Lecture Capture

Lecture Capture: The possibilities are endless

No two lectures are the same, no two courses are the same. There is no 'one size fits all' approach to teaching and different subjects will have different important elements to them. They do have one thing in common though, the students are there to learn. Recordings will help the students not only come exam time but also to review classes and tutorials within a few days, assisting in note making and assignments. Most rooms will not be equipped with cameras, however special requests can be accommodated.

Capturing lectures can pave the way for more dynamic interactive classes. Students can review and make notes later allowing for more interaction during lessons.

Recording lectures will help the students not only come exam time but also to review classes and tutorials within a few days, assisting in note making and assignments. The image from the data projector is on the left and a camera shot from the room is on the right. Most rooms will not be equipped with cameras, however special requests can be accommodated. The audio from the rooms PA system will also be recorded. Below is an example screenshot from a lecture recorded in a theatre in the David Kier Building.  

By providing recordings to your students after a lecture, you are affording them the chance to sit up and engage with your class, rather than sitting with their head down trying to write notes. Equally, you are affording them the chance to participate and be involved in the class, making it much more dynamic and engaging. 

 Why bother?

There are a number of good reasons why capturing lectures is a good idea. Aside from the ones widely publicised, there is another significant advantage that takes the form of analytics.

Every Mediasite video has its own set of data attached to it that you can access from My mediasite. This will show you who has watched the content, how much they watched, when they watched etc, just the usual things you would expect. The part that is most useful is the heat map, this is a graphical representation of your recording showing the areas most viewed. As you can see in the diagram below, the green and red sections are the parts with the most views, this allows you as a tutor to ask the class specifically about these areas, perhaps it is something they need extra help with or further explanation.