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The McCosh Lecture

Lecture 2017

The McCosh Lecture 2017 was given by the writer and commentator on religion, Karen Armstrong on the subject of 'Is religion really violent?'.  The lecture was held on Wednesday 3rd May at 2pm in the Great Hall (Lanyon Building).  The event was opened by Vice-Chancellor Professor Patrick Johnston and introduced by the Director of the Institute of Theology, Joan Rahilly.

Lecture 2016

The McCosh Lecture 2016 was given by the American novelist and essayist, Marilynne Robinson on the subject of 'Religion and Literature'. The lecture was held on Wednesday, 20th April 2016 at 2.00 p.m. in the Whitla Hall. The event was opened by Vice-Chancellor Professor Patrick Johnston and introduced by the Director of the Institute of Theology, Joan Rahilly. Marilynne Robinson was interviewed afterwards by the BBC broadcaster, William Crawley.

Lecture 2015

Mona Siddiqui, OBE, Professor of Islamic and Interreligious Studies, University of Edinburgh, delivered The McCosh Lecture 2015 on the subject of 'Between Halal and Hijab: Ideals and Realities of Islamic Law in Europe' on Wednesday, 29th April 2015, in the Canada Room, Lanyon Building, QUB. The event was opened by Professor Tony Gallagher and Professor Siddiqui's lecture was responded to by Colin Harvey (Professor of Human Rights Law, QUB).

Lecture 2014

Professor Terry Eagleton, Literary Critic, Cultural Theorist and Distinguished Professor in English Literature, University of Lancasterdelivered the Annual Religious Studies Lecture 2014 on the subject of: "Was Jesus a Revolutionary?". The lecture was held on Wednesday, 4 June 2014, in the Canada Room, Lanyon Building, QUB. Professor Eagleton's lecture was responded to by Richard English (Wardlaw Professor of Politics, University of St Andrews) and Dr Diarmid Finnegan (Senior Lecturer in Human Geography, QUB). 

For a copy of the lecture and responses, click here.

Lecture 2013

The 2013 Annual Lecture was given by Mike Hulme, Professor of Climate Change (University of East Anglia).  The lecture was entitled 'Climate Change and Virtue: An Apologetic'.  Professor Hulme argued that climate change is showing us not only the extent of human influence on the planet, but also the limits of programmatic management of this influence through political, economic, technological and social engineering.  He went on to propose a different, non-programmatic response to the challenges of climate change – a return to the ancient and religious idea of virtue.  The event was opened by the Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research, Professor James McElnay, and after the lecture a round table discussion was held with Professor John Brewer, Dr John Barry, and Professor David Livingstone, Chair of the Forum.

For a copy of the lecture, click here.

Lecture 2012

The guest speaker at this year's Religious Studies Lecture was Professor Mark Noll, Francis McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana. A member of the National Academy of Arts and Sciences and the recipient of the United States National Humanities Medal, Professor Noll gave a lecture on the subject 'The Bible, Race and Slavery as an Enduring American Problem'.

The symposium was opened by Vice-Chancellor Professor Sir Peter Gregson, and after the lecture responses were given by Professor Colin Kidd from the School of History and Anthropology and Professor David Livingstone, Chair of the Religious Studies Research Forum Steering Group. 

For a copy of the lecture, click here.

Lecture 2011

The guest speaker was philosopher Nicholas Wolterstorff (Yale).  Professor Wolterstorff gave a lecture on the subject 'Why Justice and Rights Matter'. Professor John Brewer (University of Aberdeen), Professor Stephen Williams (Union Theological College) and Professor Shane O’Neill (QUB) acted as discussants. The chair was Professor David Livingstone, Director of the Research Forum.

For a copy of the lecture, click here.