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Dr Jonathan Wright

<p>Dr. Jonathan Wright</p>
<p>BA Hons (History and Politics) Durham 2002, <br /> MLitt Aberdeen 2005, <br /> PhD Belfast 2010</p>

Dr. Jonathan Wright

BA Hons (History and Politics) Durham 2002,
MLitt Aberdeen 2005,
PhD Belfast 2010



Email: jonathan.wright@qub.ac.uk

Address:

Room 02 032, Elmwood Building
School of Geography, Archaeology and Palaeoecology (GAP)
Queen’s University Belfast
Belfast, BT7 1NN Northern Ireland, UK

Current Research (Society, Space and Culture):

Jonathan Wright is a political and cultural historian whose research addresses the interconnected histories of nineteenth-century Ireland and Britain and British/Irish imperial history, with a particular emphasis on the Ulster experience of empire, Irish imperial networks in nineteenth century Ceylon and the collection and dissemination of imperial knowledge. Having studied at Durham University and the University of Aberdeen, he completed his PhD at Queen’s University, Belfast in 2010, before going on to hold an IRCHSS-funded postdoctoral fellowship at Trinity College, Dublin. His first book, The natural leaders and their world: politics, culture and society in Belfast c. 1801-32, will be published this autumn by Liverpool University Press. As a research fellow on the AHRC-funded Scientific Metropolis project, he is currently exploring a range of themes relating to science and scientific culture in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Belfast. These include, but are not limited to, the connections that existed between scientific activity and the development of civic pride and identity; the ways in which science was applied to address the problems generated by Belfast’s rapid expansion; and the networks (regional, national and imperial) by which scientific information, personnel and expertise travelled to and from Belfast. In addition, Jonathan is also working on a second book, provisionally entitled Career-building, unionism and empire in mid-Victorian Britain, which explores the life and career of Sir James Emerson Tennent, the Belfast-born writer and parliamentarian who served as colonial secretary of Ceylon from 1845 to 1850.