Public Events

Events open to the Public

"From bench-side to curbside: maximizing obesity research to impact health"

Seminar by Grace O'Malley for info on the speaker go to: http://ie.linkedin.com/pub/grace-o-malley/9/352/67a. Part of the CoE Seminar Series

Go to Website

Inaugural Lecture by Professor Jayne Woodside

Inaugural Lecture by Professor Jayne Woodside: ‘An apple a day…is it really enough?’

Go to Website

Heritage and Identity in a Globalising World

This interdisciplinary conference seeks to examine the concept and development of heritage within an academic discourse -- in particular the way in which heritage studies have developed in response to various critiques of political, cultural, and social globalisation and transnationalism. Presentations will be given by established scholars and postgraduate students. Our keynote speaker, Professor John Wilson Foster (QUB Honorary Research Fellow), will present on the RMS Titanic, heritage and Belfast. Panels will focus on topics ranging from food tourism and cultural unionism. Panellists are as follows: Linda Maher (UCD) Kevin McNicholl (QUB) Adriana Salas (UCD) Erin Hinson (QUB) Elaine O’Driscoll (UCC) Julia Andrade Rocha (QUB) Lauren Ferguson (QUB) Lisa Bogert (QUB) Frances Harkin (QUB)

Go to Website

Inaugural Lecture by Professor Chris Patterson

Inaugural Lecture by Professor Chris Patterson: 'Epidemiology counts - childhood diabetes matters'

Go to Website

Seminar by Professor Steven Cummins LSHTM

Professor Steven Cummins "Measuring environmental exposure in physical activity and diet research: some thoughts from the ORIEL and other studies" Everyone welcome Sandwich lunch provided

Go to Website

'The Scottish Independence Referendum and Northern Ireland’

A half-day workshop organised by the Constitutional Futures Interdisciplinary Research Group in the Institute for Study of Conflict Transformation and Social Justice, QUB, with Prof James Mitchell, University of Edinburgh and funded by the ESRC.

Further information

Go to Website

Sound Documents Curated by Pedro Rebelo

Sound field recording has become powerful tool for capturing the everyday as well as the extraordinary and the unfamiliar. Collating sounds through recording on location can act as a way of understanding an unknown city or telling a personal story. This concert presents recent works by SARC composers that take a quasi-documentary approach to composition. The pieces in the programme tell a story of place and people and reveal a sound world for engagement and reflection.

Go to Website

The Chief Executives' Club at Queen's and the Centre for Irish Business and Economic Performance

Denis O'Brien
'Doing Business in Ireland and Globally'
In Conversation with the Irish Entrepreneur

For further information

Go to Website

Performing Boucicault in Belfast: Recreational Rioting on & Off Stage

This public lecture examines the phenomenon of “Irish Nights” in the playhouses of late Belfast. These occasions featured the performances of popular, political melodramas that provoked a riotous response from working class audiences, who flocked to the theatre in their droves. Described as “melodramas within melodramas,” Irish Nights were unique to Belfast given its context as a crucible of sectarian conflict in this period, however, the lack of “real” rioting outside theatres on these occasions suggests these in-house ructions were mock ones and part of the night out. Nevertheless, they helped consolidate the city’s notorious reputation as being a tough place to play, with some artists remarking “if you could survive Belfast and Glasgow, you could survive anywhere.”

Go to Website

Stage Irish(?): A Miscellany of Dion Boucicault’s Irish Melodramas Directed by Tim Loane

Until relatively recently, official histories of Irish theatre were characterised by Abbey Theatre director Hugh Hunt’s view that this vital Victorian period of drama dominated by Dion Boucicault was “best forgotten”- an attitude shared by the same institution’s founders, W.B. Yeats and Lady Gregory, who despised the popular theatre stage (and the plebs who packed it). And yet, Boucicault’s influence is pervasive. It ghosts generations of later playwrights’ work: the comic double-acts and music hall knockabout of O’Casey, Beckett, and Behan. Even Conn the Shraughraun’s famous wake scene – fittingly restaged in Parker’s play to enact Boucicault’s stage exit from life – shadows Synge’s Riders to the Sea.
In recent years, historians, scholars and practitioners have helped to recuperate Boucicault’s work and to demolish earlier attitudes that disregarded him as a cheap hack. Audiences too have also demonstrated their appreciation of his work as several recent productions by the Abbey and Druid Theatres, and the National Theatre, London have played to packed houses. In the second event of this new initiative between Drama and English, Tim Loane will direct selected excerpts from Boucicault’s classic melodramas The Shraughraun, the Colleen Dawn and Arraghna-Pogue. This miscellany is intended to give an impressionistic overview of some of his most successful works.

Go to Website

Women, Law and Disorder: 2015 International Women’s Day Conference

Dependents, delinquents, rebels, citizens, soldiers, suffragettes, lawmakers – women have historically occupied a variety of roles in relation to the law. This 2015 conference, in celebration of International Women’s Day, seeks to examine the multi-faceted nature of women’s relationship with the law from ancient to modern times. It will explore the ways in which governments and institutions have recognised, restricted and engaged their female citizens, as well as the ways that women have worked within, challenged and shaped the law.

More info and CFP at: http://iwd2015.wordpress.com/

Go to Website

Pain in childhood: the importance of parental responses & family functioning

​The School of Psychology seminar series continues on Friday 6th March at 4pm in room 02.525.

Dr Line Caes, NUI Galway presents a talk titled: Pain in childhood: the importance of parental responses and family functioning

http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/psy/Research/Seminars/

Go to Website

Ayurveda: An Introduction, Group 2

Ayurveda is the ancient healing system of India. It is rooted in the principle that spirit, mind and body are inextricably linked. According to Ayurveda, each of us has a unique psycho/physiological body type, which determines our individual traits and tendencies. In this workshop you will learn about your constitution and how to appreciate and make the best use of your unique qualities. Inappropriate diet and lifestyle lead to certain symptoms which in turn will eventually cause disease. We will look at practical diet and lifestyle changes you can make to bring balance into your life, address symptoms and help prevent disease.

Go to Website

Institute of Irish Studies 50th Anniversary Event

Seminar: Dr Laura McAtackney (UCD), 'Following the fighters: female experiences of imprisonment during the Irish Civil War 1922-23'

Followed by a reception to0 mark the 50th anniversary of the foundation of the Institute of Irish Studies

All welcome

Go to Website

The Book Thing

In association with Seamus Heaney Centre, Queen’s University Belfast In a recent report by Save the Children, literacy and reading for under 11s was highlighted as one of the key priorities in changing the future prospects of children living in high deprivation in the UK. At the same time, the canon of Northern Irish writers in fiction, poetry, film and stage is recognized as one of our greatest international calling cards. How do we connect the two? How do we encourage children and young people to tell stories and love literature? How we do we harness the power of telling stories in different forms? These issues will be addressed by a panel of distinguished writers, academics and educators including Garrett Carr, Roddy Doyle, Bruce Ingman, David Lucas, Rory O’Connor, Liam O’Hare, Louise O’Neill, Glenn Patterson, Axel Scheffler, Damian Smyth, Pádraic Whyte and Sheena Wilkinson. The launch of Fighting Words Belfast will take place following these discussions. Fighting Words Belfast is a new creative writing project for children and young people. The project is a partnership between Young at Art, Skainos and 174 Trust.

Go to Website

Child Rights Education: what, where and why (and why not)?

SPEAKER: Lee Jerome, School of Education, QUB
The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child established children’s right to an education which promotes human rights, and established a duty on states to ensure children are informed about their rights. Taken together this provides a warrant for introducing some form of child rights education (CRE), that is, an education which teaches children about their rights and enables them to assume the role of rights holder. Drawing on a recently completed survey of 26 countries and seven more detailed country case studies, this paper reflects on the nature of CRE (what is it we want to achieve exactly?), the extent of implementation (what is, and is not, happening within the education systems of these countries to promote CRE?) and how progress can be secured (how have advocates made breakthroughs to promote CRE?). The answers to these questions provide enough glimpses of developed CRE that we can tease out a set of benchmarking statements, to help educators measure their progress against the best that is being achieved.

Go to Website

When the dust settles, who will be us? Futureproofing the arts A session in association with Young at Art as part of the Belfast Children’s Festival Tony Reekie

The debate on the sustainability of the arts and cultural sector often centres on the way it must diversify its funding base and its business model. But what are the leaders of the industry doing to secure its creative sustainability. In what way must our industry adapt to safeguard its artistic development? How does the sector innovate in periods of negative public policy and investment? And what are the challenges and difficult decisions heads of organisations face when they address sustainability of their whole sector and not just their organisation? Tony Reekie will speak with first-hand experience as the head of one of the UK’s leading development organisations in the field of theatre.
Session will include a Q&A chaired by Ali Fitzgibbon, CEO of Young at Art.

Go to Website

Pains of Youth By Ferdinand Bruckner in a version by Martin Crimp

Vienna, 1923. A discontented post-war generation diagnose youth to be their sickness and do their best to destroy it.
Bourgeois existence or suicide. There are no other choices.
Promiscuous, pitiless and bored, six sexually entangled medical students restlessly wander in and out of a boarding house, cramming, drinking, taunting, spying. Freder savagely experiments with the young, pretty maid while a part of him pines for his former lover, Desiree, a wild, disillusioned aristocrat. Petrell abandons Marie for the ruthless underdog Irene. Marie doesn’t waste any time weeping - Desiree wants her.

Book your tickets:  studentshows@qub.ac.uk

Go to Website

Southern Belles Abroad: The Musical Experiences of American Women in Europe before 1860 Dr Candace Bailey (N Carolina SU)

Seminar

Go to Website

From 20th Century Fox Studios to Century City Shopping Mall: Los Angeles and Motion Pictures in the 1960s and 1970s Dr. Mark Shiel (King’s College London)

Organised the Institute for Collaborative Research in the Humanities Research Group “Cinema and Architecture in the City”.

Go to Website

Postgraduate Roundtable

Seminar

Go to Website

Shared Future or Separate Development? The Political Economy of Education Policies in Northern Ireland

NICIE logo

2015 All Children Together Dunleath Lecture, hosted by the Centre for Shared Education, Queen’s University Belfast and NICIE: Shared Future or Separate Development? The Political Economy of Education Policies in Northern Ireland

SPEAKER: Professor Alan Smith Professor Alan Smith is holder of the UNESCO Chair in Education at the University of Ulster. His work has included research on education and the conflict in Northern Ireland, young people's understanding of human rights and the development of social, civic and political education.

Refreshments at 7pm, lecture starts 7.30pm, car parking available main QUB car park at the McClay Library at the top of Botanic Avenue.

For flyer click here

Go to Website

Explorations of Northern Irishness Symposium

Northern Ireland remains one of the most researched places on earth, and following the Good Friday Agreement has provided a template for the transition to a post-conflict society that has been exported globally. For a place so small it provides a diversiform political and social environment wherein identity and culture have an unusual salience. Overarching and unresolved questions of cultural, political, and historical legitimacy contour societal engagement to the extent it can create an existential threat to the structures of the state, and the individual. Led by post-graduate research students, representing a range of disciplines at Queen’s University Belfast, this symposium will discuss Northern Irish identity, its characteristics, history, problems, and future direction. This symposium is open to all, and will seek to build inter-disciplinary collaboration between participants for future impact and engagement on the importance of identity in modern Northern Ireland.

Go to Website

Sandeep Bhagwati

SANDEEP BHAGWATI is a composer, researcher, poet, theatre maker, installation artist, and conductor, born in India, a citizen of Germany now living in Montréal, Canada. In his work, he likes to ask himself questions that he cannot answer, set himself tasks that stymie him, and to break with practices that no one thinks are broken. In order to further foster and enhance his ignorance, he founded, in 2006, a research-creation lab at Concordia University, the matralab, where he and his team work on computer improvisation, interactive scores, invisible bodysuit scores and creative research into inter-traditional music and theatre forms, but also on the theoretical-artistic exploration of comprovisational technique, inter-traditional aesthetics and world-conscious art practices such as political performance, environmental sound art or responsive creation.

Go to Website

Inaugural Lecture, Prof. Richard Kennedy, CCRCB

'From Mustard Gas to Molecular Diagnostics, a Personal Journey in Personalized Cancer Treatment'

Go to Website

Experiences in Prepared Instruments, Live Electronics, and the Creation of New Electro-Acoustic Instruments Annette Krebs

Seminar

Go to Website

Judicial Deference to Administrative Agencies Determinations: How Different is Europe from the United States?

The concept of judicial deference has been developed in the United States as well as in UK, Canada and Ireland. It limits the scope of judicial review of administrative agencies’ actions in the light of agencies’ superior expertise and separation of powers arguments. The paper after presenting the foundations of the concept in U.S. law analyzes whether there are legal grounds for the validity of the concept of judicial deference in Continental Europe where it remains generally accepted that it is a role of courts (and not administrative agencies) to interpret the law. Standards stemming from Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights (the ECHR) are analyzed in order to answer the question whether deferential standard of review is permissible under the ECHR principle of full judicial review. The analysis of the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights leads—quite surprisingly—to the conclusion that there is a space for U.S.-like judicial deference under European fundamental rights framework. Dr Maciej Bernatt is an Assistant Professor at the Jean Monnet Chair in Eu-ropean Economic Law, Faculty of Management, University of Warsaw and as a law clerk and assistant of Chief Justice in the Polish Constitutional Court. He cooperates with the Centre for Antitrust and Regulatory Studies at the University of Warsaw as its scientific secretary. Maciej specializes in competi-tion law and constitutional law with focus on protection of fundamental rights (especially right to a fair hearing) as well as interplay between human rights and business.

Go to Website

Annette Krebs – Concert

Annette Krebs has studied classical music and lives since 1993 in Berlin. As a composer, performer and improviser she developed a musical style which is based among others on influences and inspirations from contemporary arts, classical and contemporary music. She is one of the founders of the Berlin movement “Echtzeitmusik”. She developed electro-acoustic solo pieces for loudspeakers, develops music for ensembles, video- and performance projects and works with many instrumentalists and artists in - and outside of Europe.

Go to Website

USIHS Lecture: Catherine Swift, 'Surname formation in Ireland: discussion, debates and DNA'

Dr Catherine Swift (MIC, University of Limerick) will speak on 'Surname formation in Ireland: discussion, debates and DNA'

All welcome

Go to Website

IRELAND PROFESSOR OF POETRY, LECTURE

PAULA MEEHAN ‘The Solace of Artemis’ Paula Meehan, Ireland Professor of Poetry delivers her second lecture during her three year tenure of the post. The full title of the lecture is ‘The Solace of Artemis: On Bears, On Memory and On Teachers’ and was inspired by a poem that she wrote in 2011 after reading the journal ‘Current Biology’.

Go to Website

An Introduction to Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, Group 4

This is a one-day experiential introduction to Mindfulness. It has been known for centuries in the meditative tradition that the sustained practice of mindfulness meditation can have profoundly healing and transformative effects in one’s life. Mindfulness is the ability to engage with the present moment without stress provoking negative judgments. Participants will learn the basic units of Mindfulness in action.

Go to Website

Everybody (Wants To Be The DJ)

This work is an interactive sound installation based around lived experiences of dance music and club culture. The piece dissects the art and science of DJ-ing and explores individual and collective identities formed through involvement with electronic music scenes both emergent and historic. It interrogates the notion that any given era was notably exceptional with a range of participants across three generations. The installation draws on people’s memories inside a club: the collective experience; the out-of body experience; the fleeting, microcosmic social experience. The story is told by those who know it best - DJs who have spent as much time on the dance floor as behind the decks. Everybody (Wants To Be The DJ) invites you to join them and have your moment. It asks whether techno and house music ever could or indeed still can save the world.

Go to Website

Developing Arts Audiences Margaret Henry (CEO Audiences NI)

Seminar

Go to Website

Diabetes Research Information Evening

Interested in finding out more about diabetes? This information evening on the Queen’s diabetes research programmes will include an overview of the current research from Professor Timothy Lyons, followed by brief talks from doctors and researchers working to prevent and cure diabetes and its complications. Following the short presentations there will be an opportunity to meet the clinicians and researchers. To register your attendance please email n.moroney@qub.ac.uk by Tuesday 10 March.

Go to Website

Nação Drummers: Music and Religious Modernity in the Extreme South of Brazil Dr Reginaldo Braga (QUB, visiting)

**Date changed from printed programme**

Seminar

Go to Website

Public Lecture: Prof. Brian Campbell, 'Roman Lessons'

Prof. Brian Campbell, Professor of Roman History at Queen's, will speak on 'Roman Lessons'.

Members of the public are welcome to attend.

The lecture will be followed by a reception.

Go to Website

St Andrews New Music Ensemble

A concert of new work from Scotland by the new music ensemble of St Andrews University. The programme will include works by Thea Musgrave and Sally Beamish, as well as the first performance of QUB composer Simon Mawhinney’s The Pinkbow at Backnamullagh. The St Andrews New Music Ensemble brings together musicians of the University who have a curiosity to explore music of the Twentieth Century and today. Rehearsing and performing on a project basis in close association with the St Andrews Chamber Orchestra, the ensemble has a flexible instrumental line-up and works with emerging and established composers: in recent years the ensemble has worked with Paul Mealor, Sally Beamish and Thea Musgrave. The ensemble holds an annual Call for Scores that receives a wide international response – many of the winning pieces have entered into the ensemble’s repertoire. In May 2015 the ensemble will perform at the Glasgow Minimalist Festival alongside the legendary composer Steve Reich.

Go to Website

MSc Public Policy Launch

The new MSc in Public Policy is a multi-disciplinary programme of executive education for public servants focused on the development of professional knowledge, competence and skills, and personal leadership. The programme's first intake will commence in September 2015 and run across 2 years, part-time. The Open Evening welcomes all civil and public servants who wish to find out more about the MSc in Public Policy programme and preparation for senior leadership roles. The evening will feature a Guest Lecture by Peter John, Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at University College London. Professor John will speak on the topic of Public Policy and Behaviour Change

Go to Website

Wiles Symposium: Remembering 1916: the Easter Rising, the Somme and the politics of memory

1916 witnessed two events that would profoundly shape both politics and commemoration in Ireland over the course of the following century. Although the Easter Rising and the battle of the Somme were important historical events in their own right, their significance also lay in how they came to be understood as iconic moments in the emergence of Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic.

The Easter Rising proved a source of legitimacy not only for the independent Irish state that emerged out of the War of Independence but for subsequent republican movements that sought to justify the continued use of violence for political ends. From the 1960s the Rising’s contested legacy became central to the emergence of acrimonious debates about the writing of Irish history that were further intensified and, unusually for historiographical disputes, given wide public purchase by the outbreak of the Troubles.

In Ulster the sacrifice of the 36th Division on the Western Front provided a key foundation myth for the Northern Irish state. As with the memory of the Rising for republicans, the Somme offered unionist and loyalist movements a potent source of political capital. Although long a contentious feature of the Irish commemorative landscape, as witnessed by its ubiquity in loyalist murals, the aftermath of the Good Friday Agreement has also seen the appropriation of the memory of the First World War to fashion a more conciliatory narrative of the shared Catholic and Protestant experience of war.

Adopting an interdisciplinary approach drawing on history, politics, anthropology and cultural studies, this colloquium will explore how the memory of these two iconic events has been constructed, mythologised and revised over the course of the past century. The aim is not merely to understand how the Rising and Somme came to exert a central place in how the past is viewed in Ireland, but to address this subject as a means of exploring wider questions about the relationship between history and memory.

Topics of interest to those beyond scholars of Irish history will include: the construction of communal memory, the role of commemoration in shaping national and political identity, and the relationship between academic history and public memory. Specific papers will address: the politics of memory and commemoration; the memorialisation of history; the shaping of collective memory; the influence of the Troubles on the history and memory of 1916; the role of the historian in engaging with popular memory and commemoration; the international impact of 1916; and how theories of memory can inform our understanding of commemoration and popular history.

More info at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/SchoolofHistoryandAnthropology/News/Conferences/Remembering1916theEasterRisingtheSommeandthepoliticsofmemory/#d.en.473724

Go to Website

Aspects of Belfast's History, Group 2

The growth of ‘modern’ Belfast began with Sir Arthur Chichester, who in 1603, was given land including Belfast for his part in the defeat of the Ulster Gaels in the Nine Years’ War. This field trip around central Belfast will tell the story, through the people, events and buildings that go to make up the history of the city. Meet at the front of the City Hall at 10.00 am.

Go to Website

Children’s reasoning about language as a social category

​The School of Psychology seminar series continues on Friday 27th March at 4pm in room 02.525.

Dr Jocelyn Dautel, QUB presents her talk titled: Children’s reasoning about language as a social category.

http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/psy/Research/Seminars/

Go to Website

those you pass on the Street By Laurence McKeown

Friday 27th March, 8pm
Saturday 27th March, 8pm

Elizabeth walks into a Sinn Fein constituency office seeking assistance regarding anti-social behaviour in her area. Frank takes her details and promises to look into it. He later learns she is the widow of an RUC man killed by the IRA, and is warned to tread carefully. This brief encounter poses challenges for personal preconceptions and beliefs, straining family and political loyalties.
****
Those You Pass on the Street explores the complexities of dealing with the legacy of conflict, especially when that conflict is localised and personal. It contrasts party political positioning with individual needs. It challenges the view that any mechanism for dealing with the past is simply about ‘whose side gets what’. This show will run for approx one hour and after Saturday’s performance, there will be a postshow discussion with the playwright, Dr Laurence McKeown; Kabosh’s artistic director, Paula McFetridge, chaired by Dr Mark Phelan

Go to Website

The legal needs of children and young people: the perspectives of young people and adult stakeholders

SPEAKERS: Lesley Emerson and Karen Orr, School of Education, QUB

This research, carried out on behalf of the Department of Justice, set out to explore the need for legal services for children and young people (CYP) in Northern Ireland (NI). Interviews were carried out with key stakeholders with direct experience of the legal needs of CYP, a wide range of focus groups with CYP and an online survey of post-primary school pupils to ascertain their knowledge and understanding of their legal rights and needs. The research indicates that the vulnerability of children and young people and their relative dependency on adults brings about specific legal needs, such as, inter alia: accurate assessment of competence; appropriate communication skills for adults engaging with children and young people; the recognition of children as rights-holders with the particular right to have their views sought, listened to and taken seriously; adequate time for cases so that meaningful consultation can occur at each stage of the legal process; need for legal specialism in relation to the issues faced by children and young people; age appropriate treatment by police; child friendly facilities and age appropriate court proceedings. In particular the seminar will focus on fundamental barriers to meeting the legal needs of children and young people: their lack of knowledge and understanding of their legal rights; their lack of confidence in relation to safely exercising their legal rights, for fear of repercussion; and their lack of willingness to exercise rights because they feel it would make little difference.

Go to Website

Screening: Amistad

The QUB Law School Film Group (QUB LSFG) invites you to a screening of the historical drama ‘Amistad’. All QUB LSFG screenings are hosted in accessible rooms and shown with English subtitles. This event is free and open to everyone - you do not have to be part of QUB, the Law School or Film Group to attend. The QUB Law School Film Group welcomes - film enthusiasts, scholars/students from all disciplines, and members of the public – to its monthly movie night. On the first Wednesday of every month we screen a film that relates to legal principles and the challenges they face.

Go to Website

Inaugural Lecture, Prof. R Williamson

Inaugural Lecture, Prof. Raymond Williamson, Centre for Dentistry “Of Rats and Rads and HBO”

Go to Website

CoE Seminar by Dr Anne Kouvonen

CoE Seminar by Dr Anne Kouvonen entitled - Availability and use of register data in epidemiological research in Finland

Go to Website

Sonorities Festival of Contemporary Music

Theme Fractured Narratives. The festival will feature a newly commissioned multi-channel work for the Sonic Lab from electroacoustic pioneer Denis Smalley. Also featured in the festival will be a major recent work by Trevor Wishart. For detailed information: www.sonorities.org.uk
‘Two Thousand + FIFTEEN Symposium on Fractured Narratives – Improvised sounds and stories’ Seminar on Saturday 25th April, see seminars at back of programme. Curated by Dr Franziska Schroeder, Koichi Samuels and Tullis Rennie with Keynote Speaker Cathy Lane, Professor of Sound Arts, University of the Arts London.
For details see: www.qub.ac.uk/sonorities/symposium_call.html

Go to Website

FULBRIGHT SCHOLARS

ERIKA MEITNER AND MARGOT BACKUS Erika Meitner is the author of four books of poetry—most recently Copia (BOA Editions, 2014), and Ideal Cities (HarperCollins, 2010), which was a 2009 National Poetry Series winner. Currently, she is an associate professor of English at Virginia Tech, where she teaches in the MFA program in creative writing, and lives in the mountains with her husband and two young sons. As a Fulbright Scholar, she will be teaching and working on her fifth poetry collection, Fragments from Holymoleyland. Margot (FitzGerald) Backus grew up in the midwestern US. As Associate Professor of English at the University of Houston, her areas of specialization include British and Irish modernisms and critical sexuality studies. Her book, The Gothic Family Romance: Heterosexuality, Child Sacrifice and the Anglo-Irish Colonial Order (Duke UP, 1999), won the American Conference for Irish Studies’ prize for a first book. Her second book is Scandal Work: James Joyce, the New Journalism, and the Home Rule Newspaper Wars (UNDP, 2013). As Fulbright scholar she will teach modules on modern Anglophone Irish literature, and twentieth-century Irish and Northern Irish scandals and scandal cultures, while researching the Kincora Boys’ Home scandal.

Go to Website

Two Thousand + FIFTEEN Symposium on Fractured Narratives – Improvised sounds and stories

Symposium

Go to Website

Managing Digital Innovation Dr. Oonagh Murphy (Writer, Lecturer and Arts Manager)

Seminar

Go to Website

Aesthetics and Irish Traditional Music, or, a Fiddle Player Reads Adorno Dr Martin Dowling (QUB)

Seminar

Go to Website

Caryl Churchill’s Top Girls Directed by Maggie Cronin

“If Margaret Thatcher wins on Thursday, I warn you not to be ordinary. I warn you not to be young. I warn you not to fall ill. I warn you not to get old.” Neil Kinnock, pre-general election speech, 1983.
Set in the early Thatcher years, Top Girls examines women’s lives and experiences at a time of great social change. Caryl Churchill daringly employs historical and modern characters to encounter each other, coincide and clash in this dazzling and poignant play. Their debate is, of course, still relevant today.
*For tickets please phone: 02890 971382 and email studentshows@qub.ac.uk

Go to Website

The Goldberg Variations

This recital offers a rare chance to hear a complete performance of Bach’s ‘Goldberg Variations’ (BWV 898), which was published by Balthasar Schmidt of Nuremberg in 1741. Pianist Daniel Martyn Lewis has performed throughout the UK and in his native Australia to much critical acclaim. He is now based in Wales; his professors have included Ronald Farren-Price (University of Melbourne), John Lill (London), Arnaldo Cohen (Royal Northern College of Music) and Richard McMahon (RWCMD). Daniel possesses a wide-ranging repertoire, although more particularly he is a specialist in the music of Bach and has made many original arrangements and transcriptions.

Go to Website

“Points of View: Multi-Roling Performance in Irish Theatre in 1990s” Dr David Grant

Seminar

Go to Website

GALLERY GOES

Eilean Ni Chuilleanain, Michael Coady and Tom French Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin’s collections include Acts and Monuments (1972), The Second Voyage (1977, 1986), The Rose Geranium (1981), The Magdalene Sermon (1989) which was shortlisted for the Irish Times/Aer Lingus Award, and The Girl Who Married the Reindeer (2001). Her Selected Poems was published in 2008. Michael Coady has published five collections with The Gallery Press: Two for a Woman, Three for a Man (1980), Oven Lane (1987. Revised 2014), All Souls (1997), One Another (2003) and Going by Water (2009). Tom French’s first collection Touching the Bones (Gallery Press, 2001) was awarded the Forward Prize for First Collection 2002. His latest collection, Midnightstown, was published in 2014. Presented in Association with Gallery Press

Go to Website

Examining Constructive Adaptation among Youth in Political Conflict

​The School of Psychology seminar series continues on Friday 6th March at 4pm in room 02.525.

Dr Laura Taylor, QUB presents her talk titled: Examining Constructive Adaptation among Youth in Political Conflict

http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/psy/Research/Seminars/

Go to Website

Roy Carroll Performing Electro-Acoustic Music: Possibilities and Approaches for Live Electronics and Fixed Media Interpretation

The workshop will focus on the following: i) Loudspeakers as instruments - preparations, piezo pickups, feedback, resonant tubes; ii) Techniques and approaches for multichannel composition and performance software, signal routing, probability / random processes across multiple channels. iii)Fixed media and live electronics interpretation and performance combining i) and ii) - related to the duo concert on 7th May.

Go to Website

Remembering Alien: The Generational Pleasures of a Scary Movie

Seminar with Professor Martin Barker (Emeritus Professor of Film and Television Studies at the Aberystwyth University)

Go to Website

Screening and Discussion: The Castle

The QUB Law School Film Group (QUB LSFG) invites you to a screening and discussion on the environmental comedy ‘The Castle’. The film will be followed by a discussion with environmental law experts. All QUB LSFG screenings are hosted in accessible rooms and shown with English subtitles. This event is free and open to everyone - you do not have to be part of QUB, the Law School or Film Group to attend. The QUB Law School Film Group welcomes - film enthusiasts, scholars/students from all disciplines, and members of the public – to its monthly movie night. On the first Wednesday of every month we screen a film that relates to legal principles and the challenges they face.

Go to Website

Scene from Within: Mark Applebaum’s Pre-Composition (2002) and Velimir Khlebnikov’s Mrs. Laneen (1913)

In these two works, separated by nearly a century, but strikingly akin in concept, the spectator/listener is invited into the psychical processes of another human being during a moment of heightened experience. For Pre-Composition, we are welcomed into the mind of a composer (Applebaum himself?) as he prepares his next piece. In Mrs. Laneen we enter the disordered mind of a woman in ill-health, possibly nearing death. The two pieces, presented together for the first time, offer a unique sound and theatre experience that presents a take on creativity and mental illness surprisingly consonant with current ideas in neuroscience.

Go to Website

Disassembler Roy Carroll: Electro-Acoustics with Izumi Kimura: Piano

Disassembler is a new group dedicated to the interpretation and performance of live electronic and fixed media concert works. Focused on exploring the physical / acoustic possibilities of electro-acoustic music through working with materials such as denuded loudspeakers, resonant / textured preparations, feedback, room acoustics / resonance, randomness / probability processes, instability. Disassembler favours close collaboration with composers, towards building a repertoire of luminous interpretations.

Go to Website

North meets South: Jimmy Fay in Conversation with Fiach MacConghail

QUB Drama are delighted to play host to a special conversation between Jimmy Fay, (Executive Producer of the Lyric Theatre) and Fiach MacConghail (Director of the Abbey Theatre), on the eve of an historic co-production between both theatres of Sean O’Casey’s classic play, Shadow of a Gunman.
As Fiach completes a decade in charge of the Abbey Theatre, and Jimmy his first year at the Lyric, it seems a timely occasion to invite you to join the artistic leaders of the two most important theatre institutions on the island of Ireland to reflect on past, present and future of Irish drama.
Admission is free and tickets are available at the door (capacity is limited to 120).

Go to Website

Brass Band and JAM

The University Brass Band teams up with JAM’s Junior and Senior Brass groups for a programme of classics and popular pieces.

Go to Website

Math-gender stereotypes, math performance, & math-related beliefs in early & middle childhood

​The School of Psychology seminar series continues on Friday 6th March at 4pm in room 02.525.

Dr Carlo Tomasetto, University of Bologna presents a talk titled: Princesses, knights, and numbers: Math-gender stereotypes, math performance, and math-related beliefs in early and middle childhood

http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/psy/Research/Seminars/

Go to Website

Mad Forest By Caryl Churchill

Did we have a Revolution or a putsch? Who was shooting on the 21st? And who was shooting on the 22nd? Was the army shooting on the 21st or did some shoot and some not shoot? Or were the Securitate disguised in army uniforms? And were they still shooting on the 22nd? Were they now disguised as Securitate? Where did the flags come from? Who put loudhailers in the square? How could they publish a newspaper so soon? Who got Ceausescu to call everyone together? Where are the bodies?
In December 1989, Romanian Communist Party Leader Nicolae Ceausescu’s regime was overthrown by the people of communist controlled Romania, during a series of violent protests, deadly riots and chaos in the capital. Shortly after the bloodbath Caryl Churchill and a group of students travelled to Bucharest and through interviews with people from all backgrounds, Churchill has complied the first hand accounts of the Revolution into the story of ‘Mad Forest’. The three act play set before, during and after the Revolution is thought provoking, gripping and entertaining. Presenting a wide-lensed account of Romanians from all walks of life, there is as much authenticity in the dialogue as in the silences.

Go to Website

Receiving the Approaching Memory: Aspects of Time in my Recent Music Dr Bryn Harrison (Huddersfield)

Seminar

Go to Website

Postgraduate Roundtable

Seminar

Go to Website

Liszt - The B Minor Sonata. Philip Edward Fisher - piano

This recital centres upon one of the pinnacles of the Romantic repertoire, the B minor Sonata by Liszt. Pianist Philip Edward Fisher is widely recognized as a unique performer of refined style and exceptional versatility whose tours have taken him across the United Kingdom to Italy, Austria, Denmark, Switzerland, Norway, Romania, the Ukraine, Japan, Kenya, Zimbabwe, and the United States. 2002 marked his New York debut at Alice Tully Hall, performing Rachmaninov’s Third Piano Concerto under the baton of Larry Rachleff. He has also appeared at Merkin Hall and Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Centre, while UK venues have included the Purcell Room, Wigmore Hall, Barbican Centre and Royal Festival Hall in London, Usher Hall in Edinburgh, the Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, and Symphony Hall in Birmingham.

Go to Website

Cultural Materialism, Performance and Gentrification Jen Harvie, Professor of Contemporary Theatre and Performance at Queen Mary University of London.

Seminar

Go to Website

QUB Big Band Spring Concert

A concert of summer favourites and evergreen classics from the popular QUB Big Band, to include swing, blues and ballad hits under the direction of maestro Steve Barnett.

Go to Website

The 2015 Wiles Lectures

The Wiles Lectures for 2015 will be delivered by Professor Lyndal Roper, Fellow of Oriel College and Regius Professor of History at the University of Oxford, on 27-30 May 2015. Professor Roper's Wiles lectures will be given over four days at Queen's University Belfast, on the theme: 'Luther and the Reformation: A Cultural History'.

More information at: http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/SchoolofHistoryandAnthropology/News/WilesLectureSeries/WilesLectures2015/

Go to Website

MA STUDENT READING

Readings from the current Creative Writing MA Students at the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry. A chance to hear future literary stars!

Go to Website

Cancer Outcomes Conference 2015: United Against Cancer

The National Cancer Intelligence Network (NCIN) Cancer Outcomes Conference 2015 in association with the United Kingdom and Ireland Association of Cancer Registries (UKIACR) and the N. Ireland Cancer Registry (NICR) will focus on ‘United Against Cancer’ locally, nationally and internationally. It will build on the theme of the 2014 conference “The power of Information” highlighting how cancer intelligence based on high quality data is improving the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and outcomes of cancer in the UK and beyond.

Venue: Europa Hotel, Belfast City Centre.

Early bird registration is open ends 31 March 2015. 

Abstract submission is open and closes on 13 February 2015. 

The Patient Bursary Scheme is open and closes on 27 March 2015.

The conference programme comprises of 5 plenary sessions and 12 parallel sessions for more information visit the conference website

During the 3 days of the conference there will a conference reception to be held at Belfast City Hall which will provide an excellent networking opportunity (limited availabilty).  Visit the website for more information.

There will also be a conference dinner held at Titanic Belfast on 9 June 2015 (limited availabilty) for booking information visit the website.

Go to Website

JAM 4

JAM Four programme students will present their work using creative music technologies in the Sonic Arts Research Centre.

Go to Website

Junior Academy of Music End-of-Year Summer Concert

All children attending four different JAM programmes will be showcasing their musicianship skills through choir singing, brass band playing, guitar and flute ensembles, as well as some performances using creative music technologies.

Go to Website