Civil Engineering with a year in industry (MENG) H205 | Courses | Queen's University Belfast
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Civil Engineering with a year in industry (MENG) H205

MEng|Undergraduate

Civil Engineering with a year in industry

Entry year
Academic Year 2023/24
Entry requirements
AAA
Duration
5 years (Full Time)
UCAS code
H205
Placement Year
Yes
  • Overview

    Civil engineers provide the infrastructure required to sustain life. This includes water and power, roads, railways, schools, hospitals, flood protection and the developed city skyline. They provide the technical skills needed to protect both the built and the natural environment..

    Civil Engineering was one of the founding degrees at Queen's, making it one of the oldest in the UK and Ireland. Staff lead high-quality research and are recognised for their excellence in teaching.

    Civil Engineering with a year in industry Degree highlights

    Professional Accreditations

    • Civil Engineering at Queens is an Academic Partner of the Institution of Civil Engineers and we have one of the highest graduate employment rates in the Russell Group of Universities.
      www.ice.org.uk
    • MEng Accredited CEng (Full)
      Accredited as fully satisfying the educational base for a Chartered Engineer (CEng).
      www.jbm.org.uk

    Career Development

    • Many of our students have gained international work placements through, for example IAESTE.
    "In school I had a keen interest in maths, physics and geography and civil engineering is in many ways a combination of these three subjects, developing how humans interact with the natural and built environment. Civil engineering is a global industry which intrigued me with the opportunity to travel and easily find a job. I greatly enjoyed my time at Queen’s and Belfast provides you with a great social setting as well as a good learning environment."

    Sam McIlwaine, Amey Consultin
  • Course content

    Course Structure

    IntroductionThis degree is designed to provide students with a good basis for a professional career as a chartered Civil Engineer. Emphasis is placed on the practical application of theory through design and laboratory work. The degrees contain an element of choice, but all students are required to take courses which will equip them with the technical, management and professional skills needed for a career in civil engineering. The university study is complemented by a year in industry.
    Stage 1Students study the fundamentals of civil engineering theory and practice. This forms the transition from the basic mathematics and sciences studied at secondary level to engineering applications.

    Stage 1 courses provide a foundation in engineering mathematics, construction materials, fluids mechanics, structural behaviour, surveying, and engineering design.
    Stage 2This is a very important year of study, when the major knowledge of civil engineering subjects and their application within design are developed.

    Students following the sandwich degree will take an Industrial Placement Year between Stages 2 and 3 for both BEng and MEng students, or between Stages 3 and 4 for MEng students.

    Stage 2 courses develop students’ understanding of the core areas of geotechnics, structures, mathematics, and design. Students specialise in civil engineering by taking hydraulics and highways.
    Stage 3Theory is applied in a professional context in Stage 3. Students can develop their knowledge in specialist subjects by choice of modules, and are introduced to management and economics within the civil engineering profession.

    All students undertake a major individual research project.

    Stage 3 courses extend students’ understanding of the core areas of geotechnics, structures, construction management, hydraulics and design.
    Stage 4 (Year in Industry)Placement Year.
    Stage 5The MEng is an Integrated Masters programme, therefore this stage is set at Masters level.

    In this year students develop knowledge of building construction and business management. They work in teams on large integrated designs, which form a substantial part of their studies. They broaden their knowledge through a wide choice of modules, while being required to take relevant core civil engineering subjects to advanced level.

    Stage 5 courses focus on design and construction management, and deepens students understanding of geotechnics, hydraulics and structures.

    People teaching you

    Danny McPolin

    Head of Civil Engineering

    Natural and Built Environment

    Contact Teaching Times

    Medium Group Teaching0 (hours maximum)
    typically 5 hours of practical classes, workshops or seminars each week
    Small Group Teaching/Personal Tutorial0 (hours maximum)
    typically 5 hours of tutorials (or later, project supervision) each week
    Personal Study0 (hours maximum)
    typically 15 hours studying and revising in your own time each week, including some guided study using handouts, online activities etc
    Large Group Teaching0 (hours maximum)
    typically 15 hours of lectures.

    Learning and Teaching

    At Queen’s, we aim to deliver a high quality learning environment that embeds intellectual curiosity, innovation and best practice in learning, teaching and student support to enable student to achieve their full academic potential.

    In Civil Engineering we do this by providing a range of learning experiences which enable our students to engage with subject experts, develop attributes and perspectives that will equip them for life and work in a global society and make use of innovative technologies and a world class library that enhances their development as independent, lifelong learners. Examples of the opportunities provided for learning on this course are:

    • E-Learning technologies
      Information associated with lectures and assignments is often communicated via a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) called Canvas. A range of e-learning experiences are also embedded in the degree through, for example: interactive group workshops in a flexible learning space; IT and statistics modules; podcasts and interactive web-based learning activities; opportunities to use specialist IT programmes associated with design in practicals and project- based work etc.
    • Lectures
      Introduce basic information about new topics as a starting point for further self-directed private study/reading. Lectures also provide opportunities to ask questions, gain some feedback and advice on assessments (normally delivered in large groups to all year group peers).
    • Personal Tutor
      Undergraduates are allocated a Personal Tutor during Stage 1 and 2 who meets with them on several occasions during the year to support their academic development.
    • Practicals
      Where you will have opportunities to develop technical skills and apply theoretical principles to real-life or practical contexts. You will be expected to attend a number of practicals per week depending on your year of study. These are designed to reinforce the core subjects you are studying.
    • Self-directed study
      This is an essential part of life as a Queen’s student when important private reading, engagement with e-learning resources, reflection on feedback to date and assignment research and preparation work is carried out.
    • Seminars/tutorials
      Significant amounts of teaching are carried out in small groups (typically 10-20 students). These provide an opportunity for students to engage with academic staff who have specialist knowledge of the topic, to ask questions of them and to assess their own progress and understanding with the support of peers. You should also expect to make presentations and other contributions to these groups.
    • Supervised projects
      In final year, you will be expected to carry out a significant piece of research on a topic or practical methodology that you have chosen. You will receive support from a supervisor who will guide you in terms of how to carry out your research and will provide feedback to you on at least 2 occasions during the write up stage.
    • Work placements
      Students may opt to undertake a vacation work-placement after Stage 2. This is a significant learning and employability enhancement opportunity and is accredited by the University.

    Assessment

    Details of assessments associated with this course are outlined below:

    • The way in which you are assessed will vary according to the Learning objectives of each module. Some modules are assessed solely through project work or written assignments. Others are assessed through a combination of coursework and end of semester examinations. Details of how each module is assessed are shown in the Student Handbook which is provided to all students during their first year induction.

    Feedback

    As students progress through their course at Queen’s they will receive general and specific feedback about their work from a variety of sources including lecturers, module co-ordinators, placement supervisors, personal tutors, advisers of study and peers. University students are expected to take a greater role in reflecting on this and taking the initiative in continuously improving the quality of their work. Feedback may be provided in a variety of forms including:

    • Feedback provided via formal written comments and marks relating to work that you, as an individual or as part of a group, have submitted.
    • Face to face comment. This may include occasions when you make use of the lecturers’ advertised “office hours” to help you to address a specific query.
    • Placement employer comments or references
    • Online or emailed comment.
    • General comments or question and answer opportunities at the end of a lecture, seminar or tutorial.
    • Pre-submission advice regarding the standards you should aim for and common pitfalls to avoid. In some instances, this may be provided in the form of model answers or exemplars which you can review in your own time.
    • Feedback and outcomes from practical classes.
    • Comment and guidance provided by staff from specialist support services such as, Careers, Employability and Skills or the Learning Development Service.
    • Once you have reviewed your feedback, you will be encouraged to identify and implement further improvements to the quality of your work.

    PREV
    Overview

  • Modules

    Modules

    The information below is intended as an example only, featuring module details for the current year of study. Modules are reviewed on an annual basis and may be subject to future changes – revised details will be published through Programme Specifications ahead of each academic year.

    • Year 1
      • Surveying and Measurement 1
        Overview

        This course is concerned with the understanding and application of basic surveying and measurement techniques and the use of total stations to carry out engineering works. The course covers:
        • Coordinate systems, maps and plans
        • Instrument errors
        • Linear measurement methods
        • Levelling techniques
        • Basic surveying techniques using theodolite
        • Open and closed traversing
        • Setting out of construction works
        • Surveying techniques using total station
        • Setting out and measurement of earthworks
        • Survey of existing structures
        • Setting out of circular, transition and vertical curves

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of the course you should be able to:
        • Understand how to read a basic plan
        • Understand the principles and applications of levels, theodolites and total stations
        • Have an appreciation of instrumental errors and how to account for these
        • Understand how to carry out control surveys and basic construction setting out
        On completion of the course you should be able to:
        • explain standard engineering surveying techniques
        • explain the principles and roles of errors and error control in surveying measurement; and
        • explain the appropriate surveying methods for: a) dimensional control of engineering works; b) topographic surveying

        Skills

        You should be able to:
        • Set up and use a level, a theodolite and a total station
        • Determine volumes associated with cuttings and embankments
        • Provide plan and elevation control of engineering works
        • Use surveying methods for: a) dimensional control of engineering works; b) topographic surveying
        The module will enhance the following skills:
        • Working within a team environment
        • Problem solving
        • The module will enhance the following skills:
        • Working within a team environment
        • Problem solving
        • Logical thinking

        Assessment

        Attendance at practical sessions and residential field camp..

        Coursework

        15%

        Written

        40%

        Practical

        45%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV1010

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Mathematics 1
        Overview

        Polynomials; the exponential and log functions and their rules; trigonometric functions; hyperbolic functions; non-linear functions; complex numbers; differentiation; derivatives in mathematical modelling; approximation; Taylor's series; minimisation; integration as the anti-derivative; techniques of integration; numerical integration; finding areas; finding moments; finding second moments of areas.
        Ordinary Differential Equations; Introduction to linear algebra: Matrices and Determinants; Vectors; Introduction to Statistics.

        Learning Outcomes

        • This course seeks to cover engineering mathematics topics that are deemed to be essential to a professional engineer.
        • This is an objective that is shared between both semesters, however the emphasis in the first semester being put on basic algebra, functions and calculus while on the second semester focuses on matrices, vectors, ordinary differential equations and statistics.
        • The emphasis of the course is to in still the basic knowledge of the topics outlined in the course contents as these have been deemed to be essential to a professional engineer. However, where ever possible, the course will develop an appreciation of the link between mathematics and physical processes.
        On completion of the course the student should have developed:
        • Their ability for logical thought.
        • Be able to express problems in an abstract way.
        • Take a problem from physical appreciation to a mathematical representation and through to design outcome.

        Skills

        • Each of the topics on the course have a specific purpose for the student’s role as an engineer and the core subject-specific skills gained by the student will be the ability to fulfil the engineering role intended in the course curriculum.
        • Throughout the course the student is expected to work on develop their numeracy and problem solving skills.
        The course will enhance the following skills:
        • All the topics in the course are intended to be used by the student in other courses and ultimately in their professional career.
        • Improve the student’s ability to solve problems concerning physical systems and engineering using mathematics.
        • Developed an appreciation of the link between mathematics and physical processes.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        30%

        Written

        70%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV1015

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Solids and Structures 1
        Overview

        The topics covered in this course will help students to understand and analyse the behaviour of some of the most common types of structures.
        The course covers: free body diagrams; equilibrium equations; statically determinate systems; method of joints and method of sections; concept of stress and strain; axial and shear force and bending moment diagrams; theory of bending and torsion; principle stresses; design of single reinforced RC beams, loading capacities of structural beams.

        Learning Outcomes

        • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the essential concepts, theories and principles underlying the mechanics of solid bodies and Euler–Bernoulli beam theory.
        • Understand the effect of cross sectional shape on the bending and torsional capacity of structural members.
        • Understand the different failure modes of under-reinforced and over-reinforced concrete beams.
        • Understand the elastic and plastic moment capacities of steel beams.
        • Idealize real world structures by making appropriate simplifying assumptions;
        • Apply elementary principles of mechanics to determine stresses and deformations arising in structures;

        Skills

        • Analyse and solve statically determinate structures
        • Draw axial force, shear force and bending moment diagrams of beams and frames
        • Design/analyse a steel/timber beam
        • Determine the area of steel in singly reinforced concrete beam sections
        • Determine principal stresses
        • Analyse torsional problems
        On completion of the course you should be able to:
        • Report results of an experimental investigation in a systematic manner and discuss practical implications of the findings.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        60%

        Written

        40%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV1017

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Construction Materials
        Overview

        This course introduces common materials used in the construction industry and soil behaviour. It deals with the constituents, manufacture, chemistry, properties and applications of these materials.
        The course also introduces the environmental impacts of construction materials through a discussion on the principles of green specification and the assessment of embodied energy and carbon footprint.
        The geotechnics part of this module begins with understanding Engineering Geology and subsequently progresses through some basic theories and geotechnical analysis.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of the course you should:
        a) be familiar with the common construction materials;
        b) have some knowledge of the use and limitations of the materials;
        c) understand the role of environmental impact assessment calculations and green specification in the selection of building materials for civil engineering structures;
        d) know how soils were formed, the identification of soils and rock minerals and their classification for engineering applications;
        e) be able to determine the existing stresses in the ground and any changes in them due to construction in short term and long term.
        On completion of the course you should:
        a) understand some common theories developed to allow realistic, safe use of various construction materials;
        b) understand the embodied energies in different materials and the environmental impact in manufacturing them;
        c) understand sustainability issues of materials during the whole life from extraction to application in construction to reuse/recycling at the end of life of the structure;
        d) have skills and abilities in understanding the basic characteristics of soils when they are used as construction material or construction on them;
        e) be able to relate the identification and classification of soils to “potential real behaviour of soils”.

        Skills

        On completion of the course you should be able to:
        a) discuss the major applications of common construction materials;
        b) identify the advantages and disadvantages of common construction materials;
        c) identify the ranges of the main properties of common construction materials;
        d) describe the implications of construction on ground and how they alter the stresses in the ground and therefore the potential consequences in qualitative manner;
        e) demonstrate the basis for effective selection of competing alternative materials using life cycle analysis and carbon footprint calculations of civil engineering works.
        The course will enhance the ability to:
        a) learn independently;
        b) work in groups in practical lab environments, including H&S awareness;
        c) demonstrate presentation and communication skills;
        d) undertake independent research;
        e) demonstrate awareness of resource efficiency and sustainability in construction practice.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        50%

        Written

        50%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV1018

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Hydraulics 1
        Overview

        The course introduces the application of fluid mechanics to the solution of civil engineering problems in hydrostatic and hydrodynamic situations, and build on this knowledge to cover the analysis and design of pipelines systems.
        Course content includes:
        Fluid properties; hydrostatics; variation of pressure vertically and horizontally in a fluid; manometers; types of flow; flow visualization; motion of a fluid particle; continuity equation; momentum equation; Bernoulli's equation; energy equation; behavior of real fluids. Laminar / Turbulent flow in pipes including friction and minor loss analysis. Pumps and pump characteristics. They should understand the operation of pumps and their efficiencies. Energy Line Diagrams, type of pipes, joints, cover and bedding.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of the course, apply fluid mechanics to basic civil engineering problems with an understanding of the mathematics necessary for the analysis of flow in pipes. Understand the various types of fluid flow that exist and the principles governing such flow including: the variations in pressures within a fluid, the application of momentum and energy equations and the continuity principle. • determine the flow state that exists for any given situation
        • apply basic theory to simple engineering problems;
        • calculate forces on submerged bodies;
        • apply momentum and energy equations to basic fluid flow problems.
        • understand why and where energy is lost in fluid flow
        • model and analyze single pipe systems.

        Skills

        • analyse simple problems in fluid mechanics by applying the fundamental concepts;
        • determine the magnitude and direction of forces on partially and fully submerged bodies;
        • determine the forces generated by changes in fluid momentum;
        • determine energy changes within a flowing fluid.
        • design simple pipeline systems
        • solve non-routine problems;
        • learn independently;
        • gather data from laboratory experiments;
        • solve some general problems through systematic analysis

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        50%

        Written

        50%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV1021

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Design and Communications 1
        Overview

        This module provides the students with an initial introduction to the design process as well as starts to build the communications skills necessary to communicate their work/ideas to others in the form of written reports and oral presentations. Engineering drawing as it pertains to both the creative process of design, and communicating the final design to others is given specific emphasis in the first semester. The second semester focuses more on the creative process of design and communicating the ideas developed. The importance of health and safety to the design process and to civil engineering more widely is addressed in the disasters and hazards group exercise in semester 2 project week.

        This module introduces the students to engineering drawing and the tools that can be used to produce various drawings. The course includes content on, sketching, hand drawing and CAD. The content is listed below
        For hand drawing: layout, title block, perspective drawing and projections. Particular emphasis is placed on developing the student skills in effectively communicating the 3D objects they are designing via drawings. For CAD drawing: layout, dimensions, structural joints, foundation details, column details, 3D drawing. For sketching: students are introduced to using one and two point perspective for sketching.

        In the second semester students are introduced to the design process; structural forms and structural idealisation; load paths; three-dimensional behaviour and general stability; behaviour of compression members; truss behaviour; truss connections; structural engineering in practice. In particular the students will design and build a timber footbridge and subsequently give a presentation on their project. In a separate exercise students are required to present their ideas/designs (to satisfy a given brief) via a written report

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of the course you should be able to have the knowledge and understanding of:
         how the general design process works.
         the practical considerations for design.
         the basic principles of structural design.
         The principles of engineering drawing.

        Successful completion of the course will lead to the following Knowledge and understanding of:
        • the basic principles of technical report writing
        • the key elements of oral presentations

        On completion of the course you should be able to:
        • Conceptualise engineering structures and convert them to hand/CAD drawing
        • Read CAD drawings

        On the completion of the course you should be able to:
        • Produce basic hand drawing with essential information such as dimensions and lettering
        • Produce basic conceptual view of engineering structure using recognised sketching techniques
        • Produce a detailed CAD drawing involving various aspects of engineering structure
        • Produce detailed CAD drawing from written instructions.


        On completion of the course you should be able to:
         appreciate the fundamental principle behind selected structures designs.
         demonstrate creative and innovative ability in design
         Communicate your designs/ideas via oral presentation and written report

        Skills

        On the completion of the course you should be able to:
        • Demonstrate competence in CAD drawing
        • Demonstrate competence in hand drawing

        On completion of the course you should be able to:
         construct different types of structural models
         recognise the effects of applied loading on different structural forms.
         understand the structural assembly process.
         draw the load paths for simple structures.
         ability to apply design principals to structural systems
         begin to have an understanding of the Health & Safety implications of engineering works
        The course will enhance the following skills:
        the ability to learn independently;
        the ability to apply knowledge to engineering design

        The course will enhance the following skills:
         design and construction skills developed from the assignments.
         group working through the practical assignments
         observe and investigate independently
         report writing and oral presentation

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV1022

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

    • Year 2
      • Geotechnics 2
        Overview

        The structure of the module is formulated based on assumption that the students have existing knowledge in the elements stipulated in “pre-requisite”. Strength, deformation and flow through soils are the three important components of Geotechnical Engineering and theoretical understanding and engineering applications of these aspects are carefully handled in this module. The course introduces the application of soil mechanics to the solution of civil engineering problems in soil characterisation, soil consolidation and groundwater flow, and to design methods for foundations.

        The course content includes:
        • hydraulic conductivity and the flow of water in soils;
        • seepage through simple earth structures;
        • compression of soils and soil stiffness parameters;
        • consolidation of soils;
        • soil failure criteria for both drained and undrained behaviour;
        • evaluation of geotechnical parameters and stress path testing;
        • the principles of design to Eurocode 7;
        • bearing capacity of shallow foundations;
        • bearing capacity of piled foundations; and
        • settlement of foundations.

        The course content includes:
        soil classification; the calculation of earth pressure distributions; the flow of water in soils; the design of simple shallow and deep foundations; the design of simple cantilever and gravity retaining walls; the calculation of shallow foundation settlement, both initial and long-term; one-dimensional consolidation of soils; three-dimensional consolidation of soils; behaviour of normally consolidated and over consolidated soils; the laboratory measurement of soil properties, including shear strength measurement; and stress path testing.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of the course you should be able to do a selection of the following:
        • outline the factors affecting soil hydraulic conductivity and seepage;
        • describe and analyse the compression behaviour of soils;
        • describe and analyse the consolidation behaviour of soils;
        • describe and analyse the shear strength behaviour of soils;
        • describe and analyse the behaviour of shallow foundations;
        • outline the theory and laboratory procedures for measuring soil shear strength properties; and
        • outline the theory and laboratory procedures for measuring soil settlement properties.
        On completion of the course you should be able to do a selection of the following:
        • demonstrate a critical appreciation of the rôle of uncertainty in geotechnics;
        • demonstrate a critical appreciation of the importance of factors of safety in geotechnics; and
        • demonstrate how observed soil behaviour fits within a model framework.

        Skills

        On completion of the course you will be able to:
        • consistently calculate vertical stress distributions;
        • determine the allowable load on a shallow foundation for undrained failure;
        • determine the allowable load on a shallow foundation for drained failure;
        • determine the allowable load on a piled foundation for undrained failure;
        • determine the allowable load on a piled foundation for drained failure;
        • determine the rate of water flow and the pore water pressure from a flow net; and
        • calculate the rate and magnitude of one-dimensional settlement for a consolidating soil.
        In addition, you should be able to do a selection of the following:
        • construct flownets to estimate seepage volumes and associated water pressures;
        • estimate bearing resistance of a foundation depending on soil type;
        • perform appropriate laboratory tests to determine the settlement characteristics of soils; and
        • perform appropriate laboratory tests to determine the shear strength characteristics of soils.
        The course will enhance the following skills:
        • the ability to learn independently;
        • the ability to gather data from laboratory experiments; and
        • the ability to solve non-routine problems through systematic analysis.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        30%

        Written

        60%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV2017

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Hydraulics 2
        Overview

        Open Channel Free surface flow (types of flow, Manning and Chezy equations, design of sections). Design of water supply pipelines, pipes in parallel and the analysis of pipe networks. Measurement of fluid flow in pipes and channels.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of the course, apply fluid mechanics to basic civil engineering problems with an understanding of the mathematics necessary for the analysis of flow in pipe networks and channels. Understand the various types of fluid flow that exist and the principles governing such flow.
        They should be familiar with methods of calculation demands and loadings on pipelines and networks. They should understand the principles of pipe network analysis and sewerage design as well as the practical considerations that must be taken into account in the detailing of sewers and water mains.
        You will be able to:
        * determine the flow state that will exist for any given situation and the magnitude of that flow
        * model and analyse single, parallel and network pipe systems
        * understand where and why energy is lost in fluid flow
        * determine the loss in energy that will occur within any system
        * understand the difference between closed conduit and open surface flow.
        * determine the flow that will occur in an open channel system

        Skills

        .Students completing the module should be able to apply the principles of flow in closed conduits and open channels to the analysis of such systems. Use these principles for basic design purposes. Differentiate between states of flow. Conduct prescribed laboratory experiments and draw conclusions from the results obtained. Calculate the nodal demands placed on pipe networks. They should be able to calculate the flows and pressures in such networks. They should be able to design and detail basic sewerage systems.
        The course will enhance the following skills:
        * develop solutions for basic hydraulic engineering
        * work as part of a team
        * Laboratory skill, data presentation
        * Manipulate data to provide clearer understanding of a concept.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        20%

        Written

        60%

        Practical

        20%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV2018

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Structural Mechanics
        Overview

        This Module covers theoretical mechanics and its application within element sizing (steel and reinforced concrete). Topics include:
        • shear stress; bending and twisting of thin-walled open sections and closed sections; and strut buckling – in relation to theoretical mechanics;
        • introduction to element design in Reinforced Concrete, e.g calculating (and designing for) bending and shear capacity of reinforced concrete beams;
        • introduction to element design in Structural steel, e.g. Bending capacity of Universal Beams and axial capacity of Universal Columns.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of the course students should know and understand:
        • elastic behaviour of members subject to shear and torsion loads;
        • elastic Eulers behaviour of columns and its impact on design; and
        • how the principles are applied in determining the size and shape of structural elements.

        On successful completion of the course students should be able to:
        • determine the shear stress and angle of twist in due to torsional loading and determine the shear stress distribution in beams of different cross-sections subject to transverse loading;
        • assess the buckling loads for columns and recognise when buckling stability of structures may arise;
        • recognise modes of failure of structural elements and calculate the size of structural member necessary to support a given load;
        • recognise the connection between the sustainability agenda and the design issues covered;
        • design members in structural steel for tension, compression or bending and design simple bolted/welded connections;
        • design members in reinforced concrete for compression and bending.

        Skills

        On completion of the course you should be able to:
        • identify various modes of failure of columns depending on their support conditions;
        • describe the behaviour of reinforced concrete sections in bending and shear;
        • critically analyse failure modes of structural elements and the connections in structural steelwork.
        • identify the shear flow in closed and open sections and the distribution of shear stress in each case.

        The course will enhance the following skills:
        • ability to report results of an experimental investigation in a systematic manner and validate theoretical approaches;
        • ability to learn independently;
        • ability to solve structural analysis problems using hand calculations and computer software.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        20%

        Written

        70%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV2062

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Design and Communications 2
        Overview

        The content of this module focuses on developing students Communication skills (mainly Semester 1) and also on developing their skills in Engineering design (mainly semester 2).

        On the communication side the module focuses on developing student’s communications skills, in particular the development of professional communication skills necessary for a career in the Civil Engineering profession. The course content includes: personal transferable skills for job applications, e.g. drafting effective CVs, letters of application, and Interview skills. The role of the professional institutions and chartership for career progression is also introduced to students. Students are introduced to the principles of technical report writing. Similarly guidance on effective oral presentations is provided. The role of Ethics, Entrepreneurship and Sustainability in Civil Engineering are. The module includes a major 4 day group role playing exercise (Mock Public Enquiry or Disasters and Hazards Exercise).

        In Semester 2 the module introduces students to preliminary and detailed design of engineering solutions with a significant structural component. This is achieved through 2 assignments.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of the module participants should also be able to recognise the importance of effective communication skills in Civil Engineering. More precisely they should be able to recognise the benefits of effective communication skills in both job applications (drafting CVs & letters of application, interviews, online/telephone interviews) and in professional practice (oral presentations, written reports). Participants should be able to recognise the importance of Civil Engineering to society and the ethical responsibilities required by the profession.

        Students should also know and understand the processes involved in engineering design; in particular understand the distinction between preliminary and detailed design and know that design is an iterative, rather than linear, process.


        On completion of the module students should be able to recognise criteria required by employers in job advertisements and identify transferable skills that may be relevant, develop suitable interview strategies for job applications, understand the importance of focused oral presentations, outline the importance of the role played by Ethics, Sustainability and Entrepreneurship in Civil Engineering, demonstrate the importance of dealing with the public and listening/negotiating with stake holders; this includes recognising relevant stake holders from wider society that may be implicated/impacted by Civil Engineering developments


        Students should also be able to formulate a design sequence to reach a solution; propose a viable solution and carry out calculations to determine the size of structural elements.

        Skills

        On completion of the course, participants should be able to:
        Draft effective CVs and letters of application/application forms, develop appropriate interview strategies, give clear and focused oral presentations, source data and summarise it effectively in written form and effective use of graphics, cite information sources in a recognised manner and to avoid potential plagiarism issues. Apply professional standards to Civil Engineering practice.

        On completion of the module students should also be able to assimilate the information provided (for their design projects); recognise the critical aspects/features of the design problem; propose a preliminary solution and calculate sizes for a viable solution.

        The course will enhance the following skills:
        The ability to work independently and to summarise information from multiple sources, to source information from diverse sources, to organise and work collectively in a group; to effectively summarise information and present it in a concise manner in written form, or orally,

        On the design side this module will enhance the following skills: (i) the ability to work in a team; (ii) the ability to break down the work into clear tasks; (iii) the ability to present calculations and drawings in a clear and tidy manner.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV2064

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Mathematics and Coding 2
        Overview

        Systems of linear equations. The eigenvalue problem and modelling dynamic systems. Application of matrices to engineering. Partial derivatives and the solution of partial differential equations. Applied statistics. The Matlab environment, Data types and variable storage, Selection Statements Loop statements, Functions, File input and output, Using graphics, Model Building and regression, Modelling the shallow wave.

        Learning Outcomes

        • Learn how to deal with large systems of equations for which there are both unique and infinite solutions.
        • Learn how modelling with partial derivatives, combined with a finite difference approach, allows a three dimensional world which is changing with time to be modelled.
        • Expand statistics from a means of summarizing data to one of inference, allowing decisions to be made in the face of uncertainty.
        • Write proficient software.
        • Able to use the software skills to solve engineering problems.

        • Increase the student’s ability for logical thought.
        • Be able to express problems in an abstract way.
        • Reduce the student’s reliance on actual numbers and make them more confidence working with symbols.
        • Students should be starting to model complex engineering phenomena.
        • Understand the difference between good and bad software.
        • Be able to breakdown a problem in to steps which can be easily programed.

        Skills

        • Throughout the course the student is expected to work on developing their numeracy skills.
        • Improve their problem solving skills.
        • Learn to work with large systems of data.
        • Learn how to computer program.
        • Be able to solve engineering problems by coding them and displaying the results in a meaningful matter.
        • All the topics in the course are intended to be used by in other courses and ultimately in student’s professional career.
        • Improve the student’s ability to solve engineering problems using mathematics and coding.
        • Improve their skills with spreadsheets.
        • Enhance logical thinking.
        • Write computer codes which could aid to the analysis and modelling of a vast range of problems.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        40%

        Written

        60%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV2065

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Infrastructure Site Characterisation
        Overview

        Concepts and theories behind site characterisation and engineering geology are combined in this module with reference to the development and maintenance of major pieces of civil engineering infrastructure. The module will contain various aspects of transport planning and environmental impact assessment, which include: the Strategic Environmental Assessment and Environmental Impact Assessment policy contexts, transport policy, highways design principles for route selection, and stakeholder analysis. There will be an introduction to Multi-Criteria Analysis as a general decision making approach to engineering design. The engineering geology will contain: weathering, glacial/post/fluvial glacial processes, rock deformation, rock strength, bedrock and drift geological maps, geological maps and topography, groundwater control in civil engineering applications, and geological conditions affecting slope stability.

        Learning Outcomes

        You should develop an understanding of the essential design and construction process of highways and highway structures while giving consideration to Geological background d of the location where appropriate. On the completion of the course you should have understanding of:

        • Policy context for infrastructure decision making.
        • Understanding of stakeholder analysis in infrastructure.
        • Introduction to Multi-Criteria Analysis for decision making.
        • Integrating geological data into engineering design for safe and economical design
        • Surface and subsurface natural processes affecting rock and subsoil properties on geological and human timescales
        • Identifying geological hazards that may affect Engineering works and analyse how these may impact on engineering design.
        • Awareness of the environmental, social, and economic factors affecting design and an awareness of how they are assessed.
        • Awareness of the policy context for Strategic Environmental Assessment, Environmental Impact Asessment, and transport policy.


        On the completion of the course you should be able to:
        • Characterise site impacts of transport infrastructure alternatives.
        • Compare proposed transport infrastructure alternatives with the "do-nothing" approach and make recommendations.
        • Examine and critically evaluate geological information from diverse backgrounds.
        • Apply scientific first principles to make informed judgements based on incomplete information
        • Specify critical geological and environmental issues and how they influence engineering design /hazard assessment.
        • Synthesis / integrate geological data into wider engineering design.

        Skills

        • Understand the basis for route selection using the UK Design Manual for Roads and Bridges.
        • Demonstrate an understanding of the process for developing an Environmental Impact Assessment for infrastructure works.
        • Demonstrate an understanding of the different roles within a multidisciplinary environmental impact assessment team.
        • Understand the importance of geology and geological conditions for society.
        • Identify critical parameters that influence rock and subsoil strength.
        • Appreciate strengths and weaknesses of diverse geoligcal data sources.
        • Specify geological data requirements.
        • Define techniques for collecting geological data, including appraisal of strengths and weaknesses of various approaches.
        • Incorporate geological data into wider Engineering issues.
        • Integrate relevant geological issues into Engineering design.
        • Sourcing critical datasets.
        • Appreciation of relevance of studies from diverse backgrounds.
        • Critical appraisal of relevance and quality of information from diverse sources.
        • Integrating multidisciplinary data.
        • Synthesis of information based on partial/incomplete information using scientific and mathematical principles.
        • Apply outcomes of multidisciplinary studies to conceive original designs
        • Enhance team working skills.
        • Embed sustainable 'thinking' skills
        • Develop solutions from initial ideas.
        • Problem solving, independent learning
        • Developing the principles of systematic design and analysis

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        60%

        Written

        40%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV2066

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

    • Year 3
      • Design and Communications 3
        Overview

        This module requires two design assignments to be undertaken, each in a major area of civil, structural and environmental engineering. The design exercises offered vary from year to year, but will typical include exercises in:
        • Geotechnics, which might include bridge foundations, building foundations, retaining structures, embankments, seepage control, and basements;
        • Hydraulics, which might include storm drainage networks, industrial pipe systems, flood relief, and flood measurement structures;
        • Structures, which might include single and multi-storey buildings, road and canal bridges, and footbridges; and
        • Environmental, which might include, land & groundwater contamination, site investigation, conceptual model development, identification of pollutant linkages, remediation options appraisal using sustainability metrics, design of a remediation strategy.

        The studio element of the module requires group work. An options appraisal presentation will be given by week five by each group as an overview of their project to enable peer feedback.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate the ability to assess:
        • the general processes involved in civil engineering design;
        • the difference between the preliminary and detail stages within the overall design process;
        • the importance of task prioritisation;
        • the need for careful time management; and
        • the value of effective team working.

        On successful completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate the ability to assess:
        • accept a design brief and formulate a design sequence to reach a solution;
        • understand that distinct and viable design options are possible;
        • demonstrate the basis on which one design option is chosen for detailed design; and
        • explain the difference between the conceptual and final stages in the design process.

        Skills

        On completion of the design exercises you should be able to:
        • interpret the information contained in a client’s brief;
        • recognise critical or core design requirements which are stated or implied within the brief;
        • propose different design solutions which are distinct and viable;
        • calculate sizes of primary and secondary engineering elements;
        • make effective use of design aids and the appropriate codes of practice; and
        • describe the process of writing and compiling design reports.

        This course will enhance the following skills:
        • the ability to work in a team;
        • the ability to undertake routine and non-routine design tasks;
        • the ability to gather technical and appropriate trade information from a variety of sources;
        • the ability to set out well defined tasks and targets;
        • preparation and delivery of group multi-media presentations; and
        • ability to explain and defend design proposals in question and answer sessions.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV3007

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Project 3
        Overview

        Students are required to undertake either an individual or joint project on a selected subject related to the civil engineering industry.

        Learning Outcomes

        To develop the student's ability to investigate an unfamiliar subject area and to produce a clear, concise report of the investigation.
        On completion you will be able to:
        a) acquire knowledge of relevant research in a well defined area, b) engage with various engineering and other assumptions, approaches and practical issues, c) perform relevant analysis and directly relate such results and insights to the aim of the research project.
        On completion you will be able to:
        a) formulate a research proposal that is consistent with honours level student research, b) involved when completing a research project, c) identify and carry out the key links in developing, designing, undertaking and completing a research project, d) develop and enhance report writing and time management skills.

        Skills

        Practical skills: study independently; plan and manage a task; tackle an unfamiliar problem; gather information from a variety of sources; perform experimental work competently; make effective use of IT facilities; produce a well written substantial report; explain and discuss work with others. Knowledge and understanding of the principles of gathering information on a topic and evaluating its significance.
        On completion of the course you will be able to:
        1. Use of library and other information sources.
        2. Time management, work scheduling and project management,
        3. Laboratory skills including handling different instruments
        4. Data analysis and computer skills.
        Learning hazard, risk and safe working practices.

        Assessment

        To carry out a project under the direction of a supervisor and to submit a report detailing the findings.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV3006

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Hydraulics 3
        Overview

        Hydraulic considerations of dam design; spillways and energy dissipation; storage effects and flood routing in reservoirs; storm sewerage. Flood prediction using the Flood Estimation Handbook. Water quality, water treatment techniques (clarification, filtration, disinfection etc.), waste water treatment (preliminary, primary, secondary and tertiary processes), sludge treatment, disposal of waste water and sludge, environmental impacts, construction and operational issues and health and safety.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of the course you should have an understanding of:
        • practical methods of flow prediction;
        • water resource assessment;
        • the design of storm sewers
        • the need for water and waste water treatment;
        • the range of contaminants which affect water quality;
        • the main treatment methods in use at present for potable water;
        • primary, secondary & tertiary treatment of wastewater;
        • the main health & safety issues concerning water/wastewater treatment;
        • basic aspects of legislation concerning water & wastewater treatment in this country;
        • factors affecting the design, construction and operation treatment plant;
        • methods of disposal of effluent & sludge.

        On completion of the course you should be able to:
        • select and apply a wide range of mathematical/analytical methods to solve a range of hydraulic & water quality problems
        • use taught scientific principles in solving unfamiliar engineering problems
        • relate the relevant engineering principles to the practical aspects of design/operation of hydraulic plant.

        Skills

        On completion of the course you should be able to:
        • calculate the yield/storage relationship for a dam;
        • route flood flows;
        • predict flood flow;
        • design a simple storm sewer system & calculate the capacity of storm water systems for wastewater treatment plant;
        • assess the settlement of suspended solids;
        • calculate the size requirements for settlement tanks and grit chambers;
        • carry out calculations relating to the operation & backwash of granular media filters;
        • calculate the dilution of discharged effluent etc.

        The course will enhance the following skills
        • learn independently;
        • solve non routine problems;
        • develop solutions from an initial idea.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        20%

        Written

        80%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV3063

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Structures 3
        Overview

        This course introduces more advanced topics in structural analysis and design, including matrix stiffness analysis of statically determinant and inderterminate structures; plastic analysis of continuous beams, frames and slabs; advanced buckling analysis and design fundamentals of steel members; and some design aspects of typical buildings.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of the course you should know and understand:
        • the difference between statically determinate and indeterminate structures;
        • matrix analysis method of different one and two-dimensional structures with differet loading and boundary conditions;
        • how the introduction of hinges to change continuous beams and frames from statically indeterminate to determinate;
        • how to perform plastic analysis of steel beams and frames and RC slabs;
        • essential design aspects of multistorey steel frame buildings and the construction of basic BIM models,

        On completion of the course you should be able to explain:
        • the fundamental behaviour of statically determinate and indeterminate structures;
        • the principles of matrix analysis of structures;
        • the basis of plastic analysis of continuous beams, frames and slabs;
        • the basis of column buckling design curves, steel section classification and lateral torsional buckling of beams;
        • loading paths and design priciples of multistorey steel buildings.

        Skills

        On completion of the course you should be able to:
        • perform the stiffness method of analysis through application of boundary conditions, application of external loading and solving the stiffness matrix problem;
        • determine the plastic collapse mechanisms and perform plastic analysis of the plastic analysis of beams, frames and slabs;
        • determine the flexural buckling, distorsional & local buckling loads of steel columns and lateral torsional & local buckling of steel;
        • produce the basic design of multistorey steel buildings;
        • develop basic BIM models.
        The course will enhance the following skills:
        • the ability to solve routine and non-routine problems;
        • the ability to apply design principles to structural examples;
        • the ability to learn independently;
        • the ability to trace the load path through different structures;
        • the ability to use structural analysis and BIM software;

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        20%

        Written

        80%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV3064

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Project Management and Engineering Data
        Overview

        This course aims to introduce the student to management aspects of discrete projects and of the construction process as a whole. It facilitates a general appreciation of the various problems encountered in managing construction contracts and the skills and techniques required to tackle such problems. The module also develops the understanding of statistical modelling methods used in the collection and interpretation of data in engineering projects.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of the module you should know and understand:
        • the construction process and the various phases through which construction projects go;
        • the principles of engineering economy;
        • financial aspects of the construction process;
        • contract planning and control;
        • contract law and ICE conditions of contract;
        • the basis of response surface methods;
        • the application of optimisation techniques to engineering problems;
        • the design of experiments;
        • approaches to the analysis of experimental data.

        On completion of the module you should:
        • understand the construction process, life cycle and the various phases through which construction projects go;
        • understand the financial aspects of the construction process;
        • understand and apply contract planning and control methods;
        • appreciate the legal and contractual aspects relevant to construction projects;
        • be able to demonstrate insight in to tackling research problems using statistical techniques;
        • appreciate the quality issues associated with data handling; and
        • be able to critically reflect on the monitoring and management processes associated with a significant engineering project.

        Skills

        On completion of the module you should be able to:
        • view the planning and progress of construction projects logically and systematically;
        • apply project planning and scheduling techniques;
        • apply cost management techniques;
        • explain the salient features of contract law and ICE form of contract;
        • use standard statistical techniques for data collection, analysis and presentation;
        • use partial differential calculus for response surface modelling of engineering data;
        • use a range of optimisation techniques to aid decision making; and
        • Implement data modelling and optimisation techniques in numerical computing software.

        This module will enhance the following skills:
        • the ability to solve civil engineering management problems through mathematical analysis;
        • the ability to critically investigate the rôle of data in construction and project management;
        • the reflective evaluation of work in which the student was involved;
        • the solution of non-routine problems;
        • the development of solutions from an initial idea;
        • the solution of some project management problems through systematic analysis; and
        • the ability to learn independently.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        20%

        Written

        80%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV3066

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Geotechnics 3
        Overview

        This module builds upon Geotechnics 2 to deal with further practical applications of Geotechnics. It deals with site assessment and characterisation from a combined geotechnical / geo-environmental perspective. The course also addresses the design of simple cantilever and gravity retaining walls, ground improvement and practical work with computerised applications related to problems of seepage and slope stability.

        The course includes the following topics:
        desk studies; site conceptual modelling; environmental & engineering geophysics; boreholes & sampling; sampling disturbance; in-situ testing; design parameters from site investigation; environmental impact assessments; use of geosynthetics, ground improvement techniques, slope stability, retaining wall design.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of the course you should have knowledge and understanding of:
        the environmental, social and economic factors affecting design and an awareness of how they are assessed;
        the process of site characterisation, from preliminary conceptual design to evaluation of data and extraction of parameters for design;
        the techniques and tools used in practice for investigating sites, their advantages and limitations;
        how to design simple retaining walls;
        a range of different ground improvement techniques;
        applying computer packages to problems of seepage and slope stability.

        On completion of the course you should be able to:
        define, apply and formulate conceptual models;
        be familiar with site investigation practice;
        recognise the advantages and limitations of different site investigation techniques
        interpret data from a range of site investigation techniques;
        determine the stability of retaining walls;
        deal with problems and remediation of slopes instability;
        recognise the use of geotextiles in Civil Engineering and design retaining walls.

        Skills

        On completion of the course you should be able to:
        understand the process in developing Environmental Impact Assessments;
        design and plan a site investigation;
        select appropriate site investigation techniques for a range of possible situations;
        extract design parameters from site investigation data;
        design a gravity wall and a sheet pile wall according to given criteria;
        design for slope instability;
        carry out design with geosynthetics;
        use a geotechnical computer design package.
        The course will enhance the following skills:
        the ability to deal with complex information;
        the ability to solve non-routine problems;
        the ability to both learn independently and to work within a team;
        the ability to develop solutions from initial ideas.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        20%

        Written

        70%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV3065

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

    • Year 4
      • Civil Engineering Placement
        Overview

        The workplace portfolio should contain:
        Executive Summary of placement, which must provide an accurate representation of the placement experience.
        Background to the placement experience, which should provide a clear articulation of the motivation for undertaking the placement.
        Information about the Placement Organisation, which should demonstrate a sound understanding of the company.
        Discussion of the Main Outcomes, which should provide a clear evaluation of the outcomes from the placement.

        Conclusion, Discussion of the question, “Are you more employable since completing the placement?”

        Monthly Diaries
        The portfolio should also contain a minimum of 9 Monthly diaries, each signed off by the work supervisor. These diaries should contain descriptions of the tasks undertaken and the responsibilities the student has been given. They should demonstrate the work undertaken and the skill developed by undertaking the tasks. Personal skill development should also be included along with action points and objective for the coming month.

        The portfolio should also contain all material developed prior to the placement taking place (CV, interview skill and application form exercises, risk analysis, safety documentation etc.)

        Learning Outcomes

        Attain knowledge to comply with the level K attributes of ICE IPD

        Skills

        The ability to:
        Communicate with other at all levels of the civil engineering industry
        Discuss ideas and plans competently
        Develop effective personal and social skills.

        Assessment

        Placement review interview
        Submission of work place portfolio by end of July in the year after placement begins.
        Presentation of work place experience during July in the year after placement begins.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        4

        Credits

        120

        Module Code

        CIV3999

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

    • Year 5
      • Design and Communication 4
        Overview

        There are various design themes on offer which will vary from year to year. Each student will complete some element of the design in the in the first semester and the remainder in the second. In the initial period of each design the students are expected to fully define the design brief after some background research and carry out an options appraisal on their designs.. The precise end point in the exercises is also student defined but must meet the general criteria set down in the outline design brief. Consequently the students are responsible for their own time management in consultation with the design staff. The precise detail and format of the final reports and presentations is also largely at the discretion of the students with the staff closely monitoring and assisting where necessary to ensure that adequate standards are reached. The allocation of tasks within each exercise is heavily influenced by the aspirations of each student. However, this is carefully supervised to ensure that every student is forced to explore new areas to maximise the design experience and thus broaden their knowledge base.

        Each theme is subdivided so that every student experiences working in a large group, in a small group and individually. This is organised so that the final mark allocation is split between individual assessment and group contribution with more emphasis on group work at the start of the course and individual design predominating at the end. Consequently the whole group is responsible for the overall design report in each theme backed by small group and individual contributions on detailed design elements. A range of design exercises are undertaken including project planning, outline feasibility studies and detailed design from client's brief to outline costing. This is complemented by training in communication skills which includes confident public speaking, quality presentation, technical report writing, negotiation skills and interview procedures.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of this course the student should have consolidated knowledge and understanding gained in the main disciplines of engineering during previous years by application to multidisciplinary design problems.
        Appreciate the social, environmental ethical, economic and commercial consequences of exercising engineering judgement used to obtain design solutions.

        Application of appropriate engineering design tools to support design solutions.
        The ability to comprehend the ‘broad picture’ in the design exercise.
        Demonstration of creative and innovative skills.

        Skills

        The ability to devise practical design solutions to complex multi-disciplinary design problems.
        Ability to present often complex information both orally and in written report format
        Confident public speaking
        Informative presentations
        Ability to sift large amounts of information and present the key points
        To work constructively as a team member

        Assessment

        Attendance at all the final design presentations in both semesters
        Written contribution to group design reports with contribution clearly identified
        Participation in the final group oral presentations
        Attendance at weekly group management meetings

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        5

        Credits

        40

        Module Code

        CIV4012

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        Yes

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Construction and Business Management
        Overview

        The module aims to enhance the students' awareness of developments in the field of construction management with emphasis on projects’ sustainability appraisal, life cycle costing, multi-criteria value analysis and management, project performance evaluation methods, Health &Safety regulations and construction equipment management. Then, in relation to general business management, enhance the students’ awareness of Entrepreneurship, business accounting procedures (balance sheets and profit and loss accounts), aspects of employment law.

        Learning Outcomes

        • Management of project interactions with is economic, social and natural environment
        • Life-cycle costing and value management
        • Cost-Benefit Analysis
        • Investment appraisal
        • Project progress and performance evaluation methods
        • Construction equipment uses, productivity and management
        • An overview of the CDM Regulations – how they have developed over time and their impact on project risk reduction and management
        • Entrepreneurship
        • Various aspects of financial management in construction companies and engineering work
        • Human resource management aspects in organisations including leadership, personnel management, and recruitment.

        • Ability to analyse and apply methods and decision making techniques to appraise projects’ lifecycle costs, value, benefits, sustainability and financial viability
        • Ability to apply methods for project cost and time performance evaluation and monitoring
        • Ability to solve problems in construction equipment management and fleet cost optimisation
        • Develop an understanding of the entrepreneurial aspects of the business process
        • Understand how company accounts are presented
        • Have an awareness of the financial health and status of companies through their published accounts
        • Develop an understanding of the statutory and legal aspects of the human resource recruitment and management

        Skills

        On completion of the course, students will have a broad understanding of construction management aspects mainly related with cost, value, economic and financial sustainability, performance, health and safety and equipment management. They will have developed an awareness of the various functions that a construction project manager performs. Have an ability to read and understand information pertaining to company finances - including balance sheets and profit and loss accounts. Know how to become involved in recruitment processes and general human resource management. Know how to pursue entrepreneurial ideas.
        • solve project management problems through relevant analysis and calculation methods
        • solve construction equipment management problems through relevant analysis and calculation methods
        • develop entrepreneurial ideas
        • work within teams
        • develop solutions for financial/commercial management
        • develop solutions for human resource management
        • learn independently

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        20%

        Written

        80%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        5

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV4035

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Advanced Engineering Science
        Overview

        This course will extend the study of hydraulics and geotechnics within an environmental and civil engineering context. Topic covered will include: Navier Stokes equations, Power generation from water and wind, water waves (shoaling, reflection, diffraction), pressure transients in pipe flows, vortex motion in fluids, pumps and turbines, mathematical modelling. Coastal processes, shear strength and compression of soils operating within a single framework, elastic model analysis, elasto-plastic model analysis, plastic model (upper bound and lower bound), compacted soils. The contaminant transport of solute through geo materials.
        On completion of the course you should be able to:
        • study fluid mechanics topics independently; perform calculations in advanced fluid mechanics subjects; develop design solutions for renewable energy systems;
        • use of mathematics to quantify wave processes and tidal flows
        • demonstrate a critical appreciation of current stress state of the ground when compared to the previous stress history when choosing the predictive models.
        • demonstrate a critical appreciation of anisotropy when predicting strains and stresses and understanding the limitation of some of the constitutive models.
        • demonstrate a critical appreciation of complex structure that compacted fills may have in understanding the volumetric response upon saturation.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of the course you should be able to do a selection of the following:

        On completion of the course you should:
        • have an understanding of the equations of fluid motion (N-S equations);
        • have a knowledge of advanced subjects in fluid mechanics and geotechnics;
        • understand the techniques used to design surge protection;
        • understand the analysis of flow over a mobile bed;
        • have a basic understanding of the need for and application of numerical models for fluid flow, include wave theory and modelling;
        • have a basic understanding of coastal processes;
        • Understand the difference between the elastic, elasto-plastic and plastic models in geotechnics.
        • Describe and analyse elastic behaviour and the impact of anisotropy on the prediction of strains and stresses in soils
        • Describe and analyse the behaviour of compacted soils and the impact of environmental changes
        • Describe and analyse contaminant transport through geo material.
        On completion of the course you should be able to:
        • study fluid mechanics topics independently; perform calculations in advanced fluid mechanics subjects; develop design solutions for renewable energy systems;
        • use of mathematics to quantify wave processes and tidal flows
        • demonstrate a critical appreciation of current stress state of the ground when compared to the previous stress history when choosing the predictive models.
        • demonstrate a critical appreciation of anisotropy when predicting strains and stresses and understanding the limitation of some of the constitutive models.
        • demonstrate a critical appreciation of complex structure that compacted fills may have in understanding the volumetric response upon saturation.

        Skills

        On completion of the course you should be able to:
        • solve problems of fluid flow based on the N-S equations;
        • estimate pressure variations in a pipeline due to changes in flow rate; use dimensional considerations to study fluid flows; determine pressure and velocity variations in flows with appreciable curvature; design renewable energy systems
        • understand the theory used to describe coastal processes;
        • Derive elastic formulations for shear strain and volumetric strain predictions.
        • Determine insitu stresses using anisotropic and isotropic elastic theories.
        • Determine the constitutive parameters from raw laboratory data
        • Determine plastic and elastic strains upon loading normally consolidated clays.
        • Determine collapse and swelling settlement of compacted fills.
        • Determine upper bound solutions for excavations. Slopes etc.
        • Control the spread of contaminants
        The course will enhance the following skills:
        • ability to learn independently; ability to solve non-routine problems;
        • ability to problem solve and develop solutions from an initial idea; ability to present complex information in a structured manner;
        • the ability to solve non-routine problems through systematic analysis.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        20%

        Written

        80%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        5

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV4036

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Bridge and Structural Eng
        Overview

        History & development of materials, Bridge types, Bridge loading, Analysis methods (stiffness matrix, grillage, compressive membrane action), Applications of pre-stressed concrete beams, , Arch bridges, Bridge monitoring and assessment, Bridge strengthening and FRP;
        Elastic Continua: Plate bending, Finite element method, Finite element modelling, Finite elements: Isoparametric elements and plate bending, Dynamics of structures, Seismic engineering

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of this module you will be able to:
        • Outline the historical development of materials and bridge engineering
        • Identify and describe the different structural forms of bridges Describe the methods available to assess and strengthen bridges/structures
        • Formulate the governing equations for plate bending
        • Use the finite element method of analysis
        • Explain simple dynamics of structures and seismic engineering principles
        On completion of this module you will be able to:
        • Choose appropriate computer models and analysis methods for structural behaviour
        • Describe structural health monitoring techniques for new and existing bridge structures
        • Derive the equations relating to plates subject to lateral loads
        • Derive dynamic characteristics of simple lumped-mass systems

        Skills

        On completion of this module you will be able to:
        • Carry out structural and computer analyses e.g. stiffness matrix, grillage, prestress, compressive membrane action, finite element analysis Have an appreciation for bridge materials, bridges types/form and the load path
        • Assess the strength of an existing bridge structure and suggest methods for strengthening
        • Analyse and thereby design complex structures
        • Evaluate the dynamic characteristics of simple structures and analyse structural responses under seismic loading
        The module will enhance your ability to:
        • Learn and carry out analysis independently
        • Solve routine and non-routine problems through systematic analysis and various analytical tools, including computer analysis
        • Model engineering systems mathematically
        • Apply appropriate communication skills in a group setting

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        20%

        Written

        80%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        5

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV4037

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Eng Hydrology and Hydrogeology
        Overview

        The course introduces hydrological cycle and its application in engineering. The course covers aspects of surface and sub surface hydrology, and focuses on the engineering context of the topic.
        The course content includes:
        The hydrological cycle; meteorological data; components of hydrographs and influences on their shape; baseflow separation and hydrograph analysis; derived and synthetic unit hydrographs, flood forecasting using frequency analysis; synthetic data generation; abstraction from, and augmentation of, river flows; flow duration curves; risk assessment; flow analysis. Hydrometry, quantification of groundwater through flow balances, direct and indirect recharge mechanisms, fluid flow in vadose zone, solute transport in the vadose zone, darcy’s law, laboratory based permeability measurements, groundwater flow in fractured media, averaged hydraulic conductivity and transmissivity, groundwater level fluctuations effective porosity and advective velocity calculations, advection and dispersion in contaminant transport, classification of groundwater bodies, geological influences on groundwater flow, flow in heterogeneous and anisotropic media, flow nets vertical and lateral hydraulic gradient calculations, 1D modelling groundwater flow in confined and unconfined systems, radial flow in confined and unconfined systems under steady-state and unsteady state conditions, well efficiency.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of the module you should:
        be familiar with methods of collecting and interpreting hydrological data; you should know the techniques used to analyse flood hydrographs; you should understand frequency analysis of hydrological events and have a working knowledge of methods of hydrological forecasting; recognition of the key concepts related to groundwater flow, groundwater management and the role of groundwater in the influencing processes in the wider environment.
        The module is aimed at developing practical skills in integrating key hydraulic and geological concepts and techniques to address realistic issues currently faced by practicing Environmental Engineers. This will require employment of a range of methods conventionally used in hydrology, geology, soil mechanics and hydraulics to develop a coherent understanding of how groundwater behaves in the wider environment and how it impacts both natural processes (e.g. river flow) and human activity (e.g. excavation, water supply, contaminant transport).
        On completion of the course you should be able to:
        • Interpret hydrological data and estimate the exceedance or non exceedance probability of a river flow event; interpret flow rating and flow duration curves; estimate flood volumes in gauged catchments subject to rainfall; undertake a risk analysis.
        • Conceptualise groundwater flow mechanisms, quantify the significance of groundwater on a catchment scale, quantify hydraulic conductivity using multi-scale methods, employ geological, hydrological, hydraulic and water quality data to develop coherent models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport processes in a range of hydrogeological settings, evaluate the potential of heterogeneity and anisotropy influence groundwater conditions, recognise the potential implications of particular geological conditions on hydrogeological regimes

        Skills

        On completion of the course you should be able to:
        Undertake a frequency analysis of hydrological events; use appropriate methodologies to derive design data; calculate the effects of abstractions from rivers; evaluate consents for discharges to rivers. Quantify the groundwater component in flow balances using hydrological data, determine the potential of particular rock and soil types to be hydrogeologically productive, or otherwise, employ hydraulic head data to quantify groundwater flow rates and directions, integrate geological and hydrogeological data to develop conceptual models of groundwater flow, develop mathematical (numerical and analytical) models of groundwater flow, analyse pumping test data to determine transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity and, where relevant storage (specific storage and specific yield)
        The module is aimed to enhance the following skills-independent learning-transfer of theoretical concepts to problem-based applications. More specifically it the course develops the following abilities:
        To develop derived data sets, to integrate data from a range of disciplines to develop coherent conceptual models, quantification of conceptual models, solving non-routine problems and think / solve three-dimensional and four-dimensional (in space and time) problems.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        30%

        Written

        10%

        Practical

        60%

        Stage/Level

        5

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV4038

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Assessment of Environmental Impacts
        Overview

        This module aims to introduce students to how the impacts of engineering projects are assessed within the framework Life Cycle Assessment, Environmental Impact Assessment and sustainability evaluations. Particular emphasis is given to environmental impacts, although societal impacts will also be considered.
        Students will be introduced to the regulatory drivers for Environmental Impact Assessment/Strategic Environmental Assessment. The use of sustainability assessments (CEEQUAL, BREAM etc) will also be explored. Students will be introduced to current standards and guidance for quantifying environmental impacts through Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), including defining the scope of an LCA, inventory analysis and interpretation of results. Finally students will examine multi criteria analysis for evaluating and balancing diverse criteria during decision making.

        Solid waste and resource management and renewable energies will then be studied in detail within this context.
        • Students will gain an understanding of the science and technology behind advanced waste management processes and an appreciation of the financial, social and environmental factors that may restrict the adoption of particular technologies.
        • Students will be introduced to a variety of renewable energy technologies, such as wind, solar, tidal and wave power as well as geothermal and biomass energy. The lecture syllabus will also include an introduction to the policy framework for renewable energies within the UK and Ireland.

        Learning Outcomes

        By the end of this module, the student should have knowledge and understanding of:
        • the regulatory drivers for Environmental Impact Assessment/Strategic Environmental Assessment
        • the current standards and guidance for quantifying environmental impacts through Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)
        • relevant legislation relating to different waste management scenarios
        • how to define sustainable resource management, the waste hierarchy and concept of zero waste
        • how to evaluate the social, economic and environmental impacts of various waste streams
        • how to critically evaluate and communicate succinctly the relationship between wastes/resource management and sustainable development
        • regional waste strategies and demonstrate their links to land use planning
        • the various stakeholders in the waste management decision making process
        • the key concepts of renewable energy technologies and how they are applied
        • the key fundamentals of the regulatory framework for the application of renewable energy technologies and how it is applied
        • the basic criteria for the assessment of conceptual suitability of renewable energy technologies

        By the end of this module, the student should be able to:
        • define the scope of an LCA and undertake inventory analysis
        • understand how life cycle approaches are employed in industry through resource management, low carbon construction and carbon/energy/water foot printing
        • define the need to, and difficulty of, balancing diverse criteria during decision making processes
        • make cases for the adoption of a particular waste/resource technology or combination of waste technologies
        • identify technical, financial and social risks associated with different waste management technologies
        • transfer and apply basic principles underlying the application of renewable energy technologies to real life examples
        • assess key aspects of conceptual suitability of renewable energy technologies

        Skills

        By the end of this module, the student should be able to:
        • apply the stages of Environmental Impact Assessment
        • use sustainability assessments (CEEQUAL, BREAM etc) for construction projects
        • interpret the results of a life cycle assessment
        • undertake an options appraisal using MCA
        • critically evaluate scientific and trade literature relating to advanced waste and resource management technologies
        • identify potential barriers to the implementation of particular technologies (waste and energy) at particular locations
        • make technical appraisals of proposed new waste and energy projects/processes
        • evaluate the environmental impacts of waste/resource management and energy technologies

        The key skills developed by taking this module include:
        • Independent learning
        • Project-orientated group work
        • The ability to propose, assess and evaluate solutions based on both qualitative and quantitative technical data
        • Decision making based on multiple sources of information
        • The ability to critically evaluate and communicate succinctly relationships between disciplines
        • Applying key theoretical concepts and analysis techniques to real life case study examples, allowing students to formulate the results of conceptual assessments in the form of clear, concise and coherent technical reports

        Assessment

        The coursework requires the submission of all assignments.

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        10%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        5

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        CIV4039

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

  • Entry Requirements

    Entrance requirements

    A level requirements
    AAA including Mathematics and at least one from Biology, Chemistry, Computing, Digital Technology, Environmental Technology, Geography, ICT (not Applied ICT), Physics, Software Systems Development or Technology and Design.
    Irish leaving certificate requirements
    H2H2H3H3H3H3 including Higher Level grade H2 in Mathematics and a Science subject (see list under A-level list requirements)
    International Baccalaureate Diploma
    36 points overall, including 6,6,6 at Higher Level, including Mathematics and a Science subject (see list under A-level requirements).
    Graduate
    A minimum of a 2:2 Honours Degree, provided any subject requirement is also met.
    Access/Foundation Course
    Not considered. Applicants should apply for the BEng Civil Engineering degree.
    Note
    Applicants not offering Physics at A-level should have a minimum of a grade B/6 in GCSE Physics or GCSE Double Award Science grades BB/66.
    Further information
    Applicants for the MEng degree will automatically be considered for admission to the BEng degree if they are not eligible for entry to the MEng degree both at initial offer making stage and when results are received.
    Option to transfer
    Transfers between BEng and MEng may be possible at the end of Stage 2.

    Selection Criteria

    In addition, to the entrance requirements above, it is essential that you read our guidance below on 'How we choose our students' prior to submitting your UCAS application.

    Applications are dealt with centrally by the Admissions and Access Service rather than by the School of Natural and Built Environment. Once your application has been processed by UCAS and forwarded to Queen's, an acknowledgement is normally sent within two weeks of its receipt at the University.

    Selection is on the basis of the information provided on your UCAS form, which is considered by an Admissions Manager/Officer from the Admissions and Access Service and, if appropriate, the Selector from the School. Decisions are made on an ongoing basis and will be notified to you via UCAS.

    Applicants for MEng Honours Degrees in Civil Engineering, Environmental and Civil Engineering and Structural Engineering with Architecture must be able to satisfy the University's General Entrance Requirement; it should be noted that a strong performance at GCSE is essential. For last year's entry, applicants for this MEng programme must have had, or been able to achieve, a minimum of 6 GCSE passes at grade B/6 or better (to include Mathematics and Physics/Double Award Science). Selectors will also check that any specific subject and grade requirements in terms of A-level can be fulfilled (see Entry Requirements).
    .
    Offers are normally made on the basis of 3 A-levels. Applicants repeating A-levels require BBC at the first attempt and offers will be made in terms of A-level grades AAA including Mathematics plus a relevant Science (see entry requirements). Applicants are not normally asked to attend for interview.

    Applicants offering two A-levels including Mathematics plus a relevant Science (see entry requirements) and one BTEC Subsidiary Diploma/National Extended Certificate (or equivalent qualification) will also be considered. Offers will be made in terms of the overall BTEC grade(s) awarded. Please note that a maximum of one BTEC Subsidiary Diploma/National Extended Certificate (or equivalent) will be counted as part of an applicant’s portfolio of qualifications. The normal GCSE profile will be expected.

    A-level General Studies and A-level Critical Thinking are not normally considered as part of a three A-level offer and, although they may be excluded where an applicant is taking 4 A-level subjects, the grade achieved could be taken into account if necessary in August/September.

    Applicants offering other qualifications, such as the International Baccalaureate or Irish Leaving Certificate, will also be considered.

    Applicants offering BTEC Extended Diplomas/National Extended Diplomas, Higher National Certificates and Higher National Diplomas are not normally considered for MEng entry but, if eligible, will be made a change course offer for the corresponding BEng programme. Subject to satisfactory academic performance during the first two years of the BEng course, it may be possible for students to transfer to the MEng programme in Civil Engineering, Environmental and Civil Engineering or Structural Engineering with Architecture at the end of Stage 2.

    The information provided in the personal statement section and the academic reference together with predicted grades are noted but these are not the final deciding factors in whether or not a conditional offer can be made. However, they may be reconsidered in a tiebreak situation in August.

    If you are made an offer then you may be invited to an Open Day, which is usually held during the second semester. This will allow you the opportunity to visit the University and to find out more about the degree programme of your choice; the facilities on offer. It also gives you a flavour of the academic and social life at Queen's.

    If you cannot find the information you need here, please contact the University Admissions and Access Service (admissions@qub.ac.uk), giving full details of your qualifications and educational background.

    International Students

    Our country/region pages include information on entry requirements, tuition fees, scholarships, student profiles, upcoming events and contacts for your country/region. Use the dropdown list below for specific information for your country/region.

    English Language Requirements

    An IELTS score of 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in each test component or an equivalent acceptable qualification, details of which are available at: http://go.qub.ac.uk/EnglishLanguageReqs

    If you need to improve your English language skills before you enter this degree programme, INTO Queen's University Belfast offers a range of English language courses. These intensive and flexible courses are designed to improve your English ability for admission to this degree.

    • Academic English: an intensive English language and study skills course for successful university study at degree level
    • Pre-sessional English: a short intensive academic English course for students starting a degree programme at Queen's University Belfast and who need to improve their English.

    International Students - Foundation and International Year One Programmes

    INTO Queen's offers a range of academic and English language programmes to help prepare international students for undergraduate study at Queen's University. You will learn from experienced teachers in a dedicated international study centre on campus, and will have full access to the University's world-class facilities.

    These programmes are designed for international students who do not meet the required academic and English language requirements for direct entry.

    INTO - English Language Course(QSIS ELEMENT IS EMPTY)

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    Careers

  • Careers

    Career Prospects

    Introduction
    On graduating with an Honours degree, students are able to choose from a range of rewarding and challenging careers in Civil Engineering and are also sought after in accountancy, commerce, education and research. The majority of graduates take up posts associated with design and construction. Some embark on management, accountancy and finance careers, while others go into teaching and research. Employment in consulting engineers' offices and in the public sector will centre on feasibility, planning and detailed design. Alternatively, work with a contracting company will provide extensive experience on site where management skills are important in addition to technical knowledge. Our engineering graduates are also to be found in many other areas of employment where the skills and discipline of evaluating facts, decision making and management have provided them with the basis for rewarding and interesting careers.

    Studying for a civil engineering degree at Queen’s will assist you in developing the core skills and employment-related experiences that are valued by employers, professional organisations and academic institutions. Graduates from this degree at Queen’s are well regarded by many employers (local, national and international) and over half of all graduate jobs are now open to graduates of any discipline, including Civil Engineering.

    Although the majority of our graduates are interested in pursuing careers in Civil Engineering significant numbers develop careers in a wide range of other sectors.

    Employment Links
    We regularly consult and develop links with a large number of local, national and international employers including, some of who provide sponsorship through the national QUEST Scholarship Scheme. Queen’s is among the top universities in the number of scholarships gained. In addition, we have a Civil Engineering Advisory Panel including members from the major employer sectors. This panel forms the benchmark for the UK Civil Engineering Accrediting body, the Joint Board of Moderators.

    Placement Employers
    Many of our students have also gained international work placement through organisations such as the International Association for the Exchange of Students for Technical Experience.

    Additional Awards Gained(QSIS ELEMENT IS EMPTY)

    Prizes and Awards(QSIS ELEMENT IS EMPTY)

    Degree plus award for extra-curricular skills

    In addition to your degree programme, at Queen's you can have the opportunity to gain wider life, academic and employability skills. For example, placements, voluntary work, clubs, societies, sports and lots more. So not only do you graduate with a degree recognised from a world leading university, you'll have practical national and international experience plus a wider exposure to life overall. We call this Degree Plus. It's what makes studying at Queen's University Belfast special.

  • Fees and Funding

    Tuition Fees

    Northern Ireland (NI) 1 £4,630
    Republic of Ireland (ROI) 2 £4,630
    England, Scotland or Wales (GB) 1 £9,250
    EU Other 3 £23,100
    International £23,100

    1 EU citizens in the EU Settlement Scheme, with settled status, will be charged the NI or GB tuition fee based on where they are ordinarily resident. Students who are ROI nationals resident in GB will be charged the GB fee.

    2 EU students who are ROI nationals resident in ROI are eligible for NI tuition fees.

    3 EU Other students (excludes Republic of Ireland nationals living in GB, NI or ROI) are charged tuition fees in line with international fees.

    All tuition fees quoted relate to a single year of study unless stated otherwise. The NI and ROI fees relate to academic year 2022-23 and will be updated to 2023-24 rates once they have been confirmed. All fees will be subject to an annual inflationary increase, unless explicitly stated otherwise.

    NI, GB and ROI fees for 2022 entry will be published soon. International fees for 2022 entry can be viewed here: www.qub.ac.uk/International/International-students/International-tuition-fees

    Tuition fee rates are calculated based on a student’s tuition fee status and generally increase annually by inflation. How tuition fees are determined is set out in the Student Finance Framework.

    Additional course costs

    All Students

    Depending on the programme of study, there may be extra costs which are not covered by tuition fees, which students will need to consider when planning their studies.

    Students can borrow books and access online learning resources from any Queen's library.

    If students wish to purchase recommended texts, rather than borrow them from the University Library, prices per text can range from £30 to £100. A programme may have up to 6 modules per year, each with a recommended text.  

    Students should also budget between £30 to £75 per year for photocopying, memory sticks and printing charges.  

    Students undertaking a period of work placement or study abroad, as either a compulsory or optional part of their programme, should be aware that they will have to fund additional travel and living costs.

    If a final year includes a major project or dissertation, there may be costs associated with transport, accommodation and/or materials. The amount will depend on the project chosen. There may also be additional costs for printing and binding.

    Students may wish to consider purchasing an electronic device; costs will vary depending on the specification of the model chosen.

    There are also additional charges for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines.

    Civil Engineering with a year in industry costs

    "In year 1 students are required to buy safety boots, basic boots start at £10.

    There is a residential field trip at the end of year 1 which is a compulsory part of the Surveying Module, costs are currently £220.

    Students undertake a placement in year 3 and are responsible for funding travel, accommodation and subsistence costs. These costs vary depending on the location and duration of the placement. Students may receive payment from their placement provider during their placement year.

    How do I fund my study?

    There are different tuition fee and student financial support arrangements for students from Northern Ireland, those from England, Scotland and Wales (Great Britain), and those from the rest of the European Union.

    Information on funding options and financial assistance for undergraduate students is available at www.qub.ac.uk/Study/Undergraduate/Fees-and-scholarships/.

    Scholarships

    Each year, we offer a range of scholarships and prizes for new students. Information on scholarships available.

    International Scholarships

    Information on scholarships for international students, is available at www.qub.ac.uk/International/International-students/International-scholarships/.

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    Careers

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    Apply

  • Apply

    How and when to Apply

    How to Apply

    Application for admission to full-time undergraduate and sandwich courses at the University should normally be made through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS). Full information can be obtained from the UCAS website at: www.ucas.com/students.

    When to Apply

    UCAS will start processing applications for entry in autumn 2023 from 1 September 2022.

    Advisory closing date: 25 January 2023 (18:00). This is the 'equal consideration' deadline for this course.

    Applications from UK and EU (Republic of Ireland) students after this date are, in practice, considered by Queen’s for entry to this course throughout the remainder of the application cycle (30 June 2023) subject to the availability of places.

    Applications from International and EU (Other) students are normally considered by Queen’s for entry to this course until 30 June 2023. If you apply for 2023 entry after this deadline, you will automatically be entered into Clearing.

    Applicants are encouraged to apply as early as is consistent with having made a careful and considered choice of institutions and courses.

    The Institution code name for Queen's is QBELF and the institution code is Q75.

    Further information on applying to study at Queen's is available at: www.qub.ac.uk/Study/Undergraduate/How-to-apply/

    Apply via UCAS

    Terms and Conditions

    The terms and conditions that apply when you accept an offer of a place at the University on a taught programme of study. Queen's University Belfast Terms and Conditions.

    Additional Information for International (non-EU) Students

    1. Applying through UCAS
      Most students make their applications through UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service) for full-time undergraduate degree programmes at Queen's. The UCAS application deadline for international students is 30 June 2023.
    2. Applying direct
      The Direct Entry Application form is to be used by international applicants who wish to apply directly, and only, to Queen's or who have been asked to provide information in advance of submitting a formal UCAS application. Find out more.
    3. Applying through agents and partners
      The University’s in-country representatives can assist you to submit a UCAS application or a direct application. Please consult the Agent List to find an agent in your country who will help you with your application to Queen’s University.

    Download a prospectus

    Keywords(QSIS ELEMENT IS EMPTY)

Register your interest
Course Vacancy Status

Below is the current vacancy status for this course. For further information please contact us.

Student Type
Places available?
NI and RoI Students
GB Students
International and EU (not RoI) Students