Statistical Information 2

What influenced where the children were living in 2004?

A range of factors influenced where the children were living in 2004 (i.e. whether they had been adopted, were living in foster care, or had returned to live with their birth parents). These factors were: where the children lived; mother’s living arrangements; parental alcohol problems; age of the child when first entered care; and length of time that the case was open.

 

Where you live

The findings suggest that where children lived made a difference to whether they were adopted, remained in foster care, or returned home to birth parents. 

In 2004, the Northern Board had placed 59% of children with adopted parents, 22% with birth parents, 16% in non-relative foster care, 1% in relative foster care and 2% on residence orders. At that time, the Southern Board had placed 69% of children with adopted parents, 19% with birth parents, 6% in non-relative foster care, 0% in relative foster care and 6% on residence orders. The Eastern Board had placed 33% of children with adopted parents, 34% with birth parents, 20% in non-relative foster care, 6% in relative foster care and 7% on residence orders, whilst the Western Board had placed 19% of children with adopted parents, 21% with birth parents, 46% in non-relative foster care, 14% in relative foster care and 0% on residence orders. The overall distribution in 2004 being 42% of children living with adopted parents, 27% with birth parents,  23% in non-relative foster care, 6% in relative foster care and 4% on residence orders.

  

Mother’s living arrangements

Children whose mothers were living alone when the study started were 2½ times more likely to be adopted by 2002 than those whose parents were living together.

“Because I’m obviously a single parent and her dad’s never been there, my family aren’t there to support her, I feel like I’m having to play the role for so many people ...”  (Birth parent)


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