Research

Scientists pioneer new concrete corrosion sensors

Scientists pioneer new concrete corrosion sensors

Dr Su Taylor from the School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering

Scientists at Queen’s have made a major breakthrough in developing sensors which dramatically improve the ability to spot early warning signs of corrosion in concrete.

The sensors, which are more resilient and much longer lasting than traditional corrosion sensors, will make monitoring the safety of structures such as bridges and vital coastal defences much more effective.

The research, which was carried out over a four-year period, was in conjunction with researchers at City University London, and was funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Dr Su Taylor from the School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering said: “Because the sensors can withstand long-term placement within concrete, unlike any equivalent sensors currently available, they can constantly monitor conditions, enabling a warning to be sent when conditions for corrosion threshold have been crossed. Thanks to an internet connection, the notification can be sent in the form of an email or text to the structure’s maintenance team."

Traditional optical corrosion sensors have only a limited lifetime, usually of several weeks, because of the corrosive alkaline levels within concrete. The new sensors are expected to last for several years, with proper protection, even where pH levels are high.

Related links:

http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/SchoolofPlanningArchitectureandCivilEngineering/

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David Hughes on 13 Feb 2012 said:

This is a wonderful break through, cutting edge technology - Su is to be congratulated!!