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Chief nourisher in life’s feast – Sleep, Workshop in collaboration with University of Ulster, School of Psychology

Chief nourisher in life’s feast – Sleep, Workshop in collaboration with University of Ulster, School of Psychology

23 Jul 2014 2:00PM - 23 Jul 2014 4:00PM

Description:

Speaker: Professor Neville M Blampied, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. For human beings, from birth to death, regular and refreshing sleep is vital to health and happiness. Nevertheless, significant numbers of infants, children, adolescents and adults experience sleep difficulties and disruptions. Chronic settling difficulties and nightwaking is common in infancy, sleep disruptions can occur in childhood and especially adolescence, and insomnia is a major issue for adults. Beginning with the work of Bootzin and his Stimulus Control Theory of Adult Insomnia, a behavioural perspective has contributed in important but under-appreciated ways to understanding and treating sleep disturbances across the lifespan. This talk will try to answer questions such as What is sleep? Why do we sleep? What can go wrong with sleep at different ages? and, How can we solve and prevent sleep problems? – all from a behavioural science viewpoint. Recent unpublished results from our lab on treating sleep problems in typically developing children and children with ASD will be presented. Brief Biography for Professor Neville M Blampied ‌Neville was born in Auckland, NZ and is a third generation New Zealander of Irish and Jersey Is ancestry and the son of a dairy farmer. He graduated MSc in Psychology from the ‌University of Auckland in 1970, having been introduced to behaviour analysis by Ivan Beale and John Irwin. He started as a Lecturer in the Department of Psychology University of Canterbury, Christchurch, in 1970, planning to stay three years! Over time at Canterbury he morphed from a physiological psychologist to a behavioural pharmacologist to an experimental behaviour analyst and then (finally) to an applied behaviour analyst. His major research area for the past 20 years has been in applied family psychology, notably pediatric sleep disturbances. Recently, he also got involved in research into the psychological effects of the Canterbury earthquakes, for which, under his leadership, the Department of Psychology was awarded the inaugural College of Science Research Team award in December, 2012. In 2012 he completed a 7-year stint as Head of Department and member of the Executive of the College of Science and the University’s Academic Board. He has also served six years as Director of Scientific Affairs for the New Zealand Psychological Society (2004-2010), two years as National President of the Association of University Staff (now the TEU; 2000-2001), three years on the Board of the NZ Universities Academic Audit Unit (2001-2003), and has just finished a term as President of Division 6, International Association of Applied Psychology.


Venue: QUB, Lanyon/Canada Room
Booking info: Please register by e-mailing Jan Speer, jan.speer@qub.ac.uk

Too Gay to Foster

Too Gay to Foster

18 Sep 2014 12:30PM - 18 Sep 2014 2:00PM

Description:

SPEAKER: Daniel Monk, Birbeck University Daniel Monk will present a paper on the experiences of a gay couple who were rejected as foster parents because they were in an open relationship. He will examine different understandings of child welfare and the limits to equality.


Venue: 18 College Green/0G/008
Booking info: REGISTRATION: This is a free and open event but for numbers please register with jan.speer@qub.ac.uk, sandwich lunch will be at 12.30pm

Employment for adults with disabilities: Policies and Practice

Employment for adults with disabilities: Policies and Practice

23 Oct 2014 1:00PM - 23 Oct 2014 4:30PM

Description:

Employment of adults with disabilities is a topic of great interest and importance today. Our discussion will focus on strategies, research and best practices that can assure that adults with disabilities have the skills and opportunity to compete in the local and global economy and in the 21st century workplace.  Too often, adults with disabilities face significant challenges in accessing and maintaining employment opportunities that maximize their skills, talents and abilities. For many, low expectations, under-employment and limited access to meaningful careers have been the reality. For others, adult onset of disability has meant the untimely shortening or termination of a career.Promising strategies that involve business, education and the disability community abound. There is a growing body of research and development of evidence-based practices in the field of employment of youth and adults with disabilities. Disability employment policy can and should be viewed in the context of the local and global economy.  As importantly, we can learn to tell a better story - from the perspective of the adult with a disability, from the perspective of employers and from the perspective of the community that benefits.

Short Biography:
Lynnae Ruttledge has committed her career to disability-related public policy and program development with a focus on employment of adults with disabilities. In her work in the fields of education, independent living, vocational rehabilitation and international exchange, Lynnae has provided effective leadership for collaborative partnerships with educators, researchers, advocates, business, community-based organizations and governmental agencies.  Lynnae currently serves as a Presidential appointee to the National Council on Disability, an independent federal agency that advises the President, Congress and other federal agencies on disability policy. In addition, she serves as a disability policy advisor to DOCTRID (Daughters of Charity, Technology  Research into Disability) and Michigan State University. In 2013, Lynnae also served as a Presidential appointee to the fifteen member US Senate Commission on Long Term Care.  Lynnae provided national leadership to the public vocational rehabilitation program as Commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration with the US  Department of Education from 2010 - 2012. Throughout her extensive public service career, Lynnae has held policy development and executive level leadership positions at the local, state and national levels.  Committed to international disability rights advocacy, Lynnae is a strong supporter of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. She has been affiliated with Mobility International USA, a US-based disability rights NGO, since 1988 and has served as a citizen diplomat in educational exchanges in South America, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Australia/New Zealand, Russia and Europe.  Lynnae and her husband (an Irish citizen) make their home in the state of Washington in the Pacific Northwest.


Venue: VENUE: Canada Room & Council Chamber, Lanyon Building, QUB.
Booking info: REGISTRATION: This is an open and free event, but for numbers for catering please register with Jan.speer@qub.ac.uk

Authority and the Teacher

Authority and the Teacher

29 Oct 2014 2:00PM - 29 Oct 2014 6:00PM

Description:

The notions of authority in education has become an increasingly negative concept, regarded by some as championed only by the rigid traditionalists and those who cling on to outdated educational theory and philosophy. 'Authority and the Teacher', seeks to overturn the notion that authority is a restrictive force within education, serving only to stifle creativity and drown out the vice of the student. William H. Kitchen argues that any education must have, as one of its cornerstones, a component which encourages the fullest development of knowledge, which serves as the great educational emancipator. In this version of knowledge-driven education, the teacher's authority should be absolute, so as to ensure that the teacher has the scope to liberate their pupils. The pupil, in the avoidance of ignorance, can thus embrace what is rightfully theirs; the inheritance of intellectual riches passed down through time. By invoking the work of three major philosophers - Polanyi, Oakeshott and Wittgenstein - as well as contributions from other key thinkers on authority, William Kitchen underpins previous claims for the need for authority in education with the philosophical clout necessary to ensure these arguments permeate modern mainstream educational thinking. Programme: Arrival and Registration (1:45pm): Introduction (2:00pm): TBC

Lecture 1 (2:15pm – 3:00pm): William H. Kitchen, “Authority and the Teacher”
Lecture 2 (3:00pm – 3:30pm): Mr Michael Johnston and Mrs Mairead Buick, “A practitioner’s perspective”
Break       (3:30pm – 4:00pm)
Lecture 3 (4:00pm – 4:30pm): Mr Robert McCartney QC, “The death of the progressive, constructivist curriculum in Northern Ireland”
Keynote Lecture (4:30pm – 5:15pm): Professor Frank Furedi, “Sociological and Historical Authority”
Conclusions and Summary (5:15pm – 5:30pm): William H. Kitchen
Discussion and Questions (5:30pm – 5:40pm)


Venue: Canada room and Council Chamber, Lanyon Building, QUB
Booking info: This is a free event please register with Jan Speer, jan.speer@qub.ac.uk