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BA Anthropology and International Relations

Academic Year 2020/21

A programme specification is required for any programme on which a student may be registered. All programmes of the University are subject to the University's Quality Assurance processes. All degrees are awarded by Queen's University Belfast.

Programme Title BA Anthropology and International Relations Final Award
(exit route if applicable for Postgraduate Taught Programmes)
Bachelor of Arts
Programme Code ANT-BA-JS UCAS Code HECoS Code 100436 - Anthropology - 50
100490 - International relations - 50
ATAS Clearance Required No
Mode of Study Full Time
Type of Programme Joint Honours Single Length of Programme 3 Academic Year(s) Total Credits for Programme 360
Exit Awards available

INSTITUTE INFORMATION

Teaching Institution

Queen's University Belfast

School/Department

History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics

Quality Code
https://www.qaa.ac.uk/quality-code

Higher Education Credit Framework for England
https://www.qaa.ac.uk/quality-code/higher-education-credit-framework-for-england

Level 6

Subject Benchmark Statements
https://www.qaa.ac.uk/quality-code/subject-benchmark-statements

The Frameworks for Higher Education Qualifications of UK Degree-Awarding Bodies
https://www.qaa.ac.uk/docs/qaa/quality-code/qualifications-frameworks.pdf

Anthropology (2015)

Accreditations (PSRB)

REGULATION INFORMATION

Does the Programme have any approved exemptions from the University General Regulations
(Please see General Regulations)

N/A

Programme Specific Regulations

Each level must include 60 CATS in Anthropology and 60 CATS in International Relations.

Transferring from Single to Joint Honours:
On completing Level 1 a Single Honours student in either of Anthropology or International Relations who has completed 40 CATS at Level 1 in the other subject and has achieved an average mark across the 40 CATS of 60 or above may be admitted to this Joint Honours Programme subject to having obtained the approval of the Adviser of Studies in the subject in which they have only 40 CATS.

Students with protected characteristics

N/A

Are students subject to Fitness to Practise Regulations

(Please see General Regulations)

No

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF PROGRAMME

The Joint Honours Programme in Anthropology and International Relations is designed to provide students with:
• an intellectual training in the separate disciplines of International Relations and Anthropology which, while discrete subjects, are also complementary and mutually enriching;
• a discipline-specific perspective from which students acquire knowledge and understanding of international affairs and conflict situations in their political, historical, cultural, economic and legal dimensions, a familiarity with debates surrounding culture and identity, both individual and communal, and skills in synthesising and developing ideas and arguments from diverse literary and other contemporary sources;
• a range of skills which together foster the ability to practise self-motivated learning and increase the capacity to undertake independent learning in a progressive way.
Together, these subjects together equip individuals with the ability to:
• think critically, process and understand complex information;
• evaluate primary and secondary sources;
• interpret a variety of types of data and information;
• pursue independent learning;
• work well in groups and formulate arguments.
Furthermore, students benefit from a multi-disciplinary education which gives them a large skill set and opens a wide range of career options following graduation.

The curricula will be delivered in accordance with the national International Relations and Anthropology benchmarking statements, in which students are introduced to core concepts and debates in International Relations and the study of conflict, as well as to the particular European experience of regional integration; and in which Social Anthropology explores the nature of complexity and richness of cultural diversity, providing a knowledge of the values, ethics and traditions of human social worlds through voices and representations as illustrated in theory and ethnography.

More generally, the Joint Honours Programme in Anthropology and International Relations aims:
• to attract students from local, national, and international contexts, through a variety of entry routes, and then provide and deliver the best possible learning and teaching experience, in an environment of equality, tolerance, and mutual respect;
• to provide students with the necessary intellectual, practical, and key skills to enable them to develop as independent, reflective lifelong learners and able employees;
• to develop a broad context for future employment, in which graduates appreciate the continuing value of an education in these two disciplines.
The programme will thereby foster an atmosphere of intellectual inquiry in each discipline, by offering modules which encourage a stimulating interchange of ideas.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Learning Outcomes: Cognitive Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

understand the general methodological and theoretical approaches of the disciplines as well as their basic history. This includes knowledge of their specific concepts, issues and vocabulary;

express arguments and positions in oral and written form;

respond to, and differentiate between, different ideological and theoretical positions;

analyse and interpret material from different geographical, cultural, and temporal contexts;

think independently, originally, and self-reflexively;

demonstrate a capacity for critical reflection and judgment in the light of evidence and argument;

identify, collate and organise relevant data and information from a variety of primary and secondary sources in support of their argument;

understand complex tasks and an ability to present appropriate solutions in written form;

work autonomously, manifested in self-direction, objective-setting, prioritising and time-management;

reflect on their own learning, seeking and making use of constructive feedback;

produce intellectually coherent academic analysis within word limits and time deadlines;

apply requisite referencing and presentation formats in the production of written analyses;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Class discussion in which analysis and interpretation of texts takes place allows the students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material. It allows for both tutor- and student-led opportunities for the discussion and comprehension of directed reading and secondary source information.

Analytical critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, contextualise, and interpret texts. The ability to collate and obtain information is developed through introductory training in the use of libraries and online resources.

Extended essays test their ability to order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which the presentation and prioritisation of material is conducive to its rhetorical effect.

In all modules, students are encouraged to refer to current critical and theoretical debate in order to form their own judgement of the text or data in question. They work towards a number of deadlines for formative and summative work, and for class presentation, thereby learning to prioritise assignments and objectives, and in doing so hone their time management skills.

Methods of Assessment

Progress through the degree is one in which the autonomous learning undertaken by students is gradually increased, from lecture/tutorial-based teaching at stages 1 and 2, to student-centred learning, through 2- or 3-hour seminars, at stage 3.

These general cognitive skills will be assessed by a variety of traditional and innovative methods including essays, exams, journals, portfolios, policy papers, dissertations and presentations, tutorial contributions.

Extended essays, policy papers, and the dissertation test students’ ability to order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which the presentation and prioritisation of material is conducive to its rhetorical effect. In all modules, students are encouraged to refer to current critical and theoretical debate in order to form their own judgement of the text or data in question.

Class discussion, in which analysis and interpretation of texts takes place, allows students to develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material.

Analytical critical exercises – both formative and summative – test students’ ability to engage with, contextualise, and interpret texts.

The dissertation, examinations and essays require students to demonstrate coverage of material, appropriate methods of analysis, the ability to discriminate between arguments, and the ability to form an independent argument.

Feedback is provided for each type and instance of assessment and students may seek dedicated feedback sessions with course tutors.

The Personal Tutor system facilitates student reflection upon academic performance and assists in developing strategies for improvement.

appreciate a range of historical and cultural perspectives on academic enquiry;

engage with and interpret layers of meaning within primary sources;

assess and appraise differing views on significant areas of academic debate;

discriminate between what is central and what is peripheral to the issue in question;

ethical requirements of study, which requires critical and reflective use of information and information technology in the learning process;

gather, organise and deploy evidence, data and information; and be familiar with appropriate means of identifying, finding, retrieving, sorting and exchanging information;

demonstrate intellectual integrity and maturity.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Seminars and tutorials offer a variety of tutor-led and student-led learning opportunities as well as a more sustained opportunity to debate and evaluate a breadth of knowledge gained independently from directed reading and from the sharing of resources and information.

Through class discussions, sometimes assigned to pairs or sub-groups, students develop a comparative understanding of different approaches to material and the ability to formulate their own arguments and responses.

Through supervision of dissertations and research essays students are encouraged to identify a research topic; collate relevant data and write an independent analysis of it.

Student-centred learning situations encourage the ability to present and summarise knowledge to peers in a coherent, structured form, and to further enhance organisational and inter-personal skills.

Methods of Assessment

Examinations and essays require that students demonstrate coverage of material, appropriate methods of analysis, the ability to discriminate between arguments, and the ability to form an independent argument.

Written exams help students gain a knowledge of a topic that can be readily and directly applied to a set problem or question, and also test their ability to select relevant information and to write clearly and concisely within a set time.

Essays test their ability to collect, order and shape information, and to recognise ways in which to present and prioritise material.

Coursework is required to be submitted in a specified form and to fixed deadlines, thus teaching students to learn to prioritise assignments and objectives and to hone their organisational and time-management skills.

Learning Outcomes: Transferable Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

manage time efficiently and effectively;

demonstrate basic word-processing and IT skills;

collate and process information from a variety of sources, including electronic media;

use libraries and online resources;

think both creatively and maturely in diverse intellectual situations;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Class presentations and student interaction hone communication and rhetorical skills. Student-centred learning situations encourage and test the ability to present and summarise knowledge to their peers in a coherent, structured form, and inter-personal skills are developed in seminars and tutorials.

Methods of Assessment

Writing skills tutorials and lectures develop essay writing on stylistic, rhetorical and bibliographical levels. The ability to source and collate information is developed through introductory training in the use of libraries and online resources. IT courses are available through the university and can be used to develop computing skills as required. All students are required to word-process essays, thus testing their acquisition of IT skills.

display interpersonal skills and the ability to work productively in a group context;

demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Individual and group presentations; developing skills at stage 1 through a dedicated skills module.


Exchange programmes with international universities

Methods of Assessment

Individual and group presentations; learning portfolio and coursework projects embedded across curriculum.

For most international exchanges, students enrol on the host institution’s undergraduate programme.

understand the role and use of feedback in assessing and improving performance;

respond constructively to criticism;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Students receive online feedback on their uploaded assignments and may seek further feedback in one-to-one meetings with tutors.

Engagement with Personal Tutors promotes student reflection upon academic performance. Personal Tutors also discuss career options with students; and the Schools work closely with the Careers Liaison Officer to present students with information on possible careers.

Methods of Assessment

Feedback (on the Virtual Learning Environment, on draft materials, or in class) provides students with an ongoing feedback experience throughout their degree.

Each student is allocated a Personal Tutor in stage 1 and meets with him/her throughout the duration of the

use their knowledge in cogent, communicable ways to present arguments and clarify complex issues in both oral and written forms;

present ideas and arguments orally in both formal and informal contexts; and the capacity to sustain a reasoned line of argument in the face of others, to listen, engage in sustained debate, and amend views as necessary in the light of evidence of argument;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Individual and group presentations.

Methods of Assessment

Individual and group presentations.

reflect on intellectual and professional priorities;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Engagement with Personal Tutors promotes student reflection upon academic performance. Personal Tutors also discuss career options with students; and the School works closely with the Careers Liaison Officer to present students with information on possible careers.

Methods of Assessment

Each student is allocated a Personal Tutor in level 1 and meets with him/her throughout the duration of the degree programme

manage their career development (including building a learning
portfolio and developing a CV)

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

placement opportunities available through the programme (internship and placement modules)
Use of the University’s Careers, Employability and Skills services (including in-class training provided by CES)

Methods of Assessment

Placement and internship modules assessed via policy-research papers and reflective/learning journals.
Personal Tutors and the School’s employability officer highlight career development opportunities available through CES.

demonstrate self-reliance, initiative, adaptability and intercultural awareness.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Exchange programmes with international universities.

Methods of Assessment

For most international exchanges, students enrol on the host institution’s undergraduate programme.

Learning Outcomes: Knowledge & Understanding

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Demonstrate in depth and extensive interdisciplinary understanding of contemporary international affairs and conflict situations in their political, historical, cultural, economic and legal dimensions.
understand core concepts and debates in International Relations, Security and Conflict as well as to particular experiences of regional areas.

demonstrate an understanding of the nature and extent of human diversity and commonality and account for this using a variety of analytical perspectives;

show an understanding and facility in the use of the repertoire of concepts, theories and key research methods;

be able to make connections between the disciplines of International Relations and Anthropology as well as other cognate areas such as politics

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Knowledge and understanding are developed through lectures, tutorials, seminars (many of which will be enhanced by learning aids such as hand-outs, and key readings available online through Canvas) and through the assessment and feedback process.

Lectures and tutorials together provide knowledge and the opportunity to discuss, evaluate and apply that knowledge to texts.

Seminars offer the more sustained opportunity to debate and evaluate a breadth of knowledge gained independently from directed reading and from the sharing of resources and information.

Extensive background reading is required throughout the pathway, developing students’ specialist knowledge of particular topics in addition to a broad base of knowledge about international relations.

Methods of Assessment

A range of assessment methods ensures that these skills are evaluated in different ways.

Formative written work assists the development of understanding, critical judgment, and independent thought, both through the feedback given, and through the process of writing itself.

The dissertation, examinations, essays, policy papers, portfolios, projects, and seminar presentations require that students demonstrate coverage of material, appropriate methods of analysis, the ability to discriminate between arguments, and the ability to form an independent argument.

Assessment of individual modules

show an appreciation and understanding of the relationship between local social and cultural forms in relation to global processes and broader historical developments;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Analysis of anthropological texts incorporated into the curriculum at all levels

Methods of Assessment

Exams, essays, seminar/tutorial contributions and dissertations

indicate a critical awareness of how anthropology is related to other cognate subjects;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

In lectures and tutorials students are encouraged to reflect on human cultural diversity and to compare different perspectives and methodological debates.

Methods of Assessment

Written and oral work particular attention is paid to the student’s awareness of cultural assumptions (including their own) and the ways in which these impact on an interpretation of others, as well as their awareness of different methodological approaches and debates.

Assessment of dissertations is based on the following: students are expected to provide evidence of field research, to demonstrate an awareness of the secondary literature on their research topic, and to offer a critical analysis of the topic.

In the dissertation submitted in the third year, emphasis is placed on students critically engaging with relevant anthropological debates on the basis of primary field data.

demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of the potential applications of anthropological knowledge in a variety of contexts;

display an ability to describe and analyse the ways in which human beings shape and are shaped by social, cultural and environmental contexts;

display an ability to identify and question cultural assumptions;

exhibit an understanding of the social and historical processes that influence the objects of anthropological study;

demonstrate an ability interpret and analyse a variety of oral, musical, visual and textual forms

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

In lectures and tutorials students are encouraged to identify different specialisms and the contribution that they make to our understanding of human cultural diversity.

The Anthropology curriculum provides students with a wide range of modules to choose from which reflect the different thematic and regional specialisms of members of staff.

At level 3 emphasis is placed on developing students’ ability to interpret anthropological texts and critically engage with anthropological debates.

Methods of Assessment

written and oral work particular attention is paid to the student’s awareness of cultural assumptions (including their own) and the ways in which these impact on an interpretation of others, as well as their awareness of different methodological approaches and debates.

Assessment of dissertations is based on the following: students are expected to provide evidence of field research, to demonstrate an awareness of the secondary literature on their research topic, and to offer a critical analysis of the topic.

In the dissertation submitted in the third year, emphasis is placed on students critically engaging with relevant anthropological debates on the basis of primary field data.

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

read texts with a developed awareness and appreciation of their theoretical, methodological and empirical properties;

understand the general methodological and theoretical approaches of the discipline as well as its basic history. This includes knowledge of its specific concepts, issues and vocabulary.

solve problems, process and prioritize a wide variety of information, and express arguments and positions in oral and written form

competency in areas such as the analysis of political decision-making, International History, International Security, and regional organizations areas such as the European Union.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures provide specific contextual and theoretical information as well as offering practical examples of different critical approaches.

Tutorials and seminars allow for close reading of academic texts and primary sources in a group situation, while developing students’ ability to formulate their own arguments and responses.

Formative work – both written and oral – enables students to combine the knowledge and skills developed through lectures and tutorials, and to formulate, and receive feedback on, their own independent arguments.

Methods of Assessment

These general cognitive skills will be assessed by a variety of traditional and innovative methods including essays, exams, journals, group-work, portfolios, policy papers, presentations, and tutorial contributions.

select and utilise primary quotation and secondary critical material in the formulation of an argument;

display familiarity with bibliographic convention and should be able to research, reference and present written work according to the requirements of the subject area;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Module and programme information and style sheets guide students in their choice of, access to, and citation of relevant secondary materials.

Methods of Assessment

Essays, dissertations, policy papers, portfolios

understand how human beings are shaped by, and interact with, their social, cultural and physical environments, and an appreciation of their social, cultural and biological diversity;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Discussions in tutorials encourage students to reflect on the human social and cultural diversity.

Methods of Assessment

In written and oral work, students are expected to demonstrate a knowledge of human social and cultural differences and how they emerge and are reproduced.

formulate, investigate and discuss anthropologically informed questions and a competence in using major theoretical perspectives and concepts in anthropology and to critically asses their strengths and limitations;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Lectures, seminars and tutorials aim to make students aware of the different cultures and able to critically analyse cultural difference.

Methods of Assessment

In written and oral work, students are expected to demonstrate a knowledge of human social and cultural differences and how they emerge and are reproduced.

engage with cultures, populations and groups different from their own, without foregoing a sense of personal judgment. An awareness of cultural assumptions, including their own, and the ways in which these impact on an interpretation of others;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Engagement with texts and class discussion to advance cultural self-awareness.

Methods of Assessment

Essays, dissertations, oral presentations.

critically read and interpret texts (for example: print, oral, film, multimedia) within their historical, social and theoretical contexts and acknowledge practical awareness of the strengths and limitations of ethnographic fieldwork and the different stages and requirements of carrying out an anthropological study;

analyse and recognise the politics of language, indirect forms of communication and theoretical statements, forms of power and claims of authority;

apply anthropological knowledge to a variety of practical situations, personal and professional plans, undertake and present scholarly work that demonstrates an understanding of anthropological aims, methods and theoretical considerations;

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

The Anthropology curriculum provides students with a wide choice of modules which reflect the different specialisms of members of staff.

Lectures, seminars and tutorials aim to advance students’ appreciation of the complexity of human cultural diversity and different theoretical traditions.

From level 1 through to level 3 students are taught the methods of professional anthropologists.

Methods of Assessment

Essays, dissertations, oral presentations.

Exhibit intellectual independence and the initiative to set tasks and solve problems Intellectual independence and the initiative to set tasks and solve problems.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

In seminars and tutorials students are encouraged to present their own ideas and views on particular topics.

In dissertations, students are expected to formulate their own research topic and engage in independent research on it.

Methods of Assessment

Essays and dissertations

MODULE INFORMATION

Stages and Modules

Module Title Module Code Level/ stage Credits

Availability

Duration Pre-requisite

Assessment

S1 S2 Core Option Coursework % Practical % Examination %
Asylum and Migration in Global Politics PAI3041 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Being Creative: Music Media and the Arts ESA1001 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
International Organisations PAI2056 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Politics of the Global Economy PAI3063 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Music and Identity in the Mediterranean ESA3012 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Challenges to contemporary party politics PAI3067 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
The Placement PAI3089 3 20 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Gender and Politics PAI3008 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Radical Hope:Inspiring Present-day Sustainability Transformations through an Examination of Our Past PAI3100 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 80% 20% 0%
Political Parties and Elections in Northern Ireland PAI3058 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Remembering the Future: Violent Pasts, Loss and the Politics of Hope ANT3152 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Politics in Diverse Societies PAI2066 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Politics, Public Administration and Policy-Making PAI3068 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
American Politics PAI2018 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Being Human: Evolution Culture and Society ANT1001 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Issues in Contemporary Politics PAI1003 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
World Politics PAI1006 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
In Gods We Trust: The New Science of Religion ANT3150 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Politics and Policy of the European Union PAI2001 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Modern Political Thought PAI2005 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Contemporary Political Philosophy PAI3025 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Us And them: Why do we have ingroups and outgroups? ANT1007 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
British Politics in crisis? PAI2002 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 65% 0% 35%
Irish Politics PAI2013 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
'Understanding Northern Ireland: History, Politics and Anthropology' ANT1006 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Skills in the Field: Ethnographic methods ANT2030 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
International Relations PAI2017 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Security and Terrorism PAI2055 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Global Pol. Econ. of Energy PAI3012 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Earth, Energy, Ethics and Economy: The Politics of Unsustainability PAI3026 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
US Foreign Policy PAI3038 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
National and Ethnic Minorities in European Politics PAI3059 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Human-Animal Relations: An Anthropological Perspective ANT3027 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 40% 0% 60%
Anthropology Dissertation ANT3099 3 40 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
A World on the Move:Historical and Anthropological Approaches to Globalization ANT1003 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 80% 0% 20%
Comparative Politics PAI1009 1 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Studying Politics PAI2043 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
The Politics of Irish Literature PAI3005 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
European Cultural Identities PAI3027 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Internship PAI3097 3 40 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Dissertation (Politics and International Studies) PAI3099 3 40 YES YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Security and Technology PAI3073 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
The Politics of Deeply Divided Societies PAI2011 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Hanging out on Street Corners: Public and applied Anthropology ANT2038 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 80% 20% 0%
The Northern Ireland Conflict and paths to peace HAP2001 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Human Morality ANT2039 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 40% 60% 0%
Ethics, Power and International Politics PAI3057 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Northern Ireland: A Case Study PAI3064 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Key Debates in Anthropology ANT2022 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
The Far Right in Western Europe and North America PAI3056 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 40% 60% 0%
The Politics of Performance: From Negotiation to Display ESA3002 3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 90% 10% 0%
Apocalypse! End of the World. HAP2065 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
Business Anthropology for the Digital Age ANT2036 2 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%
3 20 YES 12 weeks N YES 100% 0% 0%

Notes

Students must take 120 credits - 6 MODULES (THREE in Semester 1 and THREE in Semester 2). Students are required to take FOUR CORE modules. Students are required to take TWO OPTIONAL Anthropology modules PLUS ONE OPTIONAL International Relations module. “Students will be notified each academic year of the optional modules being offered in the following academic year. Students are advised that not all optional modules will necessarily be offered in each academic year. Also, the delivery of a module may be subject to a minimum number of enrolments as well as unforeseen circumstances (e.g. illness of a member of staff).  The range and content of optional modules will change over time as degree programmes develop and students’ choice of optional modules may also be limited due to timetabling constraints.“ Students are encouraged to consider enhancing their undergraduate experience by taking one of the International study options. These are:   • Studying for one semester exchange at one of our partner universities in Europe through the ERASMUS student exchange programme • Studying for one semester at one of our partner universities in the United States through our American student exchange programme.  For further information about semester abroad opportunities,  contact  Advisor of Studies or happexperience@qub.ac.uk

Students must take 120 credits - 6 MODULES (THREE in Semester 1 and THREE in Semester 2). Students are required to take FOUR CORE modules. Students are required to take TWO OPTIONAL Anthropology modules PLUS ONE OPTIONAL International Relations module. “Students will be notified each academic year of the optional modules being offered in the following academic year. Students are advised that not all optional modules will necessarily be offered in each academic year. Also, the delivery of a module may be subject to a minimum number of enrolments as well as unforeseen circumstances (e.g. illness of a member of staff).  The range and content of optional modules will change over time as degree programmes develop and students��� choice of optional modules may also be limited due to timetabling constraints.“ Students are encouraged to consider enhancing their undergraduate experience by taking one of the International study options. These are:   • Studying for one semester exchange at one of our partner universities in Europe through the ERASMUS student exchange programme • Studying for one semester at one of our partner universities in the United States through our American student exchange programme.  For further information about semester abroad opportunities,  contact  Advisor of Studies or happexperience@qub.ac.uk

Students must take 120 credits - 6 MODULES (THREE in Semester 1 and THREE in Semester 2). Students are required to take ONE CORE Anthropology module and ONE CORE International Relations module. Students are required to take TWO OPTIONAL Anthropology modules and TWO OPTIONAL International Relations modules.  “Students will be notified each academic year of the optional modules being offered in the following academic year. Students are advised that not all optional modules will necessarily be offered in each academic year. Also, the delivery of a module may be subject to a minimum number of enrolments as well as unforeseen circumstances (e.g. illness of a member of staff).  The range and content of optional modules will change over time as degree programmes develop and students’ choice of optional modules may also be limited due to timetabling constraints.“ Students are encouraged to consider enhancing their undergraduate experience by taking one of the International study options. These are:   • Studying for one semester exchange at one of our partner universities in Europe through the ERASMUS student exchange programme • Studying for one semester at one of our partner universities in the United States through our American student exchange programme.  For further information about semester abroad opportunities,  contact  Advisor of Studies or happexperience@qub.ac.uk

Students must take 120 credits - 6 MODULES (THREE in Semester 1 and THREE in Semester 2). Students are required to take: a) ANT3099– Dissertation (double weighted - Semester 1) and a further ONE module from Anthropology, PLUS THREE modules in International Relations; OR b) PAI3097 Internship (double weighted – both semester) and a further ONE module in International Relations, PLUS THREE modules from Anthropology;c) PAI3099 Dissertation (double weighted – both semester) and a further ONE module in International Relations, PLUS THREE modules from Anthropology; OR d) THREE modules from Anthropology and THREE modules from International Relations.  PLEASE NOTE: Students MUST consult their Advisor of Studies before enrolling for  a Dissertation in both Joint subject areas. “Students will be notified each academic year of the optional modules being offered in the following academic year. Students are advised that not all optional modules will necessarily be offered in each academic year. Also, the delivery of a module may be subject to a minimum number of enrolments as well as unforeseen circumstances (e.g. illness of a member of staff).  The range and content of optional modules will change over time as degree programmes develop and students’ choice of optional modules may also be limited due to timetabling constraints.“