SLOPE FAILURE TYPES:

Creep

creeping

SLOPE FAILURE NAME:

Creep

DEFINITION:

Slow generalised flow of cohesive material on a debris/soil covered slope.

MAIN CHARACTERISTICS:

Slopes where superficial creep occurs are characterised by clays and silts, and often a high moisture content that makes surface material deform downslope en masse as a viscous flowing body. Flow shapes and small scars can be distinguished all over creep slopes.

Creep is a slow, almost continuous movement, which even allows vegetation to cover creeping areas.

CAUSES:

Creep is normally associated with environmental cycles (wetting / drying, heating / cooling) that drive expansion and contraction of surface layers. Where moisture levels are high there may be quasi–continuous plastic deformation and downslope movement.

AREAS PRONE TO FAILURE:

As explained before, creeping needs a considerable amount of clays or silts to be active. Till mantled areas, and debris mantled cliffs are therefore the most likely places to the formation of creeping. Western part of Port Ganny, Portnaboe and Port Noffer are the most creeping prone areas in Giant’s Causeway.

OCCURRENCE:

When active, there is an almost continuous movement.

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