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What's on at Queen's - All Events

Ayurveda: An Introduction, Group 1

Ayurveda is the ancient healing system of India. It is rooted in the principle that spirit, mind and body are inextricably linked. According to Ayurveda, each of us has a unique psycho/physiological body type, which determines our individual traits and tendencies. In this workshop you will learn about your constitution and how to appreciate and make the best use of your unique qualities. Inappropriate diet and lifestyle lead to certain symptoms which in turn will eventually cause disease. We will look at practical diet and lifestyle changes you can make to bring balance into your life, address symptoms and help prevent disease.

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History Staff-Postgrad Seminar: John Harris, ‘Circuits of Capital, Circuits of Sorrow: financing the mid-19 century illegal trans-Atlantic Slave trade’

John Harris (John Hopkins University), ‘Circuits of Capital, Circuits of Sorrow: Financing the Mid-nineteenth Century Illegal Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade’ About John Harris: http://history.jhu.edu/directory/john-harris/

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Authority and the Teacher

The notions of authority in education has become an increasingly negative concept, regarded by some as championed only by the rigid traditionalists and those who cling on to outdated educational theory and philosophy. 'Authority and the Teacher', seeks to overturn the notion that authority is a restrictive force within education, serving only to stifle creativity and drown out the vice of the student. William H. Kitchen argues that any education must have, as one of its cornerstones, a component which encourages the fullest development of knowledge, which serves as the great educational emancipator. In this version of knowledge-driven education, the teacher's authority should be absolute, so as to ensure that the teacher has the scope to liberate their pupils. The pupil, in the avoidance of ignorance, can thus embrace what is rightfully theirs; the inheritance of intellectual riches passed down through time. By invoking the work of three major philosophers - Polanyi, Oakeshott and Wittgenstein - as well as contributions from other key thinkers on authority, William Kitchen underpins previous claims for the need for authority in education with the philosophical clout necessary to ensure these arguments permeate modern mainstream educational thinking.  Schedule 1:45pm – 2:00pm    Arrival and Registration 2:00pm – 2:10pm    Welcome Professor Paul Connolly, Head of School of Education 2:10pm – 2:50pm    Authority and the Teacher William H. Kitchen 2:50pm – 3:30pm    The death of the progressive, constructivist curriculum in Northern Ireland Mr Robert McCartney QC 3:30pm – 3:50pm    Break 3:50pm – 4:30pm    Sociological and Historical Authority Professor Frank Furedi 4:30pm – 5:00pm    Discussion and Questions Click here for the Flyer

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Act French!

This two half-day workshop over 2 Wednesdays will suit students with an intermediate level of French. It will provide opportunities for students to improve their communication skills in French while improving their pronunciation, developing their vocabulary and boosting their confidence. The workshop will consist of short, guided improvisations, writing short scripts and acting out short scenes from famous French works.

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Analogue-Digital Dialogues in Contemporary Experimental Film'

Dr Kim Knowles

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CONCERT: John Butcher

John Butcher was born in Brighton, England and has lived in London since the late 1970s. His music ranges through improvisation, his own compositions, multitracked pieces and explorations with feedback and extreme acoustics. Originally a theoretical physicist, he published his Ph.D in 1982 and then left academia for music. He has since collaborated with hundreds of musicians, mostly involved with improvisation - including Derek Bailey, John Stevens, Gerry Hemingway, Polwechsel, Gino Robair, Rhodri Davies, John Edwards, Toshimaru Nakamura, Eddie Prevost, Paul Lovens, Christian Marclay and Andy Moor. Compositions include “Penny Wands” for reconstructed Futurist Intonarumori, pieces for the Rova and Quasar saxophone quartets, “somethingtobesaid” for the John Butcher Group and “Tarab Cuts” with Mark Sanders. In 2011 he was one of three recipients of the Paul Hamlyn Foundation Awards for Composers. Alongside long term collaborations he particularly values playing in occasional encounters, which have ranged from large groups such as Butch Morris’ London Skyscraper and the EX Orkestra, to duo concerts with Fred Frith, John Tilbury, Otomo Yoshihide, Matthew Shipp, Tony Buck and Akio Suzuki. Butcher is also well known as a solo saxophonist who attempts to engage with a sense of place. The well received “Resonant Spaces” CD is a collection of site- specific performances recorded during a tour of unusual locations in Scotland and the Orkney Islands. JOHN BUTCHER - http://www.johnbutcher.org.uk/

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USIHS Lecture: Dr Jeff Kildea - 'The Irish ANZACs project'

Ulster Society for Irish Historical Studies meeting Speaker: Dr Jeff Kildea (UCD), 'The Irish ANZACs project' All welcome The Irish Anzacs Project is a significant research undertaking of the Global Irish Studies Centre at UNSW, made possible by a grant from the Irish government's Emigrant Support Program. The project aims to identify all Irish-born enlistments in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) during the First World War, or as close to all as is practicable, and to compile a publicly accessible database containing information on each of them. The database will provide families with information on their Irish-born family members who served in the AIF as well as providing statistical information to assist researchers understand the contribution of the Irish to the Australian war effort. See http://jeffkildea.com/books/anzacs-and-ireland/

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History Staff-Postgrad Seminar: Cara Hanley, ‘Portrayals of gender and sexuality in early modern English and European images of witchcraft’

Cara Hanley (UU), ‘Portrayals of gender and sexuality in early modern English and European images of witchcraft’ All welcome

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Making sense of the beat: How humans use information across the senses to coordinate movements to a beat

Dr Mark Elliott, University of Birmingham presents a research seminar titled: "Making sense of the beat: How humans use information across the senses to coordinate movements to a beat". Research Seminars take place on Fridays at 4pm in Classroom 02.525, David Keir Building. For further information contact Mihalis Doumas, School of Psychology

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How to Write for Profit and Pleasure, Group 1

The award-winning journalist and author, Alf McCreary, shares his experience and outlines how people with limited or no background in writing can be helped to turn their ideas into print. This is an informative, enjoyable and successful course by a professional writer with wide experience who will cover the major aspects of creative writing, editing and publishing.

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An Introduction to Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, Group 1

This is a one-day experiential introduction to Mindfulness. It has been known for centuries in the meditative tradition that the sustained practice of mindfulness meditation can have profoundly healing and transformative effects in one’s life. Mindfulness is the ability to engage with the present moment without stress provoking negative judgments. Participants will learn the basic units of Mindfulness in action.

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Researching First World War Ancestors

Was your ancestor in the army, navy or air force? Do you want to know where to find records of service or death? This workshop will provide you with the information you need. Students should have some familiarity with using computers and the internet as some time will be set aside to look at the most useful websites and databases.

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Performance: Days in the Bay

A short performance devised by the Tiger’s Bay Men’s Group and inspired by the disappearing streetscape of North Belfast Brian Friel Theatre, Queen’s University, Sunday 2nd November 2014 at 7pm Duncairn Community Centre, Monday 3rd November at 6.30pm and 7.30pm

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Why (nearly) everything you thought you knew about Milgram is wrong: A new psychology of toxic obedience

Professor Stephen Reicher of University of St Andrews presents a research seminar titled: "Why (nearly) everything you thought you knew about Milgram is wrong: A new psychology of toxic obedience". Please note this is not taking place in the usual seminar time or venue. The time is 4pm on Monday 3rd November, the venue is the School of Psychology Board Room, 02.527 David Keir Building. Research Seminars usually take place on Fridays at 4pm in Classroom 02.525, David Keir Building. For further information contact Mihalis Doumas, School of Psychology

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Symposium on Protein Purification and Analysis in Agricultural Technology

Free Symposium from GE Healthcare in association with Queen’s University, Belfast. Join us for a day of discussion and insight into protein purification and analysis in agricultural technology. A lunchtime poster session will also take place with prizes sponsored by Aquilant Scientific. Please send your abstract to: bev.cummings@ge.com

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