Skip to main content

Tanya O'Sullivan

<p>Tanya O

Tanya O'Sullivan

Qualifications

BA Hons Archaeology & Art History
MA Archaeology
Dip. Irish Heritage Management

Postgraduate (part-time)

Email: tosullivan03@qub.ac.uk

Address

School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology (GAP)
Queen’s University Belfast
Belfast, BT7 1NN
Northern Ireland, UK

Telephone

+44 (0)28 9097 3312

Current Research: Society, Space and Culture (SCC)

Keeping Origins in Site: Lives, Locations and Science in Dublin 1870-1910.

My research project arose from an interest in ‘origins’ interpretation prompted by questions arising from previous work in archaeology. By drawing on conceptual and analytical themes from both geography and biography, the thesis is now working to underscore the importance of ‘life spaces’ to critical debates in past scientific inquiry. Specifically, encounters with origins theories in the emerging fields of physics, biology, anthropometry and linguistics, are being scrutinized through the diverse social, religious and political lenses of the late nineteenth-century city.

Supervisors

Professor David Livingstone
Dr. Diarmid Finnegan

Presentations

‘Keeping Origins in Site’, paper presented to the Irish Geography Postgraduate Training Consortium, Glencree, Co. Wicklow, February 9th 2008.

‘Keeping Origins in Site: Geographies of Reception in Late Victorian Dublin’, paper presented to the Royal Geographical Society - Institute of British Geographers Annual Conference, Royal Geographical Society, London, August 27th 2008.

‘Scientific Culture, the Ether and Origins’, paper presented to the Society for the Study of Nineteenth-Century Ireland Summer Conference on ‘Science and Technology in Nineteenth-Century Ireland’, Royal Irish Academy, Dublin, July 2nd 2009.

‘Scientific Culture in Late Victorian Dublin: Some Spatial Perspectives’, short paper presented to GAP Research Day, Queen’s University, Belfast, January 29th 2010.

‘Keeping Origins in Order at the Dublin Anthropometric Laboratory, 1891-1900’, paper presented to the Royal Irish Academy’s Historical Sciences Committee Spring Meeting on ‘The History of Science, Technology and Medicine in Ireland’, National Museum of Ireland, Collins Barracks Dublin, April 19th 2011.

‘Biographical Space and the Reception of Scientific Knowledge in Late Victorian Dublin', paper presented to the Royal Irish Academy’s Historical Sciences Committee Spring Meeting on ‘The History of Science, Technology and Medicine in Ireland’, held in association with the School of GAP, Queen’s University Belfast, April 20th 2012.