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MA Public History

Academic Year 2021/22

A programme specification is required for any programme on which a student may be registered. All programmes of the University are subject to the University's Quality Assurance and Enhancement processes as set out in the DASA Policies and Procedures Manual.

Programme Title

MA Public History

Final Award
(exit route if applicable for Postgraduate Taught Programmes)

Master of Arts

Programme Code

HIS-MA-PH

UCAS Code

HECoS Code

100302

ATAS Clearance Required

No

Health Check Required

No

Portfolio Required

Interview Required

Mode of Study

Full Time

Type of Programme

Postgraduate

Length of Programme

1 Academic Year(s)

Total Credits for Programme

180

Exit Awards available

INSTITUTE INFORMATION

Teaching Institution

Queen's University Belfast

School/Department

History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics

Quality Code
https://www.qaa.ac.uk/quality-code

Higher Education Credit Framework for England
https://www.qaa.ac.uk/quality-code/higher-education-credit-framework-for-england

Level 7

Subject Benchmark Statements
https://www.qaa.ac.uk/quality-code/subject-benchmark-statements

The Frameworks for Higher Education Qualifications of UK Degree-Awarding Bodies
https://www.qaa.ac.uk/docs/qaa/quality-code/qualifications-frameworks.pdf

History (2014)

Accreditations (PSRB)

REGULATION INFORMATION

Does the Programme have any approved exemptions from the University General Regulations
(Please see General Regulations)

N/A

Programme Specific Regulations

N/A

Students with protected characteristics

N/A

Are students subject to Fitness to Practise Regulations

(Please see General Regulations)

No

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF PROGRAMME

Educational Aims of Programme:

Intellectual aims

This will give students the opportunity to:
- develop an advanced knowledge and understanding of the core theories, issues, concepts and scholarly debates in the field of Public History
- explore critically the range of ways in which history is presented to and experienced by public audiences, and how history is engaged with and used for a variety of purposes in the public realm
- understand a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives and intellectual contexts when considering the relationship between the past and public realm
- explore and understand issues relating to the exploration, presentation, and consumption of difficult or contested historic narratives in the public sphere in a number of comparative contexts.


Skills development aims

This will give students the opportunity to
- develop skills in presenting history to a range of public audiences for a variety of purposes using a range of methods ( including public presentation, media, photography, exhibition design, online curation, oral history collection).
- develop a range of academic and professional skills including the ability to engage in independent research
- work collaboratively with practitioners in the cultural and heritage sectors
- work independently and as part of a team in presenting aspects of history to a range of public audiences

Impact development aims
This will give students the opportunity to:
- understand how their learning, knowledge and understanding equips them to contribute to debates around the practice, purpose and understanding of history in the public realm
- contribute to academic impact by stimulating and shaping intellectual debates in Public History
- work with practitioners and academics to build capacity in the heritage and cultural sectors across Northern Ireland and beyond
- develop their own academic and professional impact across a wide range of developmental skills through training events, peer engagement, engagement with public audiences and heritage professionals, and an internship.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Learning Outcomes: Cognitive Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Recognise and use appropriate theories, concepts and principles from history and relevant cognate disciplines.

Understand and communicate complex ideas and concepts to both academic and public audiences.

Critically evaluate the theory and practice of history in academic and public spheres

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Seminars, readings.

Seminars, field work, practitioner workshops, internship.

Seminars, field work, practitioner workshops, internship.

Methods of Assessment

Essays, dissertation.

Essays, dissertation, presentation, projects.

Essays, presentation

Learning Outcomes: Knowledge & Understanding

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Critically evaluate the communication of historical knowledge and understanding by bodies outside the academy.

Understand how the content and communication of knowledge can be adapted to meet the needs of a range of audiences.

Understand the challenges presented in conveying contested historical narratives to public audiences.

Understand the development of public history as an academic field.

Understand common theories and methodologies utilised by historians.

Utilise a range of methods to communicate ideas and historical narratives (eg. Exhibits, Digital Media, Published Text).

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Seminars, field work, practitioner workshops, internship.

Seminars, field work, practitioner workshops, internship.

Seminars, field work, practitioner workshops, internship.

Seminars.

Seminars.

Seminars, workshops, projects.

Methods of Assessment

Essays, projects, presentations.

Essays, projects, presentations.

Essays, projects, presentations.

Essay.

Essay.

Projects; blogs; portfolio.

Learning Outcomes: Subject Specific

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Demonstrate an ability to use effectively relevant archives, finding aids and online resources in completing a major personal research project.

Undertake a public history project in the workplace both individually and as part of a team and to reflect critically on their practice.

Handle, catalogue, describe and organise historical sources and artefacts.

Develop skills relating to the assessment and analysis of sources.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Seminars, calendaring project.

Internship; fieldwork.

Seminars; fieldwork; practitioner workshops.

Seminars; dissertation.

Methods of Assessment

Calendar/finding aid and introductory essay.

Portfolio, presentation, and reflective essay.

Essays; presentations.

Calendaring project and interpretive essay; dissertation.

Learning Outcomes: Transferable Skills

On the completion of this course successful students will be able to:

Communicate complex ideas effectively to a range of audiences.

Manage time and resources and work effectively as part a team.

Demonstrate an ability to conceptualise, plan and see through to completion a major personal research project to a high standard of historical professionalism.

Demonstrate competency and a professional approach to undertaking research and the presentation of project work.

Teaching/Learning Methods and Strategies

Archival visits; calendaring project; practitioner workshops; internship.

Practitioner workshops; field trips; internship.

Seminars, dissertation.

Seminars, internship.

Methods of Assessment

Calendar and portfolio.

Portfolio and reflective essay.

Dissertation.

Essays and dissertation.

MODULE INFORMATION

Programme Requirements

Module Title

Module Code

Level/ stage

Credits

Availability

Duration

Pre-requisite

 

Assessment

 

 

 

 

S1

S2

 

 

Core

Option

Coursework %

Practical %

Examination %

Dissertation

MHY7010

7

60

YES

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

History and its Audiences

MHY7092

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

The Historian's Craft

MHY7020

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Public History Internship(MA Public History pathway)

MHY7091

7

40

YES

12 weeks

Y

YES

100%

0%

0%

Case Studies in History

MHY7089

7

20

YES

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

80%

20%

0%

Individually Negotiated Topic in History

MHY7011

7

20

YES

12 weeks

N

YES

100%

0%

0%

Notes

Students must take 180 credits - 6 MODULES (THREE in Semester 1 and THREE in Semester 2) PLUS the MA Dissertation (60 credits).
Students are required to take FIVE CORE modules (THREE in semester 1 and TWO in semester 2 (one of which is a double-weighted module) PLUS the MA Dissertation).


“Students will be notified each academic year of the optional modules being offered in the following academic year. Students are advised that not all optional modules will necessarily be offered in each academic year. Also, the delivery of a module may be subject to a minimum number of enrolments as well as unforeseen circumstances (e.g. illness of a member of staff). The range and content of optional modules will change over time as degree programmes develop and students’ choice of optional modules may also be limited due to timetabling constraints.“