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MLibArts Liberal Arts

Academic Year 2019/20

A programme specification is required for any programme on which a student may be registered. All programmes of the University are subject to the University's Quality Assurance processes. All degrees are awarded by Queen's University Belfast.

Programme Title MLibArts Liberal Arts Final Award
(exit route if applicable for Postgraduate Taught Programmes)
Master of Liberal Arts
Programme Code LIB-MLBA UCAS Code Y300 HECoS Code 100065
ATAS Clearance Required No
Mode of Study Full Time
Type of Programme Undergraduate Master Length of Programme 4 Academic Year(s) Total Credits for Programme 480
Exit Awards available

INSTITUTE INFORMATION

Teaching Institution

Queen's University Belfast

School/Department

Arts, English and Languages

Framework for Higher Education Qualification Level 
www.qaa.ac.uk

Level 7

QAA Benchmark Group
www.qaa.ac.uk/quality-code/subject-benchmark-statements

Accreditations (PSRB)

REGULATION INFORMATION

Does the Programme have any approved exemptions from the University General Regulations
(Please see General Regulations)

N/A

Programme Specific Regulations

At each Level students take 120 CATS. The programme involves four designations of modules:

• Liberal Arts modules – these are core modules
• Interdisciplinary modules – these are modules of an interdisciplinary nature
• Pathway modules are normally discipline-specific modules which form part of either a discipline-specific or thematic pathway
• Optional modules are modules available to students

Modules may be multiple designations

Students will be notified each academic year of the optional modules being offered in the following academic year. Students are advised that not all optional modules will necessarily be offered in each academic year. Also, the delivery of a module may be subject to a minimum number of enrolments as well as unforeseen circumstances (eg illness of a member of staff). The range and content of optional modules will change over time as degree programmes develop and students' choice of optional modules may also be limited due to timetabling constraints.

Students with protected characteristics

N/A

Are students subject to Fitness to Practise Regulations

(Please see General Regulations)

No

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF PROGRAMME

To explore the value of the arts and humanities for understanding society today.

To understand how and what we can learn from exploring contemporary issues through a range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives.

To develop skills in critical analysis, independent learning, teamwork, and effective communication.

To provide opportunities to engage intellectually with a range of subjects as well as develop disciplinary strength and advance students’ linguistic abilities.

To equip students with an unrivalled set of skills and experiences as well as a wide range of disciplinary perspectives on the world today.

To allow students to design their own programme of study, explore multiple subjects and in doing so help pave the way for a range of career opportunities.

To produce adaptable and intelligent graduates capable of engaging confidently in understanding challenges and offering insights from multiple perspectives.

To foster self-motivated learning and to develop reflective lifelong leaders and learners in national and international environments.

To educate in a liberal environment of equality, tolerance and mutual respect and to instil the values of diversity, pluralism and inclusivity.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Learning Outcomes: Cognitive Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

1. link varied pedagogical approaches to their degree pathway
2. differentiate between discipline-specific approaches to the subject
3. explore ways in which the uses of the past relate to their degree pathway
4. engage with material, oral, textual and visual versions of the past
5. demonstrate an in-depth awareness of issues of plurality and diversity within the arts and humanities
6. contextualise their studies to date within a pedagogical framework defined by and dedicated to plurality
7. recognise and demonstrate the relations between cognate disciplines in the arts and humanities and their contribution to diversity in society

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Seminars offer a variety of tutor-led and student-led learning opportunities as well as a more sustained opportunity to debate and evaluate a breadth of knowledge gained independently from directed reading and from the sharing of resources and information. (1, 2, 4)
Class discussion, in which analysis and interpretation of issues, texts and contexts takes place, allows the students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material. It allows for both tutor- and student-led opportunities for the discussion and comprehension of directed reading and secondary source information.
Student-centred learning situations encourage the ability to present and summarise knowledge to peers in a coherent, structured form, and to further enhance organisational and inter-personal skills.
Lectures offer students both an overview of a particular subject and discipline-specific insight on any given issue that informs student-led discussion in seminars and group work.

Methods of Assessment

Progress through the degree is one in which the autonomous learning undertaken by students is gradually increased, from lecture/tutorial based teaching at stages 1 and 2, to student-centred learning, through 2- or 3-hour seminars, at stages 3 and 4.
At each stage of learning, essays require that students demonstrate coverage of material, appropriate methods of analysis, the ability to discriminate between arguments, and the ability to form an independent argument. They test students’ ability to collect, order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which to present and prioritise material. Essay lengths vary dependent upon the requirements of the particular module and the stage of student progression.

Across the diverse disciplines available on the programme, with students able to choose from a number of pathway fields, subject-specific requirements will assess cognitive skills and support student learning.

The use of online journals will hone students’ digital literacy skills while offering week-to-week summaries of learning to date, allowing understanding of knowledge to be aligned with application in relevant contexts.

Group work improves collective responsibility, teamwork and leadership skills, while peer assessment components require that students engage with the learning and assessment criteria in specific but also facilitative ways.

Coursework must be submitted in a specified form, to fixed deadlines, thus teaching students to learn to prioritise assignments and objectives and to hone their organisational and time-management skills.

Feedback is provided for each type and instance of assessment and students may seek dedicated feedback sessions with course tutors. The Personal Tutor system facilitates student reflection upon academic performance and assists in developing strategies for improvement. Peer assessment reinforces student awareness that the feedback process is not a one-way system from staff to student but is embedded within the practice of tertiary level education.

Presentational skills, including digital, electronic and visual aids are key to the success of the mini-conference assessment in the final year; formative skills in this regard are embedded in the use of video blogs as an assessment component in some core Liberal Arts modules. The submission of online and presentational materials for assessment requires students to keep professional as well as academic standards in mind at all times.

Learning Outcomes: Knowledge & Understanding

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

1. demonstrate understanding of a range of different disciplines
2. understand through a range of discipline-centred conceptions the multiple ways we can use and interpret the past
3. demonstrate understanding of the multiple public roles of the arts and humanities and the challenges facing them in the twenty-first century
4. demonstrate critical understanding of how their discipline contributes to the contemporary world
5. explain how their learning, and a study abroad or placement, combine in diverse and multiple ways
6. demonstrate a developed critical understanding of an interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary area of study

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures offer students both an overview of a particular subject and discipline-specific insight on any given issue that informs student-led discussion in seminars and group work.

External Visits provide students with real-world experience of the many and varied roles that the arts and humanities play in society.
Class discussion, in which analysis and interpretation of issues, texts and contexts takes place, allows the students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material. It allows for both tutor- and student-led opportunities for the discussion and comprehension of directed reading and secondary source information.
Student-centred learning situations encourage the ability to present and summarise knowledge to peers in a coherent, structured form, and to further enhance organisational and inter-personal skills.

The supervised dissertation allows students the opportunity to develop in-depth engagement with a particular issue or theme relevant to their degree under the guidance of a member of academic staff.

Methods of Assessment

In the criteria for assessment of written and oral work particular attention is paid to the student’s awareness of different methodological approaches and debates.

A range of assessment methods ensures that these skills are evaluated in different ways. Subject-specific requirements will ensure that assessments are based on in disciplinary knowledge and will assess and support student learning through formative and summative assignments.
Formative written work assists the development of understanding, critical judgment, and independent thought, both through the feedback given, and through the process of writing itself.
Summative assessments provide key moments to measure attainment of knowledge and to develop discipline-specific understanding; subject feedback will assist students in their progression in their chosen pathway.
Essays require that students demonstrate coverage of material, appropriate methods of analysis, the ability to discriminate between arguments, and the ability to form an independent argument. They test students’ ability to collect, order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which to present and prioritise material.

The online journal hones students’ digital literacy skills while offering week-to-week summaries of learning to date, allowing understanding of knowledge to be aligned with application in relevant contexts. For those students opting to take the Placement module, the online journal is a weekly record of the student’s own reflective learning within a work-based environment and complements the final essay or employer-guided project as a key component of assessment and student attainment.

Group work improves collective responsibility, teamwork and leadership skills, while peer assessment components require that students engage with the learning and assessment criteria in specific but also facilitative ways.

Presentational skills, including digital, electronic and visual aids are key to the success of the mini-conference assessment in the final year; formative skills in this regard are embedded in the use of video blogs as an assessment component in some core Liberal Arts modules. The submission of online and presentational materials for assessment requires students to keep professional as well as academic standards in mind at all times.

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

1. understand the diverse methods and approaches of arts and humanities subjects at university level
2. demonstrate advanced engagement with one or more chosen subjects
3. utilise critical vocabularies and engage with different critical and theoretical perspectives across a range of cognate subjects
4. demonstrate awareness of key debates concerning the development of arts and humanities disciplines and of liberal arts as a methodology in itself
5. display familiarity with bibliographic conventions and be able to research, reference and present written work according to the requirements of one or more subject areas
6. read primary and secondary texts with a developed awareness and appreciation of their contextual, formal, structural and generic properties and how they produce particular discipline-specific information

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures offer students both an overview of a particular subject and discipline-specific insight on any given issue that informs student-led discussion in seminars and group work.

External Visits provide students with real-world experience of the role that the arts and humanities play in society.

Class discussion, in which analysis and interpretation of issues, texts and contexts takes place, allows the students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material. It allows for both tutor- and student-led opportunities for the discussion and comprehension of directed reading and secondary source information.

Student-centred learning situations encourage the ability to present and summarise knowledge to peers in a coherent, structured form, and to further enhance organisational and inter-personal skills.

The supervised dissertation allows students the opportunity to develop in-depth engagement with a particular issue or theme relevant to their degree under the guidance of a member of academic staff.

Writing skills tutorials and workshops develop a student’s ability to structure and write a coherent and lucid essay. Research skills in online bibliographical searches and the use of archives and libraries are developed through research skills workshops. Students also have the opportunity to attend classes in database management.

Formative work – both written and oral – enables students to combine the knowledge and skills developed through lectures and tutorials, and to formulate, and receive feedback on, their own independent arguments.

Module and programme information and style sheets guide students in their choice of, access to, and citation of relevant secondary materials.

Methods of Assessment

Essays require that students demonstrate coverage of material, appropriate methods of analysis, the ability to discriminate between arguments, and the ability to form an independent argument. They test students’ ability to collect, order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which to present and prioritise material.

Across the diverse disciplines available on the programme, with students able to choose from a number of pathway fields, subject-specific skills will be assessed with appropriate assignments designed to measure attainment and support student learning.

The online journal hones students’ digital literacy skills while offering week-to-week summaries of learning to date, allowing understanding of knowledge in a specific subject or module to be aligned with application in relevant contexts.

Group work on the core Liberal Arts modules will enhance the cohort dynamic and improve collective responsibility, teamwork and leadership skills. Peer assessment components require that students engage with the learning and assessment criteria in specific but also facilitative ways that meet the programme aims and objectives.

Coursework must be submitted in a specified form, to fixed deadlines, thus teaching students to learn to prioritise assignments and objectives and to hone their organisational and time-management skills.

Feedback is provided for each type and instance of assessment and students may seek dedicated feedback sessions with course tutors. The Personal Tutor system facilitates student reflection upon academic performance and assists in developing strategies for improvement. Peer assessment reinforces student awareness that the feedback process is not a one-way system from staff to student but is embedded within the practice of tertiary level education.

Presentational skills, including digital, electronic and visual aids are key to the success of the mini-conference assessment in the final year; formative skills in this regard are embedded in the use of video blogs as an assessment component in some core Liberal Arts modules. The submission of online and presentational materials for assessment requires students to keep professional as well as academic standards in mind at all times.

The dissertation is a sustained piece of independent research that draws together the multiple fields of learning on the programme in the analysis and discussion of a student-chosen topic. The application of subject-specific skills learned over the course of the programme will be central to the genesis of this independent research project as well as its supervision, development and final completion.

Learning Outcomes: Transferable Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

1. demonstrate a capacity for appropriate problem-solving in relation to contemporary debates
2. engage in classroom debate and group work and foster a stimulating intellectual environment producing engaged critical responses to the issues raised on the module
3. demonstrate critical self-reflection on the learning process ALL LA
4. incorporate learning into discussion of issues and texts
5. to advocate for the arts and humanities as key components of any society and articulate the value of the arts and humanities in society
6. demonstrate developed awareness of the roles that arts and humanities subjects play in the wider world
7. demonstrate effective oral communication, presentation and group work skills
8. structure, manage and adapt strategies for self-directed independent research
9. write coherent, structured, and relevant responses to specific questions
10. apply theoretical concepts of study to workplace scenarios
11. provide peer support and constructive feedback through group work
12. demonstrate enhanced group and teamwork skills based on open and supportive communication and the ability to provide constructive peer feedback
13. construct and present an appropriate and relevant case study
14. write cogent, well-illustrated assignments, which display originality of consistent thinking and application of ideas, concepts and theories
15. demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent line of research
16. demonstrate advanced skills of setting and solving research questions
17. demonstrate an advanced ability to make links between subjects of study and develop interdisciplinarity more critically

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures offer students both an overview of a particular subject and discipline-specific insight on any given issue that informs student-led discussion in seminars and group work.

External Visits provide students with real-world experience of the many and varied roles that the arts and humanities play in society.

Class discussion, in which analysis and interpretation of issues, texts and contexts takes place, allows the students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material. It allows for both tutor- and student-led opportunities for the discussion and comprehension of directed reading and secondary source information.

Student-centred learning situations encourage the ability to present and summarise knowledge to peers in a coherent, structured form, and to further enhance organisational and inter-personal skills.

Engagement with Personal Tutors promotes student reflection upon academic performance. Personal Tutors also discuss career options with students; and the Schools work closely with the Careers Liaison Officer to present students with information on possible careers.

Group projects are used to encourage students to collaborate with peers, negotiate the demands of teamwork and develop their understanding of a topic.

Student preparation for seminars/tutorials requires them to read a variety of material and discuss this with their peers and the tutor. They may make individual or group presentations analysing the material in class.

Writing skills tutorials and workshops develop a student’s ability to structure and write a coherent and lucid essay. Research skills in online bibliographical searches and the use of archives and libraries are developed through research skills workshops. Students also have the opportunity to attend classes in database management.

The supervised dissertation allows students the opportunity to develop in-depth engagement with a particular issue or theme relevant to their degree under the guidance of a member of academic staff.

Writing skills tutorials and workshops develop a student’s ability to structure and write a coherent and lucid essay. Research skills in online bibliographical searches and the use of archives and libraries are developed through research skills workshops. Students also have the opportunity to attend classes in database management.

Methods of Assessment

Progress through the degree is one in which the autonomous learning undertaken by students is gradually increased, from lecture/tutorial based teaching at stages 1 and 2, to student-centred learning, through 2- or 3-hour seminars, at stages 3 and 4.

Essays require that students demonstrate flexibility in relation to assessment requirements and appropriate time-management skills in order to complete the task in full and on time. They test students’ ability to collect, order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which to present and prioritise material. At each Stage, students learn the important skills of discrimination in relation to relevant resources and the varying demands placed upon them by different assessment lengths and deadlines.

The online journal hones students’ digital literacy skills while offering week-to-week summaries of learning to date, allowing understanding of knowledge to be aligned with application in relevant contexts.

Group work improves collective responsibility, teamwork and leadership skills, while peer assessment components require that students engage with the learning and assessment criteria in specific but also facilitative ways.

Coursework must be submitted in a specified form, to fixed deadlines, thus teaching students to learn to prioritise assignments and objectives and to hone their organisational skills to ensure the subject- and programme-specific requirements are met with due consideration given to planning, drafting and peer or tutor consultation.

Feedback is provided for each type and instance of assessment and students may seek dedicated feedback sessions with course tutors. The Personal Tutor system facilitates student reflection upon academic performance and assists in developing strategies for improvement. Peer assessment reinforces student awareness that the feedback process is not a one-way system from staff to student but is embedded within the practice of tertiary level education.

Presentational skills, including digital, electronic and visual aids are key to the success of the mini-conference assessment in the final year; formative skills in this regard are embedded in the use of video blogs as an assessment component in some core Liberal Arts modules.

The Placement module provides students with work-based experiential learning: the online journal will be a space in which key transferable skills and the reflective learning accrued during a “hands-on” role in an arts sector employer or institution is recorded and updated across the semester.

The dissertation is a sustained piece of independent research that draws together the multiple fields of learning on the programme in the analysis and discussion of a student-chosen topic. It tests a student’s originality, initiative, and resourcefulness in a number of key areas: project design; collaborative engagement (with supervisor); archival, library and digital researching; resource management; delivery of a final project to appropriate academic standards.

MODULE INFORMATION

Stages and Modules

Module Title Module Code Level/ stage Credits

Availability

Duration Pre-requisite

Assessment

S1 S2 Core Option Coursework % Practical % Examination %
English in Transition ENG1001 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Philosophy and Human Nature PHL1001 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
English in Context ENG1002 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Writing About Theatre: Theory, Criticism and Performance DRA1001 1 20 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Introduction to Film Studies 1 FLM1001 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Introduction to Film Studies 2 FLM1002 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 40% 0% 60%
Dynamic Earth GGY1007 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 40% 0% 60%
Solo Performance 1 MUS1017 1 20 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 20% 80% 0%
Music in History MUS1041 1 20 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Introduction to English Language ENL1001 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 70% 30% 0%
Intro to French Studies 1 FRH1003 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Exploring History 1 HIS1003 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Perspectives on Politics PAI1007 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Comparative Politics PAI1009 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Introduction to Iberian Studies SPA1005 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Being Creative: Music Media and the Arts ESA1001 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Intro to French Studies 2 FRH1004 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Exploring History 2 HIS1002 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Contemporary Europe PAI1001 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
World Politics PAI1006 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Philosophy and The Good Life PHL1004 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 30% 10% 60%
Introduction to Latin American Studies SPA1008 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Being Human: Evolution Culture and Society ANT1001 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
A World on the Move:Historical and Anthropological Approaches to Globalization ANT1003 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 80% 0% 20%
Visual Studies: Theory and Practice FLM1005 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 80% 20% 0%
History and Historians: Contested Pasts HIS1001 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Europe in Prehistory ARP1008 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 60% 0% 40%
From Romans to Normans: The Archaeology of Historic Europe ARP1010 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 30% 30% 40%
Ancient Humans and Landscapes ARP1006 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 80% 0% 20%
Environmental Change: past, present and future ARP1007 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 50% 30% 20%
Quantitative Methods ECO1009 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 0% 0% 100%
Irish Folklore CEL1004 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Introduction To World Archaeology ARP1013 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 50% 20% 30%
Introductory Logic PHL1003 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 0% 20% 80%
Introduction to Music MUS1002 1 20 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Spanish 1 SPA1101 1 40 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 45% 20% 35%
Intermediate Spanish SPA1111 1 40 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 45% 20% 35%
Spanish for Beginners SPA1121 1 40 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 45% 20% 35%
French 1 FRH1101 1 40 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 45% 20% 35%
Intermediate French FRH1111 1 40 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 45% 20% 35%
Beginners French Studies (Post GCSE Level) FRH1121 1 40 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 45% 20% 35%
Portuguese 1 SPA1131 1 40 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 45% 20% 35%
Introduction to Lusophone Studies SPA1132 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Gaeilge 1 CEL1101 1 40 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 45% 20% 35%
Issues in Contemporary Politics PAI1003 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Processes and Principles of Physical Geography GGY1009 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 70% 0% 30%
Human Geographies of the Modern World GGY1011 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Spaces of Development GGY1012 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 50% 0% 50%
Adventures in the History of Ideas ENG1008 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 80% 0% 20%
1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 70% 30% 0%
Theatre Now: Contemporary Performance DRA1005 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 50% 50% 0%
Audio Mixing I MUS1030 1 10 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Introduction to Sound Synthesis MUS1036 1 10 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Musicianship MUS1005 1 20 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 50% 50% 0%
Sound Recording and Production 1 MUS1038 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 60% 40% 0%
Ensemble Performance 1 MUS1018 1 20 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 0% 100% 0%
History and Society HIS1005 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 60% 40% 0%
Understanding Now LIB1001 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 65% 35% 0%
Economy, Society, and Public Policy 1 ECO1015 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 30% 0% 70%
Economy, Society, and Public Policy 2 ECO1016 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 30% 0% 70%
Mapping the Anglo-Saxon World ENG2003 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Knowledge and Reality PHL2001 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Foundations for Speech Analysis: The Phonetics of English ENL2001 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 70% 30% 0%
The American South 1619-1865 HIS2028 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Language and Power ENL2002 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 80% 0% 20%
Politics and Society in 20th Century Ireland HIS2012 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 30% 10% 60%
2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Solo Performance 2 MUS2017 2 20 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 20% 80% 0%
2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Fame MUS2043 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 70% 30% 0%
Politics and Policy of the European Union PAI2001 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Modern Political Thought PAI2005 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
The Politics of Deeply Divided Societies PAI2011 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 30% 0% 70%
Managerial Economics ECO2009 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Shakespeare and Co ENG2050 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Irish Literature ENG2081 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Classical Analysis MUS2015 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Irish Politics PAI2013 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
International Relations PAI2017 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Studying Politics PAI2043 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
The Letters of Paul THE2011 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
The Christian Doctrinal Tradition THE2039 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 60% 40% 0%
2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 50% 50% 0%
2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Study of World Religions THE2061 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 40% 60% 0%
Christianity in Ireland since the Reformation THE2097 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
The Roman Origins of the East and West; From Augustus to Charlemagne HIS2049 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Composition II MUS2011 2 20 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Mind and Language PHL2026 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 55% 0% 45%
Europe between the Wars, 1919-1939 HIS2050 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
American Politics PAI2018 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Moral Theories PHL2000 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 35% 10% 55%
The Art of the Actor DRA2003 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
American Theatre DRA2045 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
The making of contemporary Britain: 1914 to the present HIS2018 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Key Debates in Anthropology ANT2022 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
French Noir FRH2030 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Data Analysis and Optimisation ECO2023 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 40% 10% 50%
2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 30% 70% 0%
History of Philosophy PHL2016 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Security and Terrorism PAI2055 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
International Organisations PAI2056 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Notation and Transcription MUS2066 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Nationalism and Liberation in 20th Century Africa HIS2061 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Documentary Film Studies FLM2012 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Macroeconomic Policy and Performance ECO2002 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 40% 0% 60%
Irish Writing and the Short Story CEL2026 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 70% 30% 0%
Uniting Kingdoms HIS2064 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
British Cinema: Nation, Identity and Industry FLM2026 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Representations of Lusophone Africa in Postcolonial Cinema SPA2038 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Questions for an Ageing World SPY2009 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 70% 30% 0%
Apocalypse! End of the World. HAP2065 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Introduction to Arts Management SCA2002 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Issues and Culture of the US-Mexico Borderlands SPA2039 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Educational Drama DRA2007 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Biblical Theology THE2008 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 60% 0% 40%
Spanish 2 SPA2101 2 40 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 45% 20% 35%
The Fantastic in Latin America SPA2040 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
French 2 FRH2101 2 40 YES YES 23 weeks N YES 45% 20% 35%
Portuguese 2 SPA2131 2 40 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 45% 20% 35%
Gaeilge 2 CEL2101 2 40 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 45% 20% 35%
Improvisation MUS2050 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 30% 70% 0%
British Politics in crisis? PAI2002 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 65% 0% 35%
Acting Shakespeare DRA2022 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Experimental Popular Musics MUS2033 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Introduction to the Philosophy of Science PHL2027 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Dúchas na Gaeilge: Skills in Irish Translation CEL2028 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
An Introduction to Critical and Cultural Theory ENG2000 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Scoring and Arranging MUS2053 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 80% 0% 20%
Songwriting MUS2055 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Greek Tragedy In Performance DRA2010 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 60% 40% 0%
Environmental Crimes and Justice SOC2049 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 50% 50% 0%
Uses of the Past LIB2001 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Careers and Placement Preparation Module LIB2002 2 0 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Public Economics ECO3012 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 30% 0% 70%
Labour Economics ECO3019 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
John THE3014 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 40% 20% 40%
Trends in Modern Theology THE3043 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Romans THE3085 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 40% 0% 60%
Christianity in the Sixteenth Century THE3091 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 80% 20% 0%
Current Issues in the Philosophy of Religion THE3054 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Reconciliation Studies 1 THE3068 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 60% 40% 0%
The Church, Ministries and Society 3 THE3050 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 60% 40% 0%
Economic History ECO3020 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 75% 25% 0%
Old Testament Prophetic Texts THE3009 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 60% 0% 40%
Thinking and Singing: an introduction to the wisdom and lyrical books of the Old Testament THE3005 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Arts and Humanities in the Contemporary World LIB3001 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 80% 20% 0%
Study Abroad LIB3002 3 60 YES 12 weeks N YES 50% 0% 50%
Placement LIB3003 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
History and Philosophy of Economics ECO7010 4 15 YES 12 weeks N YES 60% 0% 40%
Global Economic History ECO7013 4 15 YES 12 weeks N YES 25% 25% 50%
Incorrigibly Plural LIB7001 4 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 50% 50% 0%
Liberal Arts Dissertation LIB7002 4 40 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%

Notes

Level 1: Students take LIB1001 (20CATS) plus 20CATS from the list of interdisciplinary modules plus 40 CATS from a pathway plus 40 CATS of optional modules. The list of optional modules will, subject to relevant A-Level or equivalent prerequisites (e.g. for language and music modules) comprise all interdisciplinary and pathway modules as well as other modules offered as part of the single honours programmes in pathway subjects. Please note that the precise modules offered as options may vary from year to year. Students will normally take at least 20 CATS of the designated core modules. At the end of the Level I, students nominate their pathway. The pathways are: Anthropology, Drama, Economics, English, French, Film, History, International Studies, Irish, Music, Philosophy, Politics, Portuguese, Spanish and Theology.

Level 2: Students take LIB2001 (20CATS) plus 20CATS from the list of interdisciplinary modules plus 60 CATS from the chosen pathway plus 20 CATS of optional modules. The list of optional modules will comprise all interdisciplinary and pathway as well as other modules offered as part of the single honours programmes in pathway subjects). Please note that the precise modules offered as options may vary from year to year. Students will normally take at least 20 CATS of the designated core modules. In addition, students take LIB2002 in semester 2 as preparation for LIB3003.

Level 3: Students take LIB3001 (20CATS) plus LIB3002 Study Abroad (60CATS), plus another 40 CATS of modules from the chosen pathway, which may include LIB3003 Placement (20CATS). Please note that the precise modules offered as options may vary from year to year and may be subject to prerequisites.

Level 4: Students take LIB7001 (20CATS) plus LIB7002 (40CATS), at least 20 CATS from the chosen pathway and up to 40 CATS of optional modules. The pathway modules will be drawn from the taught modules offered on the relevant MA programme(s). Please note that the precise modules offered as options may vary from year to year and may be subject to prerequisites.