Skip to main content

Fellowship Academy profiles - AHSS

Dr Thea Buckley
Dr Thea Buckley
Arts, English & Languages

My key research interests are intercultural Shakespeare, Indian Shakespeares, and Shakespeare in South India, in performance, film, translation, and appropriation.

What is your proudest career achievement?

My proudest career achievement to date is co-chairing the international conference 'Women and Indian Shakespeares' at Queen's in 2019 with another QUB postdoc, Dr Rosa-Garcia Periago -- with scholarly talks, public screenings along with filmmakers' Q&A at the QFT, and a free concurrent public exhibition funded by the Being Human Festival on "Discovering Shakespeare's Indian Connections" at the Linen Hall Library in Belfast city centre. .

What one piece of advice would you give to those considering applying for the Fellowship at Queen’s?

Discuss your plans, research interests and dreams beforehand with the people that you will hope to be working with -- the junior and senior scholars at Queen's are friendly and accessible, even though they are at the top of their field! They can give invaluable advice on why choosing Queens could be a great fit for your research, the next natural step on an important career parth and the start of fruitful research relationships and adventures.

Read more Read less
Clara Fischer, headshot
Dr Clara Fischer
History, Anthropology, Philosophy & Politics

My current research is on gender, emotion, and public policy, with a focus on “women and the politics of crisis”. I also have research interests in feminist-pragmatism, theories of emotion/affect, embodiment and shame, institutionalisation and containment, Irish feminisms, and gender and austerity. 

How does your research and its outcomes impact on wider society?
My research has always been geared toward a variety of audiences, reaching across civil society and academia. I have been very involved in advocacy work, especially on gender and social justice issues. I am a former director of the Irish Feminist Network and a founding member of the Equality Budgeting Campaign (which was set up specifically to redress the disproportionate effects of austerity on women and marginalised populations). 

What is your proudest career achievement?
I'm proud of being awarded a Newton International Fellowship by the British Academy (2014-2016), and a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Fellowship by the European Commission (2017-2020). I'm also grateful I had the opportunity to represent the Equality Budgeting Campaign at the UN CEDAW hearings (Ireland's examination of women's human rights) in Geneva in 2017.

What one piece of advice would you give to those considering applying for a Fellowship?
Get in touch with colleagues at Queen's for advice and information before applying. People are really very helpful and can give you a good steer on what to expect. Most importantly, apply! It is a fantastic opportunity that will have a huge impact on your research, career development, and life more generally!

Pure: Dr Clara Fischer

Read more Read less
Dr Alison Garden
Arts, English & Languages

Taking an interdisciplinary approach that draws together historical, cultural and literary research, my UKRI Future Leaders Fellowship will enable myself and the project team to produce the first sustained engagement with 'mixed marriage', or 'love across the divide' across the island of Ireland in the twentieth century. It will help us understand how the narratives told about Irish culture, politics and society intersect with the lived experience of Irish people.

How does your research and its outcomes impact on wider society?
Marrying across political and/or religious divides has often been a contentious issue; especially in Ireland, where the stakes of these allegiances are high. Despite the relative prevalence of the phenomenon and the vital insight that studying these marriage patterns could give us into an extraordinarily turbulent period in Irish and British history, there has been very limited research on this subject. This project redresses this urgent need to engage with a history that impacts on people's lives today. 

What is your proudest career achievement?
It is hard to isolate any one thing: I doubt I would have been successful in securing in my UKRI Fellowship without having secured my Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellowship, and that I wouldn't have secured my that without my Irish Research Council Fellowship, or Leverhulme, or Fulbright...! And so on. Honestly, what gives me the greatest sense of achievement is sharing my experiences with others and seeing them go on to secure Fellowships and grants of their own. I'm truly delighted to be in a position where I can build a supportive research culture for my project group and hope that I can continue to do this.

What one piece of advice would you give to those considering applying for a Fellowship?
Remember that Fellowships are different from Research Grants. They are much more about *you* as an individual and your development. Why are you the right person for this Fellowship and this project? What skills will you gain during the Fellowship and how will you be different at the end? And, of course, to remember that academia is astonishingly competitive and to try not to be disheartened with rejection. It really does happen to everyone. 

Pure: Dr Alison Garden

Read more Read less
Shonagh Hill, headshot
Dr Shonagh Hill
Arts, English & Languages

‘Generational Feminisms in Contemporary Northern Irish Performance’ (GenFem) will examine the embodied experiences of different generations of women in Northern Ireland, as well as their differing relationships to feminisms: both feminist movements and feminist ideas as they circulate within culture. These embodied experiences will be explored through the context of performance and will investigate working practices that address the tensions and solidarities of intergenerational relationships. 

How does your research and its outcomes impact on wider society?
As I explore my research questions through the lens of performance, I assert the value of embodied forms of knowledge. While some of the project outputs are intended for an academic audience, a broader public audience will have the opportunity to engage with the practice-based elements (including workshops devised with dance company, Maiden Voyage).

What is your proudest career achievement?
The publication of my monograph, Women and Embodied Mythmaking in Irish Theatre (Cambridge UP, 2019). I'm particularly proud that the work has been described as 'poetic' as my goal was for the book to take a shape that reflects my argument, namely that we need to find alternative structures to assemble neglected histories. 

What one piece of advice would you give to those considering applying for a Fellowship?
Chat to peers who have applied for/ have held the fellowship. Have a longer term plan in mind when applying so that you can use the fellowship to work towards that goal.

Pure: Dr Shonagh Hill

Read more Read less
Ann-Maria Walsh, headshot
Dr Ann-Maria Walsh
Arts, English & Languages

My current research is focused on recovering the manuscript letters of the seventeenth-century Boyle women in order to understand how women corresponded across the European territories.  As the center piece of this study,  I am preparing a scholarly edition of the women's outgoing letters for publication with the Irish Manuscripts Commission. 

How does your research and its outcomes impact on wider society?
The publication of an edition of the Boyle women’s letters will ensure that those rarely heard female voices are preserved and made more accessible for a wider, future readership. The recovery and re-reading of the letters will enable a much more complex and nuanced understanding of the past and how individual women perceived and sought to represent themselves and their place in Irish, British, and European history. 

What is your proudest career achievement?
My proudest career achievement is the publication of my first monograph in March 2020, The daughters of the first earl of Cork: writing family, faith, politics and place (Four Courts Press, Dublin).  

What one piece of advice would you give to those considering applying for a Fellowship?
Give yourself sufficient time to think creatively and consider how you might more closely integrate the different parts of your project.     

Read more Read less
Briony Widdis headshot
Dr Briony Widdis
History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics

Museums, Empire and Northern Irish Identity is an ESRC-funded postdoctoral fellowship focusing on the legacies of empire and colonialism in Northern Ireland, and the role of museums in these debates. I seek to use public anthropology and social history to explore how contemporary identities connect with colonial collections. My interdisciplinary approach engages with both academic and museum research, including collaborating with living communities, and with historical perspectives represented within collections and archives.

How does your research and its outcomes impact on wider society?
My research improves understanding of how colonial collections in Northern Ireland intersect with the public benefits afforded by museums. I work on museum decolonisation, shifting authorship of museum programmes through collaborations with diverse groups, improving and broadening participation in museum spaces and programmes generally, using collections more effectively, developing the role of museums in divided societies and rigorously attending to integrity, honesty and ethical museum practice.

What is your proudest career achievement?
I've been privileged to work with a lot of brilliant people in museums. Right now, I'm proud to be leading this project, bridging work in academia and museums on the legacies of colonialism and empire.

What one piece of advice would you give to those considering applying for a Fellowship?
Work with an academic champion who is committed to making a difference in your chosen field.

Pure: Dr Briony Widdis

Read more Read less