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Master of Jurisprudence (T)

Academic Year 2020/21

A programme specification is required for any programme on which a student may be registered. All programmes of the University are subject to the University's Quality Assurance and Enhancement processes as set out in the DASA Policies and Procedures Manual.

Programme Title

Master of Jurisprudence (T)

Final Award
(exit route if applicable for Postgraduate Taught Programmes)

Master of Jurisprudence

Programme Code

LAW-MJU

UCAS Code

HECoS Code

100485

ATAS Clearance Required

No

Health Check Required

No

Portfolio Required

Interview Required

Mode of Study

Full Time

Type of Programme

Postgraduate

Length of Programme

2 Academic Year(s)

Total Credits for Programme

360

Exit Awards available

INSTITUTE INFORMATION

Teaching Institution

Queen's University Belfast

School/Department

Law

Quality Code
https://www.qaa.ac.uk/quality-code

Higher Education Credit Framework for England
https://www.qaa.ac.uk/quality-code/higher-education-credit-framework-for-england

Level 7

Subject Benchmark Statements
https://www.qaa.ac.uk/quality-code/subject-benchmark-statements

The Frameworks for Higher Education Qualifications of UK Degree-Awarding Bodies
https://www.qaa.ac.uk/docs/qaa/quality-code/qualifications-frameworks.pdf

Law (2019)

Accreditations (PSRB)

Joint Academic Stage Board (Solicitors Regulation Authority and Bar Standards Board)

Date of most recent Accreditation Visit 01-06-20

REGULATION INFORMATION

Does the Programme have any approved exemptions from the University General Regulations
(Please see General Regulations)

Programme Specific Regulations

Academic Progression
Students are required to pass 180 CATS at Level 1 and 180 CATS at Level 2.

The Master Jurisprudence (Taught) is an exit award only. It is awarded to students who have successfully completed taught modules worth 360 credits. Students are not required to pass the differentiation component of LAW8701 in order to be awarded a Masters Jurisprudence (taught).

Students with protected characteristics

Are students subject to Fitness to Practise Regulations

(Please see General Regulations)

No

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF PROGRAMME

The programme is a structured master’s that also provides students with a systematic understanding of the fundamental doctrines and principles underpinning the law in Northern Ireland and England and Wales. The programme prepares graduates who wish to enter the legal profession.

To this end, the programme presents a range of foundation subjects in law at Level 7 in year one. From the Summer of Year One through to the end of Year Two, students study modules on Critical Literature Skills, Research Methodologies, Professional Ethics and Design, European Law, Company Law and International Trade and Property Law and Equity.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Learning Outcomes: Cognitive Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Identify specialist and field wide knowledge sources and data.

Manage creatively field-wide knowledge in an independent manner

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Cognitive skills will be taught through small group seminars. Student participation will be essential for these. Skills will be developed and enhanced through independent study and through individual and group interactions with staff members in both structured and unstructured formats.

Students will receive feedback in the seminars on the accuracy of their arguments and legal reasoning. This enables students to evaluate their own knowledge and understanding, as well as that of others. Following this, students will engage in further independent research and advanced study, often in coordination with an assigned supervisor or a part of a peer group team

Methods of Assessment

Many of the methods of assessment will be unique to this programme and will involve the students undertaking an array of tasks:

a. There will be several oral components that require students to draw upon knowledge from across the field of law and construct independent and creative arguments.

b. Written assignments are equally innovative and will assist students in developing a wide array of cognitive abilities.

c. Autonomy is a key feature of our proposed approach to assessment. Students will be expected to identify their preferred areas of research, to select their essay topics, and to carry out independent investigation in furtherance of their tasks. While demanding, this approach is in keeping with the expectations of a master’s programme, ensuring that graduates enjoy an array of opportunities to:

i. Think independently
ii. Develop original contributions in pursuit of their degree.

d. All modules have feedback opportunities aimed at enhancing students' cognitive skills. Level 8 modules will involve formative assessment opportunities, including revise and resubmit opportunities on main written assessments.

Identify, understand, interpret and evaluate relevant subject-specific arguments made by others, construct independent arguments and new knowledge through original research and advanced scholarship

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Cognitive skills will be taught through small group seminars. Student participation will be essential for these. Skills will be developed and enhanced through independent study and through individual and group interactions with staff members in both structured and unstructured formats.

Students will receive feedback in the seminars on the accuracy of their arguments and legal reasoning. This enables students to evaluate their own knowledge and understanding, as well as that of others. Following this students will engage in further independent research and advanced study, often in coordination with an assigned supervisor or a part of a peer group team

Methods of Assessment

Many of the methods of assessment will be unique to this programme and will involve the students undertaking an array of tasks:

a. There will be several oral components that require students to draw upon knowledge from across the field of law and construct independent and creative arguments.

b. Written assignments are equally innovative and will assist students in developing a wide array of cognitive abilities.

c. Autonomy is a key feature of our proposed approach to assessment. Students will be expected to identify their preferred areas of research, to select their essay topics, and to carry out independent investigation in furtherance of their tasks. While demanding, this approach is in keeping with the expectations of a master’s programme, ensuring that graduates enjoy an array of opportunities to:

i. Think independently
ii. Develop original contributions in pursuit of their degree.
d. All modules have feedback opportunities aimed at enhancing students' cognitive skills. Level 8 modules will involve formative assessment opportunities, including revise and resubmit opportunities on main written assessments.

Think critically and construct their own positions in relation to existing and ongoing debates in the field

Conceptualise, design and implement a project for the generation of new knowledge, applications or understanding at the forefront of the discipline, and to adjust the project design in the light of critical feedback and or new developments.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Cognitive skills will be taught through small group seminars. Student participation will be essential for these. Skills will be developed and enhanced through independent study and through individual and group interactions with staff members in both structured and unstructured formats.

Students will receive feedback in the seminars on the accuracy of their arguments and legal reasoning. This enables students to evaluate their own knowledge and understanding, as well as that of others. Following this students will engage in further independent research and advanced study, often in coordination with an assigned supervisor or a part of a peer group team.

Methods of Assessment

Many of the methods of assessment will be unique to this programme and will involve the students undertaking an array of tasks:

a. There will be several oral components that require students to draw upon knowledge from across the field of law and construct independent and creative arguments.

b. Written assignments are equally innovative and will assist students in developing a wide array of cognitive abilities.

c. Autonomy is a key feature of our proposed approach to assessment. Students will be expected to identify their preferred areas of research, to select their essay topics, and to carry out independent investigation in furtherance of their tasks. While demanding, this approach is in keeping with the expectations of a master’s programme, ensuring that graduates enjoy an array of opportunities to:
i. Think independently
ii. Develop original contributions in pursuit of their degree.
d. All modules have feedback opportunities aimed at enhancing students' cognitive skills. Level 8 modules will involve formative assessment opportunities, including revise and resubmit opportunities on main written assessments.

Organise large amounts of complex and sometimes incomplete information and identify, evaluate and analyse the key features of the material; use evidence to develop a clear and logical argument and use information effectively in a direct and appropriate way

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Cognitive skills will be taught through small group seminars. Student participation will be essential for these. Skills will be developed and enhanced through independent study and through individual and group interactions with staff members in both structured and unstructured formats.

Students will receive feedback in the seminars on the accuracy of their arguments and legal reasoning. This enables students to evaluate their own knowledge and understanding, as well as that of others. Following this students will engage in further independent research and advanced study, often in coordination with an assigned supervisor or a part of a peer group team.

Methods of Assessment

Many of the methods of assessment will be unique to this programme and will involve the students undertaking an array of tasks:

a. There will be several oral components that require students to draw upon knowledge from across the field of law and construct independent and creative arguments.

b. Written assignments are equally innovative and will assist students in developing a wide array of cognitive abilities.

c. Autonomy is a key feature of our proposed approach to assessment. Students will be expected to identify their preferred areas of research, to select their essay topics, and to carry out independent investigation in furtherance of their tasks. While demanding, this approach is in keeping with the expectations of a master’s programme, ensuring that graduates enjoy an array of opportunities to:

i. Think independently
ii. Develop original contributions in pursuit of their degree.
d. All modules have feedback opportunities aimed at enhancing students' cognitive skills. Level 8 modules will involve formative assessment opportunities, including revise and resubmit opportunities on main written assessments.

Learning Outcomes: Transferable Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Inform in oral delivery, persuade and convince both specialist and non-specialist audiences. Convey complex information and ideas clearly and succinctly

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Verbal communication skills are developed through small group seminar teaching, in particular by means of formulating and responding to argument on complex legal hypotheticals. Written communication skills are developed through research papers.

The process of independent study that underlines the entire programme of study, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on research papers, facilitate the development of intellectual autonomy, self-direction and personal skills.

Integrated research methodology and research ethics training is provided in the context of students developing independently produced work of a publishable standard. Peer review comments and supervisory input will enable students to reflect critically on their progress and development needs.

Problem-solving and teamwork skills are also developed through specific problem-based seminar exercises and projects that require independent research and collaboration amongst groups of students. General time-management and intellectual skills are augmented through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and developmental experience.

Methods of Assessment

The assessments will place students in unfamiliar and unpredictable settings and require that they adapt to these.

a. They will be expected to draw upon the knowledge of law that has been developed throughout their modules and to be able to mobilise that knowledge on demand. Students will also be assessed in terms of how they react to a lack of knowledge on certain matters and how they react to the demands of the remaining situation.

b. Reflective and advocacy essays for EU Law, Constitutional and Administrative Law, and Research Design will provide students with opportunity to reflect independently on the progress they are making and to identify their career development needs.

c. This approach will ensure that students can thrive in a professional legal setting where demands are ad hoc and require much in the way of adaptability. As adaptability matures, students expand the opportunities before them, learning to comfortably navigate uncertain situations.

d. The ability to handle uncertain situations is critical for success both in legal practice and in legal academia and will be honed via:

i. Advocacy exercises,
ii. Vivas,
iii. Oral exams

Exercise personal responsibility and autonomous initiative in complex and unpredictable situations, in professional or equivalent environments. Recognise the importance of acting within appropriate governance structures while being sensitive to the demands of personal and professional responsibility

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Verbal communication skills are developed through small group seminar teaching, in particular by means of formulating and responding to argument on complex legal hypotheticals. Written communication skills are developed through research papers.
The process of independent study that underlines the entire programme of study, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on research papers, facilitate the development of intellectual autonomy, self-direction and personal skills.

Integrated research methodology and research ethics training is provided in the context of students developing independently produced work of a publishable standard. Peer review comments and supervisory input will enable students to reflect critically on their progress and development needs.

Problem-solving and teamwork skills are also developed through specific problem-based seminar exercises and projects that require independent research and collaboration amongst groups of students. General time-management and intellectual skills are augmented through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and developmental experience.

Methods of Assessment

The assessments will place students in unfamiliar and unpredictable settings and require that they adapt to these.

a. They will be expected to draw upon the knowledge of law that has been developed throughout their modules and to be able to mobilise that knowledge on demand. Students will also be assessed in terms of how they react to a lack of knowledge on certain matters and how they react to the demands of the remaining situation.

b. Reflective and advocacy essays for EU Law, Constitutional and Administrative Law, and Research Design will provide students with opportunity to reflect independently on the progress they are making and to identify their career development needs.

c. This approach will ensure that students can thrive in a professional legal setting where demands are ad hoc and require much in the way of adaptability. As adaptability matures, students expand the opportunities before them, learning to comfortably navigate uncertain situations.

d. The ability to handle uncertain situations is critical for success both in legal practice and in legal academia and will be honed via:

i. Advocacy exercises,
ii. Vivas,
iii. Oral exams

e. Learning and developing from feedback is key. Students will be expected to participate in formative assessments aimed at this skill.

Use information and communication technologies effectively and creatively. Reflect independently on their progress and identify and act upon their own development needs with respect to life-long learning and career development

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Verbal communication skills are developed through small group seminar teaching, in particular by means of formulating and responding to argument on complex legal hypotheticals. Written communication skills are developed through research papers.

The process of independent study that underlines the entire programme of study, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on research papers, facilitate the development of intellectual autonomy, self-direction and personal skills.

Integrated research methodology and research ethics training is provided in the context of students developing independently produced work of a publishable standard. Peer review comments and supervisory input will enable students to reflect critically on their progress and development needs.

Problem-solving and teamwork skills are also developed through specific problem-based seminar exercises and projects that require independent research and collaboration amongst groups of students. General time-management and intellectual skills are augmented through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and developmental experience.

Methods of Assessment

The assessments will place students in unfamiliar and unpredictable settings and require that they adapt to these.

a. They will be expected to draw upon the knowledge of law that has been developed throughout their modules and to be able to mobilise that knowledge on demand. Students will also be assessed in terms of how they react to a lack of knowledge on certain matters and how they react to the demands of the remaining situation.

b. Reflective and advocacy essays for EU Law, Constitutional and Administrative Law, and Research Design will provide students with opportunity to reflect independently on the progress they are making and to identify their career development needs.


c. This approach will ensure that students can thrive in a professional legal setting where demands are ad hoc and require much in the way of adaptability. As adaptability matures, students expand the opportunities before them, learning to comfortably navigate uncertain situations.

d. The ability to handle uncertain situations is critical for success both in legal practice and in legal academia and will be honed via:

i. Advocacy exercises,
ii. Vivas,
iii. Oral exams

Identify ethical demands and conflicts of interest and act in accordance with established codes of professional conduct

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Verbal communication skills are developed through small group seminar teaching, in particular by means of formulating and responding to argument on complex legal hypotheticals. Written communication skills are developed through research papers,

The process of independent study that underlines the entire programme of study, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on research papers, facilitate the development of intellectual autonomy, self-direction and personal skills.

Integrated research methodology and research ethics training is provided in the context of students developing independently produced work of a publishable standard. Peer review comments and supervisory input will enable students to reflect critically on their progress and development needs.

Problem-solving and teamwork skills are also developed through specific problem-based seminar exercises and projects that require independent research and collaboration amongst groups of students. General time-management and intellectual skills are augmented through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and developmental experience.

Methods of Assessment

The assessments will place students in unfamiliar and unpredictable settings and require that they adapt to these.

a. They will be expected to draw upon the knowledge of law that has been developed throughout their modules and to be able to mobilise that knowledge on demand. Students will also be assessed in terms of how they react to a lack of knowledge on certain matters and how they react to the demands of the remaining situation.

b. Reflective and advocacy essays for EU Law, Constitutional and Administrative Law, and Research Design will provide students with opportunity to reflect independently on the progress they are making and to identify their career development needs.

c. This approach will ensure that students can thrive in a professional legal setting where demands are ad hoc and require much in the way of adaptability. As adaptability matures, students expand the opportunities before them, learning to comfortably navigate uncertain situations.

d. The ability to handle uncertain situations is critical for success both in legal practice and in legal academia and will be honed via:

i. Advocacy exercises,
ii. Vivas,
iii. Oral exams

Provide and respond effectively to peer review and feedback

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Verbal communication skills are developed through small group seminar teaching, in particular by means of formulating and responding to argument on complex legal hypotheticals. Written communication skills are developed through research papers.

The process of independent study that underlines the entire programme of study, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on research papers, facilitate the development of intellectual autonomy, self-direction and personal skills.

Integrated research methodology and research ethics training is provided in the context of students developing independently produced work of a publishable standard. Peer review comments and supervisory input will enable students to reflect critically on their progress and development needs.

Problem-solving and teamwork skills are also developed through specific problem-based seminar exercises and projects that require independent research and collaboration amongst groups of students. General time-management and intellectual skills are augmented through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and developmental experience.

Methods of Assessment

The assessments will place students in unfamiliar and unpredictable settings and require that they adapt to these.

a. They will be expected to draw upon the knowledge of law that has been developed throughout their modules and to be able to mobilise that knowledge on demand. Students will also be assessed in terms of how they react to a lack of knowledge on certain matters and how they react to the demands of the remaining situation.
b. Reflective and advocacy essays for EU Law, Constitutional and Administrative Law, and Research Design will provide students with opportunity to reflect independently on the progress they are making and to identify their career development needs.

c. This approach will ensure that students can thrive in a professional legal setting where demands are ad hoc and require much in the way of adaptability. As adaptability matures, students expand the opportunities before them, learning to comfortably navigate uncertain situations.

d. The ability to handle uncertain situations is critical for success both in legal practice and in legal academia and will be honed via:

i. Advocacy exercises,
ii. Vivas,
iii. Oral exams

e. Learning and developing from feedback is key. Students will be expected to participate in formative assessments aimed at this skill.

Think and argue creatively, in novel and enterprising ways, to display originality of thought and argument and clearly support arguments in innovative ways; Produce work of publishable standard

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Verbal communication skills are developed through small group seminar teaching, in particular by means of formulating and responding to argument on complex legal hypotheticals. Written communication skills are developed through research papers,

The process of independent study that underlines the entire programme of study, coupled with guidance and individual feedback on research papers, facilitate the development of intellectual autonomy, self-direction and personal skills.

Integrated research methodology and research ethics training is provided in the context of students developing independently produced work of a publishable standard. Peer review comments and supervisory input will enable students to reflect critically on their progress and development needs.

Problem-solving and teamwork skills are also developed through specific problem-based seminar exercises and projects that require independent research and collaboration amongst groups of students. General time-management and intellectual skills are augmented through the above learning and teaching methods. Use of the internet, QUB online information system (including information retrieval, email communication and document exchange) and word processing are fundamental elements of the entire learning and developmental experience

Methods of Assessment

The assessments will place students in unfamiliar and unpredictable settings and require that they adapt to these.

a. They will be expected to draw upon the knowledge of law that has been developed throughout their modules and to be able to mobilise that knowledge on demand. Students will also be assessed in terms of how they react to a lack of knowledge on certain matters and how they react to the demands of the remaining situation.

b. Reflective and advocacy essays for EU Law, Constitutional and Administrative Law, and Research Design will provide students with opportunity to reflect independently on the progress they are making and to identify their career development needs.

c. This approach will ensure that students can thrive in a professional legal setting where demands are ad hoc and require much in the way of adaptability. As adaptability matures, students expand the opportunities before them, learning to comfortably navigate uncertain situations.

d. The ability to handle uncertain situations is critical for success both in legal practice and in legal academia and will be honed via:

i. Advocacy exercises,
ii. Vivas,
iii. Oral exams

Learning Outcomes: Knowledge & Understanding

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Understand systematically the principal features of legal systems and fundamental legal doctrines such as the rule of law and legal pluralism; Understand the legal institutions of the UK and elsewhere

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Students will be taught as a single group and will receive two hours per module of teaching delivery per week in a single session.

Knowledge will be frontloaded through module teaching, providing students with a platform from which they will develop their own independent and original research based arguments and strategies for addressing issues of law and practice in a global context.

Methods of Assessment

a. Throughout the programme, methods of assessment will require students to:

i. Apply legal rules within context
ii. To explain to the actor(s) why those rules apply as they do
iii. To explain whether the rules originate in the UK and/or in Europe and further afield.

The students will also be required to explain matters:
i. Related to the workings of the courts
ii. Whether the actors have other remedies open to them, such as alternative dispute resolution.

Throughout, searching questions will be posed so as to test the depth of knowledge and understanding.

b. A comprehensive understanding of the workings of the legal system in the UK and Europe is necessary to prepare students to pursue qualification. Original research in law is also dependent upon a thorough grounding in comparative legal systems. This foundation will be developed throughout the programme the variety of methods we have designed will prove useful.

c. Throughout the programme, though primarily beginning in Year 2, students will be expected to think originally and creatively about research in law.

Understand, and be able to criticise, the influence that European and international factors, as well as globalisation, have on the UK and other legal systems. Understand conceptually and have a critical awareness of the context (historical, political, policy, etc) in which law operates

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Students will be taught as a single group and will receive two hours per module of teaching delivery per week in a single session.

Knowledge will be frontloaded through module teaching, providing students with a platform from which they will develop their own independent and original research based arguments and strategies for addressing issues of law and practice in a global context.

Methods of Assessment

a. Throughout the programme, methods of assessment will require students to:
i. Apply legal rules within context
ii. To explain to the actor(s) why those rules apply as they do
iii. To explain whether the rules originate in the UK and/or in Europe and further afield

The students will also be required to explain matters:
i. Related to the workings of the courts
ii. Whether the actors have other remedies open to them, such as alternative dispute resolution.


Throughout, searching questions will be posed so as to test the depth of knowledge and understanding.

b. A comprehensive understanding of the workings of the legal system in the UK and Europe is necessary to prepare students to pursue qualification. Original research in law is also dependent upon a thorough grounding in comparative legal systems. This foundation will be developed throughout the programme, the variety of methods we have designed will prove useful

c. Throughout the programme, though primarily beginning in Year 2, students will be expected to think originally and creatively about research in law.

Understand conceptually and have a critical awareness of the ethical context of lawyering and the rules of professional conduct. Understand legal process and the role of lawyers and others within it

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Students will be taught as a single group and will receive two hours per module of teaching delivery per week in a single session.

Knowledge will be frontloaded through module teaching, providing students with a platform from which they will develop their own independent and original research based arguments and strategies for addressing issues of law and practice in a global context.

Methods of Assessment

a. Throughout the programme, methods of assessment will require students to:
i. Apply legal rules within context
ii. To explain to the actor(s) why those rules apply as they do
iii. To explain whether the rules originate in the UK and/or in Europe and further afield

The students will also be required to explain matters:
i. Related to the workings of the courts
ii. Whether the actors have other remedies open to them, such as alternative dispute resolution.

Throughout, searching questions will be posed so as to test the depth of knowledge and understanding.

b. A comprehensive understanding of the workings of the legal system in the UK and Europe is necessary to prepare students to pursue qualification. Original research in law is also dependent upon a thorough grounding in comparative legal systems. This foundation will be developed throughout the programme, the variety of methods we have designed will prove useful.

c. Throughout the programme, though primarily beginning in Year 2, students will be expected to think originally and creatively about research in law.

Understand of the distinction between law and fact; understand legal precedent and its role in legal argumentation

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Students will be taught as a single group and will receive two hours per module of teaching delivery per week in a single session.

Knowledge will be frontloaded through module teaching, providing students with a platform from which they will develop their own independent and original research based arguments and strategies for addressing issues of law and practice in a global context.

Methods of Assessment

a. Throughout the programme, methods of assessment will require students to:
i. Apply legal rules within context
ii. To explain to the actor(s) why those rules apply as they do
iii. To explain whether the rules originate in the UK and/or in Europe and further afield

The students will also be required to explain matters:
i. Related to the workings of the courts
ii. Whether the actors have other remedies open to them, such as alternative dispute resolution.

Throughout, searching questions will be posed so as to test the depth of knowledge and understanding.

b. A comprehensive understanding of the workings of the legal system in the UK and Europe is necessary to prepare students to pursue qualification. Original research in law is also dependent upon a thorough grounding in comparative legal systems. This foundation will be developed throughout the programme, the variety of methods we have designed will prove useful.

c. Throughout the programme, though primarily beginning in Year 2, students will be expected to think originally and creatively about research in law.

Understand of legislation and the nature of legislative drafting

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Students will be taught as a single group and will receive two hours per module of teaching delivery per week in a single session.

Knowledge will be frontloaded through module teaching, providing students with a platform from which they will develop their own independent and original research based arguments and strategies for addressing issues of law and practice in a global context.

Methods of Assessment

a. Throughout the programme, methods of assessment will require students to:
i. Apply legal rules within context
ii. To explain to the actor(s) why those rules apply as they do
iii. To explain whether the rules originate in the UK and/or in Europe and further afield

The students will also be required to explain matters:
i. Related to the workings of the courts
ii. Whether the actors have other remedies open to them, such as alternative dispute resolution.

Throughout, searching questions will be posed so as to test the depth of knowledge and understanding.

b. A comprehensive understanding of the workings of the legal system in the UK and Europe is necessary to prepare students to pursue qualification. Original research in law is also dependent upon a thorough grounding in comparative legal systems. This foundation will be developed throughout the programme, the variety of methods we have designed will prove useful.

c. Throughout the programme, though primarily beginning in Year 2, students will be expected to think originally and creatively about research in law..

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Undertake original research and development in a legal context at an advanced level. Judge critically the merits of different methodologies, make reasoned choice between different positions and approaches

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

In addition to the teaching methods noted under Knowledge and Understanding, subject-specific skills may be taught by way of field trips to various legal institutions, group work to learn how to operate as a legal team and mooting exercises, which teach advocacy skills

Methods of Assessment

Each module is designed with a focus on research.

a. In practical terms, this means that topical legal problems will inform much of the teaching, providing students with opportunity to reflect on both the applicable rules of law as well as innovative strategies for resolving these problems. Placing material in its procedural and substantive setting will ensure that students:
i. Understand law in its context
ii. Are equipped with the confidence to engage in original thinking around key issues

b. Several assessment methods spread across the three years facilitate this goal including:
i. The drafting of case notes
ii. The preparation of a memorandum
iii. The articulation of appellate briefs
iv. The composition of a judgment

Each task will ensure that students are well versed in debates specific to foundational legal subjects as well as the operation of legal systems more widely.

c. These assessments will also prepare students to conceptualise advanced legal arguments in a creative and original manner.

Synthesise and identify central issues from a large amount of complex legal information. Use, present and critically evaluate information provided in numerical or statistical form when required

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

In addition to the teaching methods noted under Knowledge and Understanding, subject-specific skills may be taught by way of field trips to various legal institutions, group work to learn how to operate as a legal team and mooting exercises, which teach advocacy skills

Methods of Assessment

Each module is designed with a focus on research.

a. In practical terms, this means that topical legal problems will inform much of the teaching, providing students with opportunity to reflect on both the applicable rules of law as well as innovative strategies for resolving these problems. Placing material in its procedural and substantive setting will ensure that students:
i. Understand law in its context
ii. Are equipped with the confidence to engage in original thinking around key issues
b. Several assessment methods spread across the three years facilitate this goal including:
i. The drafting of case notes
ii. The preparation of a memorandum
iii. The articulation of appellate briefs
iv. The composition of a judgment

Each task will ensure that students are well versed in debates specific to foundational legal subjects as well as the operation of legal systems more widely.
c. These assessments will also prepare students to conceptualise advanced legal arguments in a creative and original manner.

Engage in oral and written legal argument at advanced level

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

In addition to the teaching methods noted under Knowledge and Understanding, subject-specific skills may be taught by way of field trips to various legal institutions, group work to learn how to operate as a legal team and mooting exercises, which teach advocacy skills

Methods of Assessment

Each module is designed with a focus on research.
a. In practical terms, this means that topical legal problems will inform much of the teaching, providing students with opportunity to reflect on both the applicable rules of law as well as innovative strategies for resolving these problems. Placing material in its procedural and substantive setting will ensure that students:
i. Understand law in its context
ii. Are equipped with the confidence to engage in original thinking around key issues
b. Several assessment methods spread across the three years facilitate this goal including:
i. The drafting of case notes
ii. The preparation of a memorandum
iii. The articulation of appellate briefs
iv. The composition of a judgment

Each task will ensure that students are well versed in debates specific to foundational legal subjects as well as the operation of legal systems more widely.
c. These assessments will also prepare students to conceptualise advanced legal arguments in a creative and original manner.

Understand the dynamics involved in successful team work in a legal context

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

In addition to the teaching methods noted under Knowledge and Understanding, subject-specific skills may be taught by way of field trips to various legal institutions, group work to learn how to operate as a legal team and mooting exercises, which teach advocacy skills

Methods of Assessment

Each module is designed with a focus on research.
a. In practical terms, this means that topical legal problems will inform much of the teaching, providing students with opportunity to reflect on both the applicable rules of law as well as innovative strategies for resolving these problems. Placing material in its procedural and substantive setting will ensure that students:
i. Understand law in its context
ii. Are equipped with the confidence to engage in original thinking around key issues
b. Several assessment methods spread across the three years facilitate this goal including:
i. The drafting of case notes
ii. The preparation of a memorandum
iii. The articulation of appellate briefs
iv. The composition of a judgment

Each task will ensure that students are well versed in debates specific to foundational legal subjects as well as the operation of legal systems more widely.
c. These assessments will also prepare students to conceptualise advanced legal arguments in a creative and original manner.

Work independently and in a supervisory relationship to problem solve issues relating to various areas of law and legal research

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

In addition to the teaching methods noted under Knowledge and Understanding, subject-specific skills may be taught by way of field trips to various legal institutions, group work to learn how to operate as a legal team and mooting exercises, which teach advocacy skills

Methods of Assessment

Each module is designed with a focus on research.
a. In practical terms, this means that topical legal problems will inform much of the teaching, providing students with opportunity to reflect on both the applicable rules of law as well as innovative strategies for resolving these problems. Placing material in its procedural and substantive setting will ensure that students:
i. Understand law in its context
ii. Are equipped with the confidence to engage in original thinking around key issues
b. Several assessment methods spread across the three years facilitate this goal including:
i. The drafting of case notes
ii. The preparation of a memorandum
iii. The articulation of appellate briefs
iv. The composition of a judgment
Each task will ensure that students are well versed in debates specific to foundational legal subjects as well as the operation of legal systems more widely.
c. These assessments will also prepare students to conceptualise advanced legal arguments in a creative and original manner.

MODULE INFORMATION

Programme Requirements

Module Title

Module Code

Level/ stage

Credits

Availability

Duration

Pre-requisite

 

Assessment

 

 

 

 

S1

S2

 

 

Core

Option

Coursework %

Practical %

Examination %

Contract Law (MLaw)

LAW7909

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Evidence (MLaw)

LAW7912

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Torts (MLaw)

LAW7908

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Constitutional Law in Context (MLaw)

LAW7903

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Rights and Accountability (MLaw)

LAW7905

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Criminal Law (MLaw)

LAW7906

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Legal Methods and Skills (MLaw)

LAW7901

1

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Critical Research Skills

LAW8700

1

40

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Research Methodologies Professional Ethics and Design

LAW8701

2

60

YES

YES

36 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

European Law, Company Law and International Trade

LAW8702

2

60

YES

YES

36 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Property Law and Equity

LAW8703

2

60

YES

YES

36 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Notes