Partner Events

Transitional Justice and
The Politics of Inscription
Wednesday 18th October 2017

8-12 Bishop Sr. Within,
Derry~Londonderry
from 11.00am


In his new book, Jospeh Robinson argues that we must work towards a new politics of public memory in Northern Ireland, one that resists the control of powerful memory brokers and facilitates a vibrant, democratic debate over the ways in whcih a traumatic past can or should be remembered.

Joseph Robinson was a visiting researcher with The Junction from 2013-2016. He is currently an Irish Research Council Fellow at Maynooth University.

Please click here for more information or vist the site here.

 

2017-10-18 # Transitional Justice and the
Politics of Inscription

Heritage Angel Awards Northern Ireland
Thursday 19th October 2017
Ulster Museum from 7.00pm

What we know of war is always mediated knowledge and feeling. We need lenses to filter out some of its blinding, terrifying light.

Winter reveals the ways in which different creative arts have framed our meditations on war, from painting and sculpture to photography, film and poetry, and ultimately to silence, as a language of memory in its own right. He shows how these highly mediated images of war, in turn, circulate through language to constitute our ‘cultural memory’ of war.

Please click here for more information 

 

2017-08-30 WAR BEYOND WORDS

First World War Centenary Partnership
(IWM) Northern Ireland
Meeting 
Public Record Office of Northern Ireland
Thu 23 November 2017 10:30 – 15:30 GMT


Join us for a morning of discussion, networking and workshops at the Public Record Office Northern Ireland, looking at First World War commemorations for 2017-2018. This meeting will give you the opportunity to share current and upcoming First World War projects, discover more about resources available, and discuss plans for 2018. We do hope you will be able to join us.

For more information, please email extranet1914@iwm.org.uk or click here for more information 

2017-10-23 # First World War Centenary Partnership IWM

WW1 Event : Talk: Reformed Always to be Reformed, the Reformations then and now by Professor Johnston McMaster
Irish Linen Centre & Lisburn Museum

23rd October 2017 starting at 7.00pm

 Irish Linen Centre (LISBURN)

2017-10-ALL - Irish Linen Centre

Johnston is a Senior Research Writer with the Ethical and Shared Remembering Project. He discusses his recent publication which outlined the Reformation as a long lasting revolution in European history. Johnston discusses what ‘reformed theolog’ might look like in relation to other globalised religions.

Lisburn Museum The 2017 programme continues to reflect significant events for Irish soldiers serving in the Great War as well as marking the quincentenary of the Reformation. Of particular note, is the open session on Saturday 28 October, an extra opportunity to quiz staff from the In Flanders Fields Museum on battle history in Belgium.  The full programme can be viewed at https://www.lisburnmuseum.com/2017/09/free-autumn-talks-programme-2017/  All events are free but tickets are required.  These may be booked in advance through Lisburn Museum Reception, ilc.reception@lisburncastlereagh.gov.uk  Tel. 028 92663377


WW1 Event : Talk: Luther and his Legacy by Reverend Dr Martyn Cowan
Irish Linen Centre & Lisburn Museum

24th October 2017 starting at 7.00pm

 Irish Linen Centre (LISBURN)

2017-10-ALL - Irish Linen Centre

Martyn is a lecturer in Historical Theology, Union Theological College, Belfast. His talk looks at the repercussions of the Wittenberg event of 31 October 1517. Loved by some, loathed by others, this talk provides an accessible introduction to the real Luther, who is without doubt one of the most important figures in religious history. Martyn will trace events that brought about Luther's own personal reformation and explain how the ideas that sprang from it led to transformational events in Western history that have shaped not only our religious context but the wider culture in which we live today.

Lisburn Museum The 2017 programme continues to reflect significant events for Irish soldiers serving in the Great War as well as marking the quincentenary of the Reformation. Of particular note, is the open session on Saturday 28 October, an extra opportunity to quiz staff from the In Flanders Fields Museum on battle history in Belgium.  The full programme can be viewed at https://www.lisburnmuseum.com/2017/09/free-autumn-talks-programme-2017/  All events are free but tickets are required.  These may be booked in advance through Lisburn Museum Reception, ilc.reception@lisburncastlereagh.gov.uk  Tel. 028 92663377


The October Revolution in Russia: The Impact of Communism in Ireland
Heritage Cafe at PRONI

25th October 2017 from 9.30 am to 3.00 pm

Public Record Office of Northern Ireland

To coincide with the 100th anniversary of the October Revolution, PRONI is pleased to invite you to a conference exploring the Impact of Communism in Ireland, to be held at the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI) on 25 October 2017 at 10.00am.

https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/articles/october-revolution-russia-impact-communism-ireland

 

  • From February to October: Competing Visions of Revolution by Professor Ian Thatcher     
  • Bolshevism as foreign policy: Irish Labour and the October revolution by Professor Emmett O'Connor     
  • Women & the Russian Revolution by Professor Mary Davis       
  • PRONI Sources by Stephen Scarth The Russian Revolution and its Legacy: A Trade Union Perspective by Sean Byers
  • Lessons of 1917 and the role of the Communist Party of Ireland by Joe Bowers      
  • The impact of the October Revolution in Ireland: the Limerick Soviet of 1919 by Dr Conor Kostick   

WW1 Event : The Irish Convention of 1917-1918: The Last Hope of Averting Partition?
Council Chamber, Belfast City Hall
Thursday 26 Octob
er 2017 6.30pm

belfast city council logo

At present we are remembering a decade of key historical moments that shaped the history of Northern Ireland and Ireland a century ago. The period from 1912 - 1922 witnessed some dramatic changes. Now, one hundred years on, we are taking time to explore some of the significant events in more detail.

This season we will look at the Irish Convention, which was an initiative by the Prime Minister David Lloyd George who launched it saying that ‘Ireland should try her hand at hammering out an instrument of government for her own people.’

We will also look at the changing politics of the time, exploring the role of women in politics, following the extension of the vote with the Representation of the People Act in February 1918. The extension of the vote under this act made the General Election of 1918 historic in more ways than one and we will explore this election in detail.

In 1917, we also witnessed the Russian Revolutions and how this impacted on World War I, which was still ongoing throughout this period. We will explore this, and the connection with Belfast.

All of these events are free to attend, however, registration is essential and spaces are limited. If you would like to attend any of these events and have any particular access requirements please contact our Good Relations Unit on 028 9027 0663 or email goodrelations@elfastcity.gov.uk

 http://www.belfastcity.gov.uk/events/Event-82836.aspx

In Praise of Forgetting
Thursday 26th October 2017 from 6.00pm
Canada Room, Queen's University

The conventional wisdom about historical memory is summed up in George Santayana’s celebrated phrase, ‘Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.’ Today, the consensus that it is moral to remember, immoral to forget, is nearly absolute. And yet is this right?

David Rieff, an independent writer who has reported on bloody conflicts in Africa, the Balkans, and Central Asia, insists that things are not so simple. He poses hard questions about whether remembrance ever truly has, or indeed ever could, ‘inoculate’ the present against repeating the crimes of the past. He argues that rubbing raw historical wounds—whether self-inflicted or imposed by outside forces—neither remedies injustice nor confers reconciliation. If he is right, then historical memory is not a moral imperative but rather a moral option—sometimes called for, sometimes not. Collective remembrance can be toxic. Sometimes, Rieff concludes, it may be more moral to forget.

Please click here for more information 

 

2017-08-25 # IN PRAISE OF FORGETTING
WW1 Event : Talk: The Irish Contribution to the Great War in Belgium, Piet Chielens, In Flanders Fields Museum
Irish Linen Centre & Lisburn Museum

27th October 2017 starting at 7.00pm

 Irish Linen Centre (LISBURN)

2017-10-ALL - Irish Linen Centre

Piet’s talk gives an overview of the part played by Irish regiments from the first month of the war. His focus is on the roles taken by the 16th (Irish) and 36th (Ulster) divisions in 1917 and of the Ulster Division in 1918, from the German Spring Offensive to the Final Advance in Flanders. Piet is joined by his colleague Annick Vandenbilcke.

Lisburn Museum The 2017 programme continues to reflect significant events for Irish soldiers serving in the Great War as well as marking the quincentenary of the Reformation. Of particular note, is the open session on Saturday 28 October, an extra opportunity to quiz staff from the In Flanders Fields Museum on battle history in Belgium.  The full programme can be viewed at https://www.lisburnmuseum.com/2017/09/free-autumn-talks-programme-2017/  All events are free but tickets are required.  These may be booked in advance through Lisburn Museum Reception, ilc.reception@lisburncastlereagh.gov.uk  Tel. 028 92663377


Why the First World War Failed to End
Friday 27th October 2017 from 7.00pm
Ulster Museum

Without the Great War, much of Europe’s history in the twentieth century cannot be adequately explained. The rise of fascism and bolshevism, or the escalation of an even more violent conflict between 1939 and 1945 are unthinkable without the Great War. One hundred years after the end of the Great War, the legacies of that conflict still haunt us today, be it in Ireland or – even more strikingly – in the Middle East and in the current conflict between Russia and the Middle East. Here, the Great War raised questions that remain unanswered even today.

Please click here for more information 

 

2017-08-30 WHY THE FIRST WORLD WAR FAILED TO END
WW1 Event : Open Workshop with Piet Chielens and Annick Vandenbilcke, In Flanders Fields Museum
Irish Linen Centre & Lisburn Museum

28th October 2017 starting at 11.00am

 Irish Linen Centre (LISBURN)

2017-10-ALL - Irish Linen Centre

For those who have never been able to visit In Flanders Fields Museum or the graves of loved ones fallen in Flanders, this is an opportunity to learn more about what was happening at the time. This session will be of personal or professional significance to anyone with an interest in First World War history, a rare opportunity to quiz two inspirational experts on details of Flanders’ battles, to ask where more information can be found and to learn more about the important work of In Flanders Fields Museum.

Lisburn Museum The 2017 programme continues to reflect significant events for Irish soldiers serving in the Great War as well as marking the quincentenary of the Reformation. Of particular note, is the open session on Saturday 28 October, an extra opportunity to quiz staff from the In Flanders Fields Museum on battle history in Belgium.  The full programme can be viewed at https://www.lisburnmuseum.com/2017/09/free-autumn-talks-programme-2017/  All events are free but tickets are required.  These may be booked in advance through Lisburn Museum Reception, ilc.reception@lisburncastlereagh.gov.uk  Tel. 028 92663377


WW1 Event : The Russian Revolution and World War I
Banqueting Hall, Belfast City Hall
Monday 27 November 2017 6.30pm

belfast city council logo

At present we are remembering a decade of key historical moments that shaped the history of Northern Ireland and Ireland a century ago. The period from 1912 - 1922 witnessed some dramatic changes. Now, one hundred years on, we are taking time to explore some of the significant events in more detail.

This season we will look at the Irish Convention, which was an initiative by the Prime Minister David Lloyd George who launched it saying that ‘Ireland should try her hand at hammering out an instrument of government for her own people.’

We will also look at the changing politics of the time, exploring the role of women in politics, following the extension of the vote with the Representation of the People Act in February 1918. The extension of the vote under this act made the General Election of 1918 historic in more ways than one and we will explore this election in detail.

In 1917, we also witnessed the Russian Revolutions and how this impacted on World War I, which was still ongoing throughout this period. We will explore this, and the connection with Belfast.

All of these events are free to attend, however, registration is essential and spaces are limited. If you would like to attend any of these events and have any particular access requirements please contact our Good Relations Unit on 028 9027 0663 or email goodrelations@elfastcity.gov.uk

 http://www.belfastcity.gov.uk/events/Event-82836.aspx

An analysis of the General Election of 1918 and the first meeting of Dail Eireann in the Mansion House in January 1919
Banqueting Hall, Belfast City Hall
Thursday 18 January 2018 6.30pm

belfast city council logo

At present we are remembering a decade of key historical moments that shaped the history of Northern Ireland and Ireland a century ago. The period from 1912 - 1922 witnessed some dramatic changes. Now, one hundred years on, we are taking time to explore some of the significant events in more detail.

This season we will look at the Irish Convention, which was an initiative by the Prime Minister David Lloyd George who launched it saying that ‘Ireland should try her hand at hammering out an instrument of government for her own people.’

We will also look at the changing politics of the time, exploring the role of women in politics, following the extension of the vote with the Representation of the People Act in February 1918. The extension of the vote under this act made the General Election of 1918 historic in more ways than one and we will explore this election in detail.

In 1917, we also witnessed the Russian Revolutions and how this impacted on World War I, which was still ongoing throughout this period. We will explore this, and the connection with Belfast.

All of these events are free to attend, however, registration is essential and spaces are limited. If you would like to attend any of these events and have any particular access requirements please contact our Good Relations Unit on 028 9027 0663 or email goodrelations@elfastcity.gov.uk

 http://www.belfastcity.gov.uk/events/Event-82836.aspx

The Representation of the People Act 1918, and its impact on women in politics
Banqueting Hall, Belfast City Hall
Thursday 8 February 2018 6.30pm

belfast city council logo

At present we are remembering a decade of key historical moments that shaped the history of Northern Ireland and Ireland a century ago. The period from 1912 - 1922 witnessed some dramatic changes. Now, one hundred years on, we are taking time to explore some of the significant events in more detail.

This season we will look at the Irish Convention, which was an initiative by the Prime Minister David Lloyd George who launched it saying that ‘Ireland should try her hand at hammering out an instrument of government for her own people.’

We will also look at the changing politics of the time, exploring the role of women in politics, following the extension of the vote with the Representation of the People Act in February 1918. The extension of the vote under this act made the General Election of 1918 historic in more ways than one and we will explore this election in detail.

In 1917, we also witnessed the Russian Revolutions and how this impacted on World War I, which was still ongoing throughout this period. We will explore this, and the connection with Belfast.

All of these events are free to attend, however, registration is essential and spaces are limited. If you would like to attend any of these events and have any particular access requirements please contact our Good Relations Unit on 028 9027 0663 or email goodrelations@elfastcity.gov.uk

 http://www.belfastcity.gov.uk/events/Event-82836.aspx