Queen's University and Riddel Hall

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Queen’s University Belfast

The University is situated in a tree lined Victorian suburb renowned for its restaurants, bars, theatres and fine architecture. It is one mile from the City centre, is convenient to both the City and International Airports and is well served by public transport.

Its unique blend of the historic and the modern offers an ideal venue for conferences, business meetings, exhibitions and presentations.

Set in its own landscaped grounds, Riddel Hall has been sympathetically renovated to retain many of its original features but incorporating the highest standard of modern technology.

The Centre comprises 9 syndicate rooms for 12-20 delegates and 4 larger lecture rooms which can accommodate 40-80 persons. There are two Executive lounges and a range of break out spaces throughout the building. The original external courtyard has been enclosed by a glass roof and is now a multifunctional space with a capacity of 290 theatre style or 150 for banqueting.

Alongside Riddel Hall and linked by two glass walkways is a newly built Conferencing Centre with a lecture theatre for 110 and function space for up to 290 theatre style.

Catering at Riddel Hall is provided by our in-house team and can be planned to suit any event from small meetings to gala dinners.

The lawns and external courtyard can be used for conference breaks or evening receptions.

All rooms are fully equipped with modern AV equipment and the facility benefits from

providing on-site car parking for delegates

Northern Ireland

Prospective visitors will be reassured to learn that the international media has described Belfast as "Europe's friendliest - and trendiest - regional capital."

The Times of London has also named the city as one of its top 12 world travel destinations, while leading youth lifestyle magazines have described Belfast as "buzzing with life" and "one of today's most fashionable places to visit and live in."

"Its people are the most honest, cheerful, friendly and well-mannered in the British Isles," enthused a Daily Telegraph columnist.