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Anthropology Seminar: Merav Amir - '‘When activism fails: an ethnography of the anti-occupation movement in Israel/Palestine.’

Anthropology Seminar: Merav Amir - '‘When activism fails: an ethnography of the anti-occupation movement in Israel/Palestine.’

2 Dec 2014 4:15PM - 2 Dec 2014 6:00PM

Description:

Anthropology and Ethnomusicology Research Seminar - Week 10 Dr Merav Amir (Queen's University Belfast) - '‘When activism fails: an ethnography of the anti-occupation movement in Israel/Palestine." The Israeli 'peace camp' suffered a major blow in October 2000, following the collapse of the Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations and the outburst of the Second Intifada. Some claim that it all but disappeared, yet, a more accurate description would portray this break as a shift from two modes of political engagement. While the earlier forms of involvement were more ideologically guided and were based on existing social movements, the new modes of activism are action-based initiatives, formed towards coalition-building and are more geared towards the achievement of particular aims. Based on ten years of field work with different grass-root initiatives, this talk will aim to shed light on the ways in which the identities of the activists play into anti-occupation activism, by focusing on the more interesting ways in which actions falls short of achieving their stated goals, rather than on successes and breakthroughs, and by examining some of the unintended consequences of these interactions.


Venue: Performance Room (G06, 13 University Square), School of History & Anthropology
Booking info:

Anthropology PG Seminar: 'Fieldwork ‘at home’? Processes and reflections on researching and belonging among Nigerians in Greece'. Evanthia Patsiaoura

5 Dec 2014 1:30PM - 5 Dec 2014 3:00PM

Description:

Talk by Evanthia Patsiaoura at the Anthropology Postgraduate Seminar


Venue: 20 College Green, Room 01/012
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History Staff-Postgrad Seminar: Steven Balbirnie, ‘Britain's colonial campaign in the Arctic: native auxiliaries in Northern Russia 1918-19’

History Staff-Postgrad Seminar: Steven Balbirnie, ‘Britain's colonial campaign in the Arctic: native auxiliaries in Northern Russia 1918-19’

5 Dec 2014 4:00PM - 5 Dec 2014 5:30PM

Description:

Steven Balbirnie (UCD), ‘Britain's colonial campaign in the Arctic: native auxiliaries in Northern Russia 1918-19’

All welcome


Venue: Postgrad Seminar Room, 18 College Green
Booking info:

NI Human Rights Festival Lecture: Nicholas Vincent, 'Magna Carta and its Legacy'

NI Human Rights Festival Lecture: Nicholas Vincent, 'Magna Carta and its Legacy'

8 Dec 2014 6:00PM - 10 Dec 2014 7:30PM

Description:

Public Lecture hosted by School of History and Anthropology, with the Northern Ireland Human Rights Consortium as part of the NI Human Rights Festival:

Prof. Nicholas Vincent (University of East Anglia): 'Magna Carta and its Legacy'

Prof. Vincent is author of Magna Carta: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford, 2012) and a lead researcher in the Magna Carta Project - see http://magnacarta.cmp.uea.ac.uk/


Venue: Lanyon South 01/052, QUB
Booking info: Free event

Wiles Symposium: Remembering 1916: the Easter Rising, the Somme and the politics of memory

Wiles Symposium: Remembering 1916: the Easter Rising, the Somme and the politics of memory

26 Mar 2015 7:00PM - 27 Mar 2015 5:00PM

Description:

1916 witnessed two events that would profoundly shape both politics and commemoration in Ireland over the course of the following century. Although the Easter Rising and the battle of the Somme were important historical events in their own right, their significance also lay in how they came to be understood as iconic moments in the emergence of Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic.

The Easter Rising proved a source of legitimacy not only for the independent Irish state that emerged out of the War of Independence but for subsequent republican movements that sought to justify the continued use of violence for political ends. From the 1960s the Rising’s contested legacy became central to the emergence of acrimonious debates about the writing of Irish history that were further intensified and, unusually for historiographical disputes, given wide public purchase by the outbreak of the Troubles.

In Ulster the sacrifice of the 36th Division on the Western Front provided a key foundation myth for the Northern Irish state. As with the memory of the Rising for republicans, the Somme offered unionist and loyalist movements a potent source of political capital. Although long a contentious feature of the Irish commemorative landscape, as witnessed by its ubiquity in loyalist murals, the aftermath of the Good Friday Agreement has also seen the appropriation of the memory of the First World War to fashion a more conciliatory narrative of the shared Catholic and Protestant experience of war.

Adopting an interdisciplinary approach drawing on history, politics, anthropology and cultural studies, this colloquium will explore how the memory of these two iconic events has been constructed, mythologised and revised over the course of the past century. The aim is not merely to understand how the Rising and Somme came to exert a central place in how the past is viewed in Ireland, but to address this subject as a means of exploring wider questions about the relationship between history and memory.

Topics of interest to those beyond scholars of Irish history will include: the construction of communal memory, the role of commemoration in shaping national and political identity, and the relationship between academic history and public memory. Specific papers will address: the politics of memory and commemoration; the memorialisation of history; the shaping of collective memory; the influence of the Troubles on the history and memory of 1916; the role of the historian in engaging with popular memory and commemoration; the international impact of 1916; and how theories of memory can inform our understanding of commemoration and popular history.

More info at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/SchoolofHistoryandAnthropology/News/Conferences/Remembering1916theEasterRisingtheSommeandthepoliticsofmemory/#d.en.473724


Venue: 26 March - Ulster Museum 27 March - Canada Room
Booking info:
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The 2015 Wiles Lectures

The 2015 Wiles Lectures

27 May 2015 5:00PM - 30 May 2015 12:00PM

Description:

The Wiles Lectures for 2015 will be delivered by Professor Lyndal Roper, Fellow of Oriel College and Regius Professor of History at the University of Oxford, on 27-30 May 2015. Professor Roper's Wiles lectures will be given over four days at Queen's University Belfast, on the theme: 'Luther and the Reformation: A Cultural History'.

More information at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/SchoolofHistoryandAnthropology/News/WilesLectureSeries/WilesLectures2015/


Venue: PFC
Booking info:
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