriate for the graduate’s level of training and experience. This may include situations of uncertainty.
(g) Formulate a plan for treatment, management and discharge, according to established principles and best evidence, in partnership with the patient, their carers, and other health professionals as appropriate. Respond to patients’ concerns and preferences, obtain informed consent, and respect the rights of patients to reach decisions with their doctor about their treatment and care and to refuse or limit treatment.
(h) Support patients in caring for themselves.
(i) Identify the signs that suggest children or other vulnerable people may be suffering from abuse or neglect and know what action to take to safeguard their welfare.
(j) Contribute to the care of patients and their families at the end of life, including management of symptoms, practical issues of law and certification, and effective communication and teamworking.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self-directed learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCEs and TOSCE

The graduate will be able to carry out a consultation with a patient:

(a) Take and record a patient's medical history, including family and social history, talking to relatives or other carers where appropriate.
(b) Elicit patients’ questions, their understanding of their condition and treatment options, and their views, concerns, values and preferences.
(c) Perform a full physical examination.
(d) Perform a mental-state examination.
(e) Assess a patient’s capacity to make a particular decision in accordance with legal requirements and the GMC’s guidance.
(f) Determine the extent to which patients want to be involved in decision-making about their care and treatment.
(g) Provide explanation, advice, reassurance and support.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures
Seminars
Demonstrations
Self-directed learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCEs and TOSCE (Team Objective Structured Clinical Examination)

Apply scientific method and approaches to medical research.

(a) Critically appraise the results of relevant diagnostic, prognostic and treatment trials and other qualitative and quantitative studies as reported in the medical and scientific literature.
(b) Formulate simple relevant research questions in biomedical science, psychosocial science or population science, and design appropriate studies or experiments to address the questions.
(c) Apply findings from the literature to answer questions raised by specific clinical problems.
(d) Understand the ethical and governance issues involved in medical research.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Self-directed learning

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCE s
Case presentations
Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Apply to medical practice the principles, method and knowledge of population health and the improvement of health and healthcare.

(a) Discuss basic principles of health improvement, including the wider determinants of health, health inequalities, health risks and disease surveillance.
(b) Assess how health behaviours and outcomes are affected by the diversity of the patient population.
(c) Describe measurement methods relevant to the improvement of clinical effectiveness and care.
(d) Discuss the principles underlying the development of health and health service policy, including issues relating to health economics and equity, and clinical guidelines.
(e) Explain and apply the basic principles of communicable disease control in hospital and community settings.
(f) Evaluate and apply epidemiological data in managing healthcare for the individual and the community.
(g) Recognise the role of environmental and occupational hazards in ill-health and discuss ways to mitigate their effects.
(h) Discuss the role of nutrition in health.
(i) Discuss the principles and application of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of disease.
(j) Discuss from a global perspective the determinants of health and disease and variations in healthcare delivery and medical practice.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Self-directed learning

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCE s
Case presentations
Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Apply social science principles, method and knowledge to medical practice.

(a) Explain normal human behaviour at a societal level.
(b) Discuss sociological concepts of health, illness and disease.
(c) Apply theoretical frameworks of sociology to explain the varied responses of individuals, groups and societies to disease.
(d) Explain sociological factors that contribute to illness, the course of the disease and the success of treatment including issues relating to health inequalities, the links between occupation and health and the effects of poverty and affluence.
(e) Discuss sociological aspects of behavioural change and treatment compliance.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Self-directed learning

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCE s
Case presentations
Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Apply psychological principles, method and knowledge to medical practice.

(a) Explain normal human behaviour at an individual level.
(b) Discuss psychological concepts of health, illness and disease.
(c) Apply theoretical frameworks of psychology to explain the varied responses of individuals, groups and societies to disease.
(d) Explain psychological factors that contribute to illness, the course of the disease and the success of treatment.
(e) Discuss psychological aspects of behavioural change and treatment compliance.
(f) Discuss adaptation to major life changes, such as bereavement; comparing and contrasting the abnormal adjustments that might occur in these situations.
(g) Identify appropriate strategies for managing patients with dependence issues and other demonstrations of self-harm.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Self-directed learning

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCE s
Case presentations
Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Make accurate observations of clinical phenomena and appropriate critical analysis of clinical data.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Self-directed learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCE s
Case presentations
Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Demonstrate knowledge of drug actions: therapeutics and pharmacokinetics; drug side effects and interactions, including for multiple treatments, long-term conditions and non-prescribed medication; and also including effects on the population, such as the spread of antibiotic resistance.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Self-directed learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCE s
Case presentations
Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Select appropriate forms of management for common diseases, and ways of preventing common diseases, and explain their modes of action and their risks from first principles.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Self-directed learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCE s
Case presentations
Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Explain the fundamental principles underlying such investigative techniques.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Self-directed learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCE s
Case presentations
Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Justify the selection of appropriate investigations for common clinical cases.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Self-directed learning
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCE s
Case presentations
Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Explain the scientific bases for common disease presentations.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
On-line learning resources
Self-directed learning

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCE s
Case presentations
Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Explain normal human structure and functions.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Self-directed learning

Methods of Assessment

Formative and summative OSCE s
Case presentations
Written examinations (short answer questions, multiple choice questions, modified essay, case-based scenarios, short essay)
Essay
Case reports
Oral presentations

Learning Outcomes: Transferable Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Apply scientific research principles and audit

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Self Directed Learning

Methods of Assessment

Oral presentations
Group and individual projects

Develop own knowledge and skills in clinical medicine, and contribute to the development of others, through active participation in teamwork and group learning opportunities.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Simulated clinical training
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Summative and formative assessments including group projects and presentations, TOSCE

Manage time effectively and prioritize tasks

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Seminars

Methods of Assessment

Oral presentations
Group and individual projects
Essays
Dissertations
Poster presentations
Debates
Microteaching
Portfolios
Summative and formative OSCEs

Work effectively as a team member

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Tutorials
Seminars
Demonstrations
Simulated clinical training
Clinical attachments located in hospital wards, out-patient clinics, day procedure units and primary care

Methods of Assessment

Summative and formative assessments including group projects and presentations. Formative Team Objective Structured Examination (TOSCE)

MODULE INFORMATION

Programme Requirements

Module Title

Module Code

Level/ stage

Credits

Availability

Duration

Pre-requisite

 

Assessment

 

 

 

 

S1

S2

 

 

Core

Option

Coursework %

Practical %

Examination %

Clinical Elective

MED5003

5

25

YES

6 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Final MB Part II

MED5008

5

0

YES

1 weeks

N

YES

0%

100%

0%

The Year 1 & 2 Integrated Case Based Assessment

MED2011

2

0

1 weeks

N

YES

0%

0%

100%

Personal and Professional Development Portfolio

MED1012

1

0

24 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Personal and Professional Development Portfolio

MED5012

5

0

25 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Preparation for Practice

MED5013

5

0

YES

2 weeks

N

YES

0%

0%

100%

Student Selected Component

MED3012

3

10

YES

3 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Student Selected Component

MED3013

3

10

YES

3 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Scientific Basis of Clinical Practice

MED3014

3

20

28 weeks

N

YES

0%

0%

100%

Clinical Practice

MED3015

3

80

28 weeks

N

YES

0%

65%

35%

Student Selected Component

MED2016

2

10

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Student Selected Component

MED1021

1

10

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Student Selected Component

MED2017

2

10

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Personal and Professional Development Portfolio

MED2018

2

0

24 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Anatomical Basis of Clinical Practice 2

MED2012

2

20

24 weeks

N

YES

40%

0%

60%

Physiological Basis of Clinical Practice 2

MED2013

2

20

24 weeks

N

YES

30%

0%

70%

Principles of Disease and Treatment 2

MED2014

2

20

24 weeks

N

YES

20%

0%

80%

Peoples and Populations 2

MED2015

2

20

24 weeks

N

YES

20%

0%

80%

Perioperative and Emergency Medicine

MED4016

4

25

6 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Psychiatry

MED4013

4

25

6 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Ageing and Health, Fractures and Radiology

MED4012

4

25

6 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

General Practice and Cancer Studies

MED4014

4

25

6 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Healthcare of Children

MED4015

4

25

6 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Obstetrics and Gynaecology

MED4017

4

25

6 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Personal and Professional Development Portfolio

MED3016

3

0

34 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Personal and Professional Development Portfolio

MED4020

4

0

36 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Clinical and Professional Skills 2

MED2021

2

20

24 weeks

N

YES

0%

100%

0%

Final MB Part I: Written

MED5015

5

0

YES

1 weeks

N

YES

0%

0%

100%

Final Year Assistantship

MED5019

5

40

YES

9 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Fourth Year Integrated OSCE

MED4021

4

0

YES

1 weeks

N

YES

0%

100%

0%

Medicine Attachment

MED5016

5

25

YES

6 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Surgery Attachment

MED5017

5

25

YES

6 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Specialty Clinical Attachments

MED5018

5

25

YES

6 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Fourth Year Written Assessment

MED4022

4

0

YES

1 weeks

N

YES

0%

0%

100%

Principles of Disease and Treatment 1

MED1023

1

20

24 weeks

N

YES

40%

0%

60%

Anatomical Basis of Clinical Practice 1

MED1024

1

30

24 weeks

N

YES

50%

0%

50%

Peoples and Populations 1

MED1025

1

20

24 weeks

N

YES

30%

0%

70%

Clinical and Professional Skills 1

MED1026

1

20

24 weeks

N

YES

0%

100%

0%

Physiological Basis of Clinical Practice 1

MED1027

1

20

24 weeks

N

YES

30%

0%

70%

Notes

Year 1: All pre-requisites for entry to first year medicine

Year 2 Pre-requisites - Successful completion of all first year medicine modules

Year 3 Pre-requisites - Successful completion of all second year medicine modules

Year 4 Pre-requisites - Successful completion of all third year medicine modules

Year 5 Pre-requisites for all modules except the Clinical Elective and Final MB Part II - Successful completion of the first four years of the undergraduate medical course. In order to take the Year 5 Clinical Elective, students must have completed the first four years of the course. In order to take the Final MB Part II, students must have successfully completed all elements of the medical curriculum apart from Final MB Part I, the Final Year Assistantship and the Year 5 Portfolio.