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Dr M.W. Robinson

Dr. Mark Robinson
Dr. Mark Robinson
Lecturer in Parasite Proteomics

BSc (Hons) First Class, Zoology, 1999;
PhD Molecular Parasitology, 2003,
Queen's University, Belfast

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Contact information
Tel:  +44 (0)28 9097 2120 (Direct line)
Fax:  +44 (0)28 9097 5877
Email:  mark.robinson@qub.ac.uk
Room:  Medical Biology Centre - 0G.440.

Teaching

I teach a variety of subject areas at undergraduate level including bioinformatics, proteomics, parasitology and immunology.

Modules:

  • Level 1 Genetics & Molecular Biology (GEN1005)
  • Level 2 Biochemical Methods (BBC2015)
  • Level 3 Farm Animal Health & Welfare (ALU3031)
  • Level 3 The Immune System (BBC3013)

Administrative Responsibilities

  • Joint module coordinator for Level 1 Genetics & Molecular Biology (GEN1005)
  • Undergraduate Staff-Student Consultative Committee
  • Member of the University Biological Agents Advisory Committee

Research Profile

Mark received a BSc (Hons) in Zoology (1999) and a PhD in Molecular Parasitology (2003) from Queen's University, Belfast.  During 2003-2004 he worked on the chemical analysis of shellfish toxins as a postdoctoral researcher within the Department of Veterinary Sciences at Queens.  Following this, Mark worked on nematode proteomics and molecular biology at the University of Aberdeen until 2007 when he was awarded a prestigious Wain International Fellowship from the British Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) to continue his proteomics research at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS).  The following year Mark won a UTS Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellowship which he held as an independent researcher at the Infection, Immunity and Innovation (ithree) Institute until 2012.

Throughout his career Mark has been committed to the study of infectious diseases with the view of developing new methods of treatment. Of particular interest are molecules secreted by pathogenic organisms as these function at the host-pathogen interface and have critical roles during infection and pathogenesis.  Mark uses a range of molecular biology and proteomics tools to identify and characterise proteins secreted by medically-important helminth parasites, and other pathogens, as well as investigating their effects on host cell function.

His main research interests include:

  • Proteomics of host-pathogen interactions
  • Biochemistry of pathogen proteases
  • Structure-function relationships of parasite immunomodulatory peptides

Other information

  • Editorial boards of the International Journal for Parasitology and Frontiers in Immunology
  • Fellow of the UK Higher Education Academy
  • Book editor: Robinson, M.W. & Dalton, J.P. (2011) Cysteine Proteases of Pathogenic Organisms, Landes Bioscience Publishers, Austin, USA.