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Historical Background to the School of Pharmacy

 

The School of Pharmacy is situated on the Medical Biology Centre site, in close proximity to the two main Teaching Hospitals (Belfast City Hospital and the Royal Victoria Hospital) and to the pre-clinical and clinical departments of the School of Medicine.

In 1929, a BSc degree in Pharmaceutics was founded at The Queen's University of Belfast, making it one of the oldest pharmacy degree courses in the United Kingdom.

Teaching in Pharmacy was provided at this time by the Belfast College of Technology. The degree course ran in tandem with the diploma course, then the major entry route into the profession. In common with the rest of the UK, degree level entry into the profession became mandatory in the late 1960's.

In 1969, the BSc Pharmaceutics degree at Queen's was recognised as a qualifying degree for direct registration with the then Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain.

Following a reorganisation of higher education in Northern Ireland, the course moved in 1971 from the College of Technology to a new Department of Pharmacy in Queen's University. At this time, the first chair in pharmacy was founded.

In 1980, the department moved to a purpose designed building on the University's Medical Biology Centre campus, adjacent to the Belfast City Hospital. In 1988, following a reorganisation within the University, Pharmacy became one of seven schools within the Faculty of Science. The opening of the McClay Research Centre in 2002 doubled the available space in the School. In 2005 the School became one of four schools in the new Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences.

The School of Pharmacy at Queen’s is now consistently listed as one of the leading centres for Pharmacy education and research in the UK.

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