SLOPE FAILURE TYPES:

Slump/undercutting collapse

slump

SLOPE FAILURE NAME:

Slump/undercutting collapse

DEFINITION:

Small rotational or translational slide that occurs due to the destabilization caused by a path or road on the slope profile.

MAIN CHARACTERISTICS:

Following the McDonnell (2000) study on landslide management that focused on the Giant’s Causeway, it is possible to distinguish a category of small landslides that happen along the margins of paths and roads.

These are very small translational slides, with a size always below 10m³ (most of them are around 1 m³). They leave a horseshoe shaped scar, and released material never moves beyond 2 metres away from such scar. The debris often partially invades the path or road.

CAUSES:

The main cause is destabilization of the slope profile by human infrastructures (paths and roads). High rainfall events help to trigger these failures.

AREAS PRONE TO FAILURE:

Paths and roads that cover the middle part of a slope. Especially the Shepherd’s Path, the lower path between Shepherd’s Path and the Amphitheatre (the eastern part of Port Noffer) and the Causeway Road at Portnaboe (near the Onion Skins Rocks), are potential areas for these failures.

OCCURRENCE:

After or during continuous rainfall events.

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