Mapping Frontiers

Mapping Frontiers, Crossing Borders: Routes to north/south co-operation in a divided island

CIBR was a major participant in a consortium involving researchers at University College Dublin, Queen’s University Belfast, Centre for Cross-Border Studies, Armagh and Democratic Dialogue. The project is aimed at examining the intended and unintended consequences of the Irish border since its inception in 1920 with a view to identifying pathways for promoting cross-border contact, co-operation and mutual understanding on the island. Overall funding for the project is c.€600,000 over a two-year period. The EU Peace and Reconciliation Programme (Peace 2) has funded the project via the Higher Education Authority in Dublin.

The project consists of three parts, each one involving researchers from both Universities:

  • A comparative study of the creation of the Irish border in the context of partition as a mechanism for resolving ethnic and national conflict.
  • The evolution and consolidation of the Irish border as a social divide, focusing on political and administrative institutions, the impact of violent conflict and cross-border interaction in economic and cultural fields.
  • The new opportunities for cross-border contact and co-operation in the context of EU membership, British-Irish inter-governmental co-operation and, most recently, the arrangements associated with the Good Friday Agreement. Cross-border projects since the late 1980s will be mapped, a series of in-depth case studies will probe different forms of co-operation and comparisons will be made with cross-border co-operation in other parts of the EU.

CIBR was a major participant in a consortium involving researchers at University College Dublin, Queen’s University Belfast, Centre for Cross-Border Studies, Armagh and Democratic Dialogue. The project is aimed at examining the intended and unintended consequences of the Irish border since its inception in 1920 with a view to identifying pathways for promoting cross-border contact, co-operation and mutual understanding on the island. Overall funding for the project is c.€600,000 over a two-year period. The EU Peace and Reconciliation Programme (Peace 2) has funded the project via the Higher Education Authority in Dublin.

The project consists of three parts, each one involving researchers from both Universities:

A comparative study of the creation of the Irish border in the context of partition as a mechanism for resolving ethnic and national conflict.The evolution and consolidation of the Irish border as a social divide, focusing on political and administrative institutions, the impact of violent conflict and cross-border interaction in economic and cultural fields.The new opportunities for cross-border contact and co-operation in the context of EU membership, British-Irish inter-governmental co-operation and, most recently, the arrangements associated with the Good Friday Agreement. Cross-border projects since the late 1980s will be mapped, a series of in-depth case studies will probe different forms of co-operation and comparisons will be made with cross-border co-operation in other parts of the EU.