School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

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Fulbright

Fulbright Award to CCE PhD student

20/06/2016


Laura Dornan, a final year Chemistry PhD student, has received a Fulbright Scholar Award, which she will use to carry out postdoctoral research at Stanford University.

The Fulbright Commission selects scholars through a rigorous application and interview process and it is one of the most prestigious and competitive scholarship programmes operating worldwide.

Laura, from Belfast, graduated from QUB in 2012 with a First Class Honours MSci degree. Laura then started her PhD studies, working with Dr Mark Muldoon, where she has explored catalytic oxidation reactions. Her PhD studies have been focussed on developing new methods that will enable chemical reactions to be carried out more efficiently. This work could help important chemicals (e.g. pharmaceuticals) to be produced in a more sustainable manner; producing less waste and utilising less energy.  Laura will graduate in December 2016 before taking up her position at Stanford University in January 2017. The Department of Chemistry at Stanford is consistently ranked as one of the world’s best departments and Laura will work with Professor Robert Waymouth, someone who is internationally renowned for their work on organometallic catalysis.

Penny Egan CBE, Executive Director, US-UK Fulbright Commission said of the 2016-2017 cohort: “These Fulbright scholars represent the great academic diversity of the United Kingdom. They are ambassadors for Senator Fulbright’s vision of a world brought closer together through cultural and educational exchange. I am sure they will do the UK credit as they join a global Fulbright alumni network of Nobel Prize winners, world leaders and outstanding academics.”

For more details and the list of all 2016-2017 British Fulbright Scholars see here.

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