Skip to Content

detail

LLB Law (Major) and Politics

Academic Year 2019/20

A programme specification is required for any programme on which a student may be registered. All programmes of the University are subject to the University's Quality Assurance processes. All degrees are awarded by Queen's University Belfast.

Programme Title LLB Law (Major) and Politics Final Award
(exit route if applicable for Postgraduate Taught Programmes)
Bachelor of Laws
Programme Code LAW-LLB-MM UCAS Code M1L2 HECoS Code 100485
ATAS Clearance Required No
Mode of Study Full Time
Type of Programme Major Honours Length of Programme 3 Academic Year(s) Total Credits for Programme 360
Exit Awards available

INSTITUTE INFORMATION

Teaching Institution

Queen's University Belfast

School/Department

Law

Framework for Higher Education Qualification Level 
www.qaa.ac.uk

Level 6

QAA Benchmark Group
www.qaa.ac.uk/quality-code/subject-benchmark-statements

Law (2015)

Accreditations (PSRB)

Joint Academic Stage Board (Solicitors Regulation Authority and Bar Standards Board)

Date of most recent Accreditation Visit 30-06-10

Law Society of Northern Ireland

Date of most recent Accreditation Visit 30-06-10

The Bar Northern Ireland

Date of most recent Accreditation Visit 30-06-10

REGULATION INFORMATION

Does the Programme have any approved exemptions from the University General Regulations
(Please see General Regulations)

None

Programme Specific Regulations

Students are normally required to pass (or have been credited for) all modules before progressing to the next level. Students must pass all 18 modules before being awarded the degree.

Students with protected characteristics

N/A

Are students subject to Fitness to Practise Regulations

(Please see General Regulations)

No

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF PROGRAMME

On completion of the programme the student will be able to:

think critically and independently about a task or problems, and plan a response;

reflect on their learning and development, identify and address gaps in their own knowledge/skills, respond constructively to feedback;

work collaboratively;

demonstrate an awareness of principles and values of law and justice, and of ethics

demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the theories, concepts, values, principles and rules that underpin the law in Northern Ireland, and England and Wales, particularly in the Foundations of Legal Knowledge; with awareness of institutional, social, national and global context

demonstrate deep and contextual understanding of substantive areas of law, and tolerate and respond to ambiguity in law; produce synthesis of doctrinal/policy issues and exercise critical judgment, presenting a reasoned choice between alternative solutions and demonstrating awareness of the merits of particular arguments;

demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the core areas of the discipline of Politics.

apply knowledge and understanding to offer evidenced conclusions to complex actual or hypothetical problems;

conduct self-directed research, including the design and development of a project under supervision, identification and retrieval of relevant primary sources, and evaluation and analysis in written and oral forms;

work from a range of data, including textual, numerical and statistical;

communicate orally and in writing, and listen and respond to verbal or written tasks/instructions

reflect upon Politics both by theoretical explorations of the nature of politics and by comparisons with other societies

to encourage, support and foster critical, independent and analytical thinking to enable students to come to their own understanding of politics;

to provide students with an in depth knowledge and understanding of the core areas of the discipline; to complement that essential knowledge with modules from outside the core areas;

to foster an attitude of self-motivated and independent learning;

to equip students with a set of key, subject, employability and transferable skills;

to encourage a professional attitude towards self-organisation and time-management; to equip students to be active and engaged citizens

demonstrate the critical, intellectual and practical skills necessary to sustain life-long education/learning, including the ability to reflect on their own academic integrity

demonstrate the intellectual, practical and transferrable skills to succeed in a wide variety of careers; and an opportunity to obtain a law degree that qualifies for admission to professional legal training.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Learning Outcomes: Cognitive Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Plan and undertake independent research under supervision, asking cogent questions and identifying gaps in their own knowledge and understanding

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The LLB is designed to foster phased progression in the development of intellectual independence. Level 1 modules introduce students to legal sources and methods of legal argument, with a transitional emphasis on developing critical reasoning and analysis. Level 2 offers students opportunities to develop rigour and precision in doctrinal analysis, through problem and argument based assessment-tasks, including a long essay which acts as preparation for level 3 modules/assessment. Level 3 further develops independence and autonomy, requiring study of core substantive areas in greater depth and context.
Reading lists are provided for all modules which direct students to relevant primary and secondary sources. From level 1, students are encouraged to retrieve these sources for themselves to develop familiarity and skill in the use and identification of resources. Instruction in the use of the University Law Library and the QUB online information system are core elements of the first year induction process. The QUB online information system enables students to communicate with staff and other students by email and gain access to learning and teaching resources (including module syllabi and lecture, tutorial and seminar outlines). The entire LLB learning and teaching process requires regular interaction with QUB online system thus ensuring that students acquire and develop a range of IT skills.

Methods of Assessment

Level 1 – open book exams (Criminal Law, EU Con, EU Internal Market); judgment analysis coursework (Legal Method); advocate general opinion (EU Con, EU IML); written coursework essays (Constitutional Law in Context, Rights & Accountability)
Level 2 – open book exams, Advocate-General opinion (EU Con, EU Internal Market); short coursework essays (Equity)
Level 3 –long coursework essays (Contract, Tort, Contemporary Issues in Property Law)
Cognitive skills in the use of IT are not formally assessed; however the acquisition and development of IT skills are integral to the learning and teaching process underpinning the LLB pathway.

Retrieve, sift and select current and relevant primary and secondary legal information from standard and electronic sources.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The LLB is designed to foster phased progression in the development of intellectual independence. Level 1 modules introduce students to legal sources and methods of legal argument, with a transitional emphasis on developing critical reasoning and analysis. Level 2 offers students opportunities to develop rigour and precision in doctrinal analysis, through problem and argument based assessment-tasks, including a long essay which acts as preparation for level 3 modules/assessment. Level 3 further develops independence and autonomy, requiring study of core substantive areas in greater depth and context.
Reading lists are provided for all modules which direct students to relevant primary and secondary sources. From level 1, students are encouraged to retrieve these sources for themselves to develop familiarity and skill in the use and identification of resources. Instruction in the use of the University Law Library and the QUB online information system are core elements of the first year induction process. The QUB online information system enables students to communicate with staff and other students by email and gain access to learning and teaching resources (including module syllabi and lecture, tutorial and seminar outlines). The entire LLB learning and teaching process requires regular interaction with QUB online system thus ensuring that students acquire and develop a range of IT skills.

Methods of Assessment

Level 1 – open book exams (Criminal Law, EU Con, EU Internal Market); judgment analysis coursework (Legal Method); advocate general opinion (EU Con, EU IML); written coursework essays (Constitutional Law in Context, Rights & Accountability)
Level 2 – open book exams, Advocate-General opinion (EU Con, EU Internal Market); short coursework essays (Equity)
Level 3 –long coursework essays (Contract, Tort, Contemporary Issues in Property Law)
Cognitive skills in the use of IT are not formally assessed; however the acquisition and development of IT skills are integral to the learning and teaching process underpinning the LLB pathway.

Apply key legal research skills and methodology; study substantive areas of law in depth and context

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The LLB is designed to foster phased progression in the development of intellectual independence. Level 1 modules introduce students to legal sources and methods of legal argument, with a transitional emphasis on developing critical reasoning and analysis. Level 2 offers students opportunities to develop rigour and precision in doctrinal analysis, through problem and argument based assessment-tasks, including a long essay which acts as preparation for level 3 modules/assessment. Level 3 further develops independence and autonomy, requiring study of core substantive areas in greater depth and context.
Reading lists are provided for all modules which direct students to relevant primary and secondary sources. From level 1, students are encouraged to retrieve these sources for themselves to develop familiarity and skill in the use and identification of resources. Instruction in the use of the University Law Library and the QUB online information system are core elements of the first year induction process. The QUB online information system enables students to communicate with staff and other students by email and gain access to learning and teaching resources (including module syllabi and lecture, tutorial and seminar outlines). The entire LLB learning and teaching process requires regular interaction with QUB online system thus ensuring that students acquire and develop a range of IT skills.

Methods of Assessment

Level 1 – open book exams (Criminal Law, EU Con, EU Internal Market); judgment analysis coursework (Legal Method); advocate general opinion (EU Con, EU IML); written coursework essays (Constitutional Law in Context, Rights & Accountability)
Level 2 – open book exams, Advocate-General opinion (EU Con, EU Internal Market); short coursework essays (Equity)
Level 3 –long coursework essays (Contract, Tort, Contemporary Issues in Property Law)
Cognitive skills in the use of IT are not formally assessed; however the acquisition and development of IT skills are integral to the learning and teaching process underpinning the LLB pathway.

Present information and ideas in a coherent and accurate manner, orally and in written form

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The LLB is designed to foster phased progression in the development of intellectual independence. Level 1 modules introduce students to legal sources and methods of legal argument, with a transitional emphasis on developing critical reasoning and analysis. Level 2 offers students opportunities to develop rigour and precision in doctrinal analysis, through problem and argument based assessment-tasks, including a long essay which acts as preparation for level 3 modules/assessment. Level 3 further develops independence and autonomy, requiring study of core substantive areas in greater depth and context.
Reading lists are provided for all modules which direct students to relevant primary and secondary sources. From level 1, students are encouraged to retrieve these sources for themselves to develop familiarity and skill in the use and identification of resources. Instruction in the use of the University Law Library and the QUB online information system are core elements of the first year induction process. The QUB online information system enables students to communicate with staff and other students by email and gain access to learning and teaching resources (including module syllabi and lecture, tutorial and seminar outlines). The entire LLB learning and teaching process requires regular interaction with QUB online system thus ensuring that students acquire and develop a range of IT skills.

Methods of Assessment

Level 1 – open book exams (Criminal Law, EU Con, EU Internal Market); judgment analysis coursework (Legal Method); advocate general opinion (EU Con, EU IML); written coursework essays (Constitutional Law in Context, Rights & Accountability)
Level 2 – open book exams, Advocate-General opinion (EU Con, EU Internal Market); short coursework essays (Equity)
Level 3 –long coursework essays (Contract, Tort, Contemporary Issues in Property Law)
Cognitive skills in the use of IT are not formally assessed; however the acquisition and development of IT skills are integral to the learning and teaching process underpinning the LLB pathway.

Make constructive use of feedback

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The LLB is designed to foster phased progression in the development of intellectual independence. Level 1 modules introduce students to legal sources and methods of legal argument, with a transitional emphasis on developing critical reasoning and analysis. Level 2 offers students opportunities to develop rigour and precision in doctrinal analysis, through problem and argument based assessment-tasks, including a long essay which acts as preparation for level 3 modules/assessment. Level 3 further develops independence and autonomy, requiring study of core substantive areas in greater depth and context.
Reading lists are provided for all modules which direct students to relevant primary and secondary sources. From level 1, students are encouraged to retrieve these sources for themselves to develop familiarity and skill in the use and identification of resources. Instruction in the use of the University Law Library and the QUB online information system are core elements of the first year induction process. The QUB online information system enables students to communicate with staff and other students by email and gain access to learning and teaching resources (including module syllabi and lecture, tutorial and seminar outlines). The entire LLB learning and teaching process requires regular interaction with QUB online system thus ensuring that students acquire and develop a range of IT skills.

Methods of Assessment

Level 1 – open book exams (Criminal Law, EU Con, EU Internal Market); judgment analysis coursework (Legal Method); advocate general opinion (EU Con, EU IML); written coursework essays (Constitutional Law in Context, Rights & Accountability)
Level 2 – open book exams, Advocate-General opinion (EU Con, EU Internal Market); short coursework essays (Equity)
Level 3 –long coursework essays (Contract, Tort, Contemporary Issues in Property Law)
Cognitive skills in the use of IT are not formally assessed; however the acquisition and development of IT skills are integral to the learning and teaching process underpinning the LLB pathway.

Learning Outcomes: Transferable Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Communicate orally and in writing

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Consistent with the Benchmark Statement for Law, the LLB is designed to ensure that law students acquire skills, attributes and qualities of mind that are readily transferable to a wide range of occupations and careers. Verbal communication skills are developed primarily through small group tutorial and seminar teaching, in particular by means of student presentations; and student and tutor led discussion. Level 1 modules have been designed to encourage transition to the style and practice of teaching by including additional action-focused tasks where students are encouraged to practice communication skills, such as moot court exercises (Legal Method and Skills) and negotiation exercises (Criminal Law). Written communication skills are developed through the programme primarily through essay writing. Coursework requires the development of arguments based on the presentation and/or generation of numerical and statistical information, aid the development of numeracy skills. The process of independent study that underlines the entire learning and teaching process, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on essays, facilitates the development of autonomy and personal skills - particularly the student’s ability to reflect on his/her own work and to accept and provide constructive criticism. Problem-solving and teamwork skills are developed principally through specific problem-based tutorial and seminar exercises and projects that require collaboration amongst teams of students.

The learner also will be introduced to problem solving and information processing strategies, as well as general methodological and theoretical approaches to the study of Politics.

Again in level 1 we offer specific transition-focused opportunities to practice working collaboratively, though the ‘integration week’ programme which features a series of interactive seminars where students work in small teams on introductory tasks and problems. General time-management and intellectual skills are also developed through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB Online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word-processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and teaching process.

Methods of Assessment

The assessment of the majority of key transferable skills forms an integral part of the overall assessment of the degree pathway; however the approach to assessment varies. Written communication skills, problem-solving and intellectual skills are assessment directly throughout the degree programme. Autonomy and personal skills, teamwork and IT skills are generally assessed indirectly through the medium of examinations and coursework. Verbal communication skills are not subject to formal assessment by the school, though formative exercises within tutorials/seminars offer a focused approach to practice

Problem-solve and provide evidenced conclusion, assessing the merits of particular arguments and presenting reasoned choices between alternatives

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Consistent with the Benchmark Statement for Law, the LLB is designed to ensure that law students acquire skills, attributes and qualities of mind that are readily transferable to a wide range of occupations and careers. Verbal communication skills are developed primarily through small group tutorial and seminar teaching, in particular by means of student presentations; and student and tutor led discussion. Level 1 modules have been designed to encourage transition to the style and practice of teaching by including additional action-focused tasks where students are encouraged to practice communication skills, such as moot court exercises (Legal Method and Skills) and negotiation exercises (Criminal Law). Written communication skills are developed through the programme primarily through essay writing. Coursework requires the development of arguments based on the presentation and/or generation of numerical and statistical information, aid the development of numeracy skills. The process of independent study that underlines the entire learning and teaching process, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on essays, facilitates the development of autonomy and personal skills - particularly the student’s ability to reflect on his/her own work and to accept and provide constructive criticism. Problem-solving and teamwork skills are developed principally through specific problem-based tutorial and seminar exercises and projects that require collaboration amongst teams of students.

The learner also will be introduced to problem solving and information processing strategies, as well as general methodological and theoretical approaches to the study of Politics.

Again in level 1 we offer specific transition-focused opportunities to practice working collaboratively, though the ‘integration week’ programme which features a series of interactive seminars where students work in small teams on introductory tasks and problems. General time-management and intellectual skills are also developed through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB Online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word-processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and teaching process.

Methods of Assessment

The assessment of the majority of key transferable skills forms an integral part of the overall assessment of the degree pathway; however the approach to assessment varies. Written communication skills, problem-solving and intellectual skills are assessment directly throughout the degree programme. Autonomy and personal skills, teamwork and IT skills are generally assessed indirectly through the medium of examinations and coursework. Verbal communication skills are not subject to formal assessment by the school, though formative exercises within tutorials/seminars offer a focused approach to practice

Work collaboratively

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Consistent with the Benchmark Statement for Law, the LLB is designed to ensure that law students acquire skills, attributes and qualities of mind that are readily transferable to a wide range of occupations and careers. Verbal communication skills are developed primarily through small group tutorial and seminar teaching, in particular by means of student presentations; and student and tutor led discussion. Level 1 modules have been designed to encourage transition to the style and practice of teaching by including additional action-focused tasks where students are encouraged to practice communication skills, such as moot court exercises (Legal Method and Skills) and negotiation exercises (Criminal Law). Written communication skills are developed through the programme primarily through essay writing. Coursework requires the development of arguments based on the presentation and/or generation of numerical and statistical information, aid the development of numeracy skills. The process of independent study that underlines the entire learning and teaching process, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on essays, facilitates the development of autonomy and personal skills - particularly the student’s ability to reflect on his/her own work and to accept and provide constructive criticism. Problem-solving and teamwork skills are developed principally through specific problem-based tutorial and seminar exercises and projects that require collaboration amongst teams of students.

The learner also will be introduced to problem solving and information processing strategies, as well as general methodological and theoretical approaches to the study of Politics.

Again in level 1 we offer specific transition-focused opportunities to practice working collaboratively, though the ‘integration week’ programme which features a series of interactive seminars where students work in small teams on introductory tasks and problems. General time-management and intellectual skills are also developed through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB Online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word-processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and teaching process.

Methods of Assessment

The assessment of the majority of key transferable skills forms an integral part of the overall assessment of the degree pathway; however the approach to assessment varies. Written communication skills, problem-solving and intellectual skills are assessment directly throughout the degree programme. Autonomy and personal skills, teamwork and IT skills are generally assessed indirectly through the medium of examinations and coursework. Verbal communication skills are not subject to formal assessment by the school, though formative exercises within tutorials/seminars offer a focused approach to practice

Engage with their personal/professional development

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Consistent with the Benchmark Statement for Law, the LLB is designed to ensure that law students acquire skills, attributes and qualities of mind that are readily transferable to a wide range of occupations and careers. Verbal communication skills are developed primarily through small group tutorial and seminar teaching, in particular by means of student presentations; and student and tutor led discussion. Level 1 modules have been designed to encourage transition to the style and practice of teaching by including additional action-focused tasks where students are encouraged to practice communication skills, such as moot court exercises (Legal Method and Skills) and negotiation exercises (Criminal Law). Written communication skills are developed through the programme primarily through essay writing. Coursework requires the development of arguments based on the presentation and/or generation of numerical and statistical information, aid the development of numeracy skills. The process of independent study that underlines the entire learning and teaching process, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on essays, facilitates the development of autonomy and personal skills - particularly the student’s ability to reflect on his/her own work and to accept and provide constructive criticism. Problem-solving and teamwork skills are developed principally through specific problem-based tutorial and seminar exercises and projects that require collaboration amongst teams of students.

The learner also will be introduced to problem solving and information processing strategies, as well as general methodological and theoretical approaches to the study of Politics.

Again in level 1 we offer specific transition-focused opportunities to practice working collaboratively, though the ‘integration week’ programme which features a series of interactive seminars where students work in small teams on introductory tasks and problems. General time-management and intellectual skills are also developed through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB Online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word-processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and teaching process.

Methods of Assessment

The assessment of the majority of key transferable skills forms an integral part of the overall assessment of the degree pathway; however the approach to assessment varies. Written communication skills, problem-solving and intellectual skills are assessment directly throughout the degree programme. Autonomy and personal skills, teamwork and IT skills are generally assessed indirectly through the medium of examinations and coursework. Verbal communication skills are not subject to formal assessment by the school, though formative exercises within tutorials/seminars offer a focused approach to practice

Information Technology

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Consistent with the Benchmark Statement for Law, the LLB is designed to ensure that law students acquire skills, attributes and qualities of mind that are readily transferable to a wide range of occupations and careers. Verbal communication skills are developed primarily through small group tutorial and seminar teaching, in particular by means of student presentations; and student and tutor led discussion. Level 1 modules have been designed to encourage transition to the style and practice of teaching by including additional action-focused tasks where students are encouraged to practice communication skills, such as moot court exercises (Legal Method and Skills) and negotiation exercises (Criminal Law). Written communication skills are developed through the programme primarily through essay writing. Coursework requires the development of arguments based on the presentation and/or generation of numerical and statistical information, aid the development of numeracy skills. The process of independent study that underlines the entire learning and teaching process, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on essays, facilitates the development of autonomy and personal skills - particularly the student’s ability to reflect on his/her own work and to accept and provide constructive criticism. Problem-solving and teamwork skills are developed principally through specific problem-based tutorial and seminar exercises and projects that require collaboration amongst teams of students.

The learner also will be introduced to problem solving and information processing strategies, as well as general methodological and theoretical approaches to the study of Politics.

Again in level 1 we offer specific transition-focused opportunities to practice working collaboratively, though the ‘integration week’ programme which features a series of interactive seminars where students work in small teams on introductory tasks and problems. General time-management and intellectual skills are also developed through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB Online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word-processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and teaching process.

Methods of Assessment

The assessment of the majority of key transferable skills forms an integral part of the overall assessment of the degree pathway; however the approach to assessment varies. Written communication skills, problem-solving and intellectual skills are assessment directly throughout the degree programme. Autonomy and personal skills, teamwork and IT skills are generally assessed indirectly through the medium of examinations and coursework. Verbal communication skills are not subject to formal assessment by the school, though formative exercises within tutorials/seminars offer a focused approach to practice

Work with a range of data, including textual, numerical and statistical

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Consistent with the Benchmark Statement for Law, the LLB is designed to ensure that law students acquire skills, attributes and qualities of mind that are readily transferable to a wide range of occupations and careers. Verbal communication skills are developed primarily through small group tutorial and seminar teaching, in particular by means of student presentations; and student and tutor led discussion. Level 1 modules have been designed to encourage transition to the style and practice of teaching by including additional action-focused tasks where students are encouraged to practice communication skills, such as moot court exercises (Legal Method and Skills) and negotiation exercises (Criminal Law). Written communication skills are developed through the programme primarily through essay writing. Coursework requires the development of arguments based on the presentation and/or generation of numerical and statistical information, aid the development of numeracy skills. The process of independent study that underlines the entire learning and teaching process, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on essays, facilitates the development of autonomy and personal skills - particularly the student’s ability to reflect on his/her own work and to accept and provide constructive criticism. Problem-solving and teamwork skills are developed principally through specific problem-based tutorial and seminar exercises and projects that require collaboration amongst teams of students.

The learner also will be introduced to problem solving and information processing strategies, as well as general methodological and theoretical approaches to the study of Politics.

Again in level 1 we offer specific transition-focused opportunities to practice working collaboratively, though the ‘integration week’ programme which features a series of interactive seminars where students work in small teams on introductory tasks and problems. General time-management and intellectual skills are also developed through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB Online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word-processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and teaching process.

Methods of Assessment

The assessment of the majority of key transferable skills forms an integral part of the overall assessment of the degree pathway; however the approach to assessment varies. Written communication skills, problem-solving and intellectual skills are assessment directly throughout the degree programme. Autonomy and personal skills, teamwork and IT skills are generally assessed indirectly through the medium of examinations and coursework. Verbal communication skills are not subject to formal assessment by the school, though formative exercises within tutorials/seminars offer a focused approach to practice

Listen and respond to written and oral instructions, make effective use of feedback

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Consistent with the Benchmark Statement for Law, the LLB is designed to ensure that law students acquire skills, attributes and qualities of mind that are readily transferable to a wide range of occupations and careers. Verbal communication skills are developed primarily through small group tutorial and seminar teaching, in particular by means of student presentations; and student and tutor led discussion. Level 1 modules have been designed to encourage transition to the style and practice of teaching by including additional action-focused tasks where students are encouraged to practice communication skills, such as moot court exercises (Legal Method and Skills) and negotiation exercises (Criminal Law). Written communication skills are developed through the programme primarily through essay writing. Coursework requires the development of arguments based on the presentation and/or generation of numerical and statistical information, aid the development of numeracy skills. The process of independent study that underlines the entire learning and teaching process, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on essays, facilitates the development of autonomy and personal skills - particularly the student’s ability to reflect on his/her own work and to accept and provide constructive criticism. Problem-solving and teamwork skills are developed principally through specific problem-based tutorial and seminar exercises and projects that require collaboration amongst teams of students.

The learner also will be introduced to problem solving and information processing strategies, as well as general methodological and theoretical approaches to the study of Politics.

Again in level 1 we offer specific transition-focused opportunities to practice working collaboratively, though the ‘integration week’ programme which features a series of interactive seminars where students work in small teams on introductory tasks and problems. General time-management and intellectual skills are also developed through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB Online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word-processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and teaching process.

Methods of Assessment

The assessment of the majority of key transferable skills forms an integral part of the overall assessment of the degree pathway; however the approach to assessment varies. Written communication skills, problem-solving and intellectual skills are assessment directly throughout the degree programme. Autonomy and personal skills, teamwork and IT skills are generally assessed indirectly through the medium of examinations and coursework. Verbal communication skills are not subject to formal assessment by the school, though formative exercises within tutorials/seminars offer a focused approach to practice

Learning Outcomes: Knowledge & Understanding

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the theories, concepts, principles and values of the legal system of Northern Ireland and England and Wales, particularly in the Foundations of Legal Knowledge.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Students’ acquisition of core knowledge is achieved primarily through independent study supported by lectures, tutorials and seminars. Detailed study of legal institutions and politics is embedded in Level 1 and Level 2 modules. While teaching at all levels of the programmes aims to locate legal rules and principles in their broader social context, research-led teaching in level 3 core modules offers very focused opportunities to develop depth of contextual understanding for selected substantive areas in law and politics.

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations and coursework (essays).

Knowledge and understanding of the sources of that law, how it is made and developed; the institutions within which that law is administered and the personnel who practice law.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Students’ acquisition of core knowledge is achieved primarily through independent study supported by lectures, tutorials and seminars. Detailed study of legal institutions and politics is embedded in Level 1 and Level 2 modules. While teaching at all levels of the programmes aims to locate legal rules and principles in their broader social context, research-led teaching in level 3 core modules offers very focused opportunities to develop depth of contextual understanding for selected substantive areas in law and politics.

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations and coursework (essays).

Demonstrate awareness and understanding of principles and values of law and justice, and of ethics

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Students’ acquisition of core knowledge is achieved primarily through independent study supported by lectures, tutorials and seminars. Detailed study of legal institutions and politics is embedded in Level 1 and Level 2 modules. While teaching at all levels of the programmes aims to locate legal rules and principles in their broader social context, research-led teaching in level 3 core modules offers very focused opportunities to develop depth of contextual understanding for selected substantive areas in law and politics.

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations and coursework (essays).

Understanding of the wider social, national and global contexts in which the law and politics operates.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Students’ acquisition of core knowledge is achieved primarily through independent study supported by lectures, tutorials and seminars. Detailed study of legal institutions and politics is embedded in Level 1 and Level 2 modules. While teaching at all levels of the programmes aims to locate legal rules and principles in their broader social context, research-led teaching in level 3 core modules offers very focused opportunities to develop depth of contextual understanding for selected substantive areas in law and politics.

Methods of Assessment

Written examinations and coursework (essays).

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant factual and legal information.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Student’s subject specific skills are developed generally through lectures; tutorials; seminars; directed reading; independent preparation for tutorials and seminars; problem-solving scenarios; student presentations; and student and tutor led discussion. Further opportunities for the development of subject specific skills are offered by the modules that employ additional learning and teaching methods, including: writing essays that encompass a range of primary and secondary material; feedback to individual students on draft essays, moot court exercises, politics simulations/role play and negotiation exercises.

Methods of Assessment

Subject specific skills are assessed through written exams, coursework (essays and problems) and case-study analysis. Some courses employ different methods for assessing these skills including preparing reports.

At level 1, the focus is on transition, helping students to develop critical analysis and synthesis (open book exams in Criminal Law; judgment analysis in Legal method and Skills) and application (exam problem questions in Constitutional Law, Rights & Accountability) and understanding of Politics.

Level 2 particularly focuses on the application of conceptual information to complex problems, with coursework problems in EU Con/EIML and Equity, and exam problems in Land. On Politics the student engage with fundamental political ideologies and thought as well as the EU.

Level 3 module requires students to demonstrate higher levels of synthesis and analysis, and to demonstrate independent thinking.

Analyse, evaluate and interpret information.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Student’s subject specific skills are developed generally through lectures; tutorials; seminars; directed reading; independent preparation for tutorials and seminars; problem-solving scenarios; student presentations; and student and tutor led discussion. Further opportunities for the development of subject specific skills are offered by the modules that employ additional learning and teaching methods, including: writing essays that encompass a range of primary and secondary material; feedback to individual students on draft essays, moot court exercises, politics simulations/role play and negotiation exercises.

Methods of Assessment

Subject specific skills are assessed through written exams, coursework (essays and problems) and case-study analysis. Some courses employ different methods for assessing these skills including preparing reports.

At level 1, the focus is on transition, helping students to develop critical analysis and synthesis (open book exams in Criminal Law; judgment analysis in Legal method and Skills) and application (exam problem questions in Constitutional Law, Rights & Accountability) and understanding of Politics.

Level 2 particularly focuses on the application of conceptual information to complex problems, with coursework problems in EU Con/EIML and Equity, and exam problems in Land. On Politics the student engage with fundamental political ideologies and thought as well as the EU.

Level 3 module requires students to demonstrate higher levels of synthesis and analysis, and to demonstrate independent thinking.

Synthesise information from a variety of sources in order to gain a coherent understanding of legal theory and practice.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Student’s subject specific skills are developed generally through lectures; tutorials; seminars; directed reading; independent preparation for tutorials and seminars; problem-solving scenarios; student presentations; and student and tutor led discussion. Further opportunities for the development of subject specific skills are offered by the modules that employ additional learning and teaching methods, including: writing essays that encompass a range of primary and secondary material; feedback to individual students on draft essays, moot court exercises, politics simulations/role play and negotiation exercises.

Methods of Assessment

Subject specific skills are assessed through written exams, coursework (essays and problems) and case-study analysis. Some courses employ different methods for assessing these skills including preparing reports.

At level 1, the focus is on transition, helping students to develop critical analysis and synthesis (open book exams in Criminal Law; judgment analysis in Legal method and Skills) and application (exam problem questions in Constitutional Law, Rights & Accountability) and understanding of Politics.

Level 2 particularly focuses on the application of conceptual information to complex problems, with coursework problems in EU Con/EIML and Equity, and exam problems in Land. On Politics the student engage with fundamental political ideologies and thought as well as the EU.

Level 3 module requires students to demonstrate higher levels of synthesis and analysis, and to demonstrate independent thinking.

Apply conceptual information to practical legal problems.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Student’s subject specific skills are developed generally through lectures; tutorials; seminars; directed reading; independent preparation for tutorials and seminars; problem-solving scenarios; student presentations; and student and tutor led discussion. Further opportunities for the development of subject specific skills are offered by the modules that employ additional learning and teaching methods, including: writing essays that encompass a range of primary and secondary material; feedback to individual students on draft essays, moot court exercises, politics simulations/role play and negotiation exercises.

Methods of Assessment

Subject specific skills are assessed through written exams, coursework (essays and problems) and case-study analysis. Some courses employ different methods for assessing these skills including preparing reports.

At level 1, the focus is on transition, helping students to develop critical analysis and synthesis (open book exams in Criminal Law; judgment analysis in Legal method and Skills) and application (exam problem questions in Constitutional Law, Rights & Accountability) and understanding of Politics.

Level 2 particularly focuses on the application of conceptual information to complex problems, with coursework problems in EU Con/EIML and Equity, and exam problems in Land. On Politics the student engage with fundamental political ideologies and thought as well as the EU.

Level 3 module requires students to demonstrate higher levels of synthesis and analysis, and to demonstrate independent thinking.

Develop and defend reasoned opinions.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Student’s subject specific skills are developed generally through lectures; tutorials; seminars; directed reading; independent preparation for tutorials and seminars; problem-solving scenarios; student presentations; and student and tutor led discussion. Further opportunities for the development of subject specific skills are offered by the modules that employ additional learning and teaching methods, including: writing essays that encompass a range of primary and secondary material; feedback to individual students on draft essays, moot court exercises, politics simulations/role play and negotiation exercises.

Methods of Assessment

Subject specific skills are assessed through written exams, coursework (essays and problems) and case-study analysis. Some courses employ different methods for assessing these skills including preparing reports.

At level 1, the focus is on transition, helping students to develop critical analysis and synthesis (open book exams in Criminal Law; judgment analysis in Legal method and Skills) and application (exam problem questions in Constitutional Law, Rights & Accountability) and understanding of Politics.

Level 2 particularly focuses on the application of conceptual information to complex problems, with coursework problems in EU Con/EIML and Equity, and exam problems in Land. On Politics the student engage with fundamental political ideologies and thought as well as the EU.

Level 3 module requires students to demonstrate higher levels of synthesis and analysis, and to demonstrate independent thinking.

Recognise potential alternative conclusions for particular situations; provide supporting legal reasoning for each; and identify the strengths and weaknesses of opposing arguments and the opportunities for negotiation.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Student’s subject specific skills are developed generally through lectures; tutorials; seminars; directed reading; independent preparation for tutorials and seminars; problem-solving scenarios; student presentations; and student and tutor led discussion. Further opportunities for the development of subject specific skills are offered by the modules that employ additional learning and teaching methods, including: writing essays that encompass a range of primary and secondary material; feedback to individual students on draft essays, moot court exercises, politics simulations/role play and negotiation exercises.

Methods of Assessment

Subject specific skills are assessed through written exams, coursework (essays and problems) and case-study analysis. Some courses employ different methods for assessing these skills including preparing reports.

At level 1, the focus is on transition, helping students to develop critical analysis and synthesis (open book exams in Criminal Law; judgment analysis in Legal method and Skills) and application (exam problem questions in Constitutional Law, Rights & Accountability) and understanding of Politics.

Level 2 particularly focuses on the application of conceptual information to complex problems, with coursework problems in EU Con/EIML and Equity, and exam problems in Land. On Politics the student engage with fundamental political ideologies and thought as well as the EU.

Level 3 module requires students to demonstrate higher levels of synthesis and analysis, and to demonstrate independent thinking.

Develop and demonstrate independent thinking.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Student’s subject specific skills are developed generally through lectures; tutorials; seminars; directed reading; independent preparation for tutorials and seminars; problem-solving scenarios; student presentations; and student and tutor led discussion. Further opportunities for the development of subject specific skills are offered by the modules that employ additional learning and teaching methods, including: writing essays that encompass a range of primary and secondary material; feedback to individual students on draft essays, moot court exercises, politics simulations/role play and negotiation exercises.

Methods of Assessment

Subject specific skills are assessed through written exams, coursework (essays and problems) and case-study analysis. Some courses employ different methods for assessing these skills including preparing reports.

At level 1, the focus is on transition, helping students to develop critical analysis and synthesis (open book exams in Criminal Law; judgment analysis in Legal method and Skills) and application (exam problem questions in Constitutional Law, Rights & Accountability) and understanding of Politics.

Level 2 particularly focuses on the application of conceptual information to complex problems, with coursework problems in EU Con/EIML and Equity, and exam problems in Land. On Politics the student engage with fundamental political ideologies and thought as well as the EU.

Level 3 module requires students to demonstrate higher levels of synthesis and analysis, and to demonstrate independent thinking.

MODULE INFORMATION

Stages and Modules

Module Title Module Code Level/ stage Credits

Availability

Duration Pre-requisite

Assessment

S1 S2 Core Option Coursework % Practical % Examination %
Constitutional Law in Context LAW1021 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 20% 0% 80%
Rights and Accountability LAW1024 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 0% 0% 100%
Criminal Law LAW1025 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 20% 0% 80%
Perspectives on Politics PAI1007 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Comparative Politics PAI1009 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Legal Methods and Skills LAW1026 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Modern Political Thought PAI2005 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
The Politics of Deeply Divided Societies PAI2011 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
International Relations PAI2017 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Equity LAW2041 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 0% 0% 100%
European Constitutional Law LAW2050 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Land Law LAW2045 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 0% 0% 100%
European Internal Market Law LAW2053 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Security and Terrorism PAI2055 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
International Organisations PAI2056 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Evidence LAW3002 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 0% 0% 100%
The Politics of Irish Literature PAI3005 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Contemporary Political Philosophy PAI3025 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Gender and Politics PAI3008 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Earth, Energy, Ethics and Economy: The Politics of Unsustainability PAI3026 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
European Cultural Identities PAI3027 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Contract LAW3044 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Contemporary Issues in Property Law LAW3046 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Torts LAW3045 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Northern Ireland: A Case Study PAI3064 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
US Foreign Policy PAI3038 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Arms Control PAI3039 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Global Pol. Econ. of Energy PAI3012 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%

Notes

Students will be notified each academic year of the optional modules being offered in the following academic year. Students are advised that not all optional modules will necessarily be offered in each academic year. Also, the delivery of a module may be subject to a minimum number of enrolments as well as unforeseen circumstances (e.g. illness of a member of staff). The range and content of optional modules will change over time as degree programmes develop and students’ choice of optional modules may also be limited due to timetabling constraints.