News

American Poet Mark Doty takes up International Visiting Poetry Fellowship at Queen’s University

 

 

 

Award-winning American poet, Mark Doty, has taken up his post as the first International Visiting Poetry Fellow at the Seamus Heaney Centre at Queen’s University Belfast.

The Fellowship was created as part of Queen’s University's and the Arts Council of Northern Ireland's (ACNI) joint ten-year Seamus Heaney Legacy project and is offered to a distinguished poet of international repute. It has been generously supported by the Atlantic Philanthropies. 

Mr Doty will be based at the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry for the month of November, presenting public readings, workshops and masterclasses for students at the University. He will also engage in outreach activities at the Seamus Heaney Homeplace in Bellaghy, the John O’Connor Literary Arts Festival and the Outburst Queer Arts Festival.  

Mr Doty is best known for his powerful work written in response to the AIDS epidemic and his nine books of poems include My Alexandria, which won the US National Book Critics Circle Award and became the first book by an American poet to win the T. S. Eliot Prize in the UK in 1995. A former Guggenheim Fellow and Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, he currently lives in New York City.

 

Speaking about his appointment and looking ahead to his time in Belfast, Mr Doty said: “Seamus Heaney’s deep affection for the people and places of home struck a chord with readers around the world. It's a huge honor to be the first poet to receive this fellowship in his name. Belfast offers one of the great audiences for poetry; I don’t know that I’ve ever read to an audience that listened with such deep attention. I’m delighted to return here, and much looking forward to speaking with Irish readers, poets and audiences.”

Professor Glenn Patterson, Director of the Seamus Heaney Centre at Queen’s, said: “We were delighted to work with the Arts Council on this prestigious Fellowship in tribute to Seamus Heaney, in whose memory the award is made. We look forward to welcoming Mark Doty to Belfast and to the Seamus Heaney Centre.”

Nóirín McKinney, Director of Arts Development at the ACNI, commented:  “We are delighted to welcome Mark Doty’s appointment as the very first Seamus Heaney International Visiting Poetry Fellow. We are honoured to host him and we anticipate this appointment will benefit not only local writers and the academic community but the wider public, through workshops, readings and lectures.”

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Poetry Prize 2018 Winner Announced

The Seamus Heaney Centre is delighted to announce the winner of this year’s First Collection Poetry Prize is: 

Useful Verses, by Richard Osmond (Picador Poetry, 2017)

Useful Verses is a wonderfully original collection, which relishes and renews everything that poetry can do with language. 
It’s also a challenging vision of our relations with the natural world.’

                                                                                                         Professor Edna Longley, Chair of the judging panel.

Richard Osmond's debut collection Useful Verses follows in the tradition of the best nature writing, being as much about the human world as the natural, the present as the past. Osmond, a professional forager, has a deep knowledge of flora and fauna as they appear in both natural and human history, as they are depicted in both folklore and herbal - but he views them through a wholly contemporary lens.Chamomile is discussed through quantum physics, ants through social media, wood sorrel through online gambling, and mugwort through a traffic cone.

This is a fiercely inventive, darkly witty and brilliantly observed debut from a voice unlike any other you have read before - and as far from any quaint and conservative notion of 'nature poetry' as it is possible to get.

Richard Osmond (b. 1987) works as a wild-food forager, searching for plants, fruits and fungi among the forests and hedgerows of Hertfordshire. He received an Eric Gregory Award from the Society of Authors in 2017.

 

About the Shortlist 2018

Kumukanda,by Kayo Chingonyi (Chatto & Windus)

The Immortalist, by Ellen Cranitch (Templar Poetry)

Alarum, by Wayne Holloway-Smith (Bloodaxe Books)

All the Prayers in the House, by Miriam Nash (Bloodaxe Books)

 

About the Prize

The Seamus Heaney Centre Poetry Prize was inaugurated to celebrate the work of the Centre, and to honour its founding poet. It is awarded to a writer whose first full collection has been published in the preceding year, by a UK or Ireland-based publisher, through the support of Glucksman Ireland House (New York University), and The Atlantic Philanthropies.

The winning writer receives £5,000 and is invited to read at Glucksman Ireland House at New York University for the annual Tom Quinlan Lecture in Poetry (Autumn 2018). For this they receive travel, accommodation, and a $1,000 honorarium.

The prize was announced at an evening reception on Tue 3 July 2018, 7.30pm at No Alibis Bookstore, Botanic Avenue, Belfast.  

2018 Judges

This year’s judges are Professor Edna Longley (critic and Professor Emeritus at Queen’s University Belfast), Professor Gerald Dawe (writer and Fellow Emeritus at Trinity College Dublin), Doireann Ni Ghriofa (poet and Fellow at the Seamus Heaney Centre).

About Glucksman Ireland House

Located in the heart of Greenwich Village, Glucksman Ireland House is New York University's Center for Irish and Irish-American Studies and one of the top-ranked academic Irish Studies programs in the United States. Through innovative undergraduate and graduate academic curricula and extensive public programming, it provides students and the public with access to the best in Irish and Irish-American culture, and an integrated approach to understanding the arts and humanities that represent Ireland and Irish-America’s past, present, and future.

About the Seamus Heaney Centre

Since 2003 the Seamus Heaney Centre has been home to some of the UK and Ireland’s foremost poets, novelists, scriptwriters, and critics. Building on a literary heritage at Queen’s University Belfast that stretches back to the 1960s ‘Belfast Group’, the Centre is dedicated to excellence and innovation in creative writing and poetry criticism.

        

For further information contact:  

Rachel Brown | Centre Coordinator | Seamus Heaney Centre at Queen’s

r.brown@qub.ac.uk | +44(0)28 9097 1074

http://www.seamusheaneycentre.com/

 

Miriam Nyhan | Associate Director | Glucksman Ireland House NYU

miriam.nyhan@nyu.edu | +1 (212) 998-3952

http://as.nyu.edu/irelandhouse.html

 

Alice Dewing | Picador Poetry

alice.dewing@macmillan.com | +44(0)20 7014 6146 |@alicemaydewing

www.richardosmond.com

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Poetry Prize 2018 Shortlist Announced

The Seamus Heaney Centre's First Collection Poetry Prize
supported by Glucksman Ireland House, NYU

*ANNOUNCING THE SHORTLIST FOR 2018* 

Kayo Chingonyi, Kumukanda, Chatto & Windus

Ellen Cranitch, The Immortalist, Templar Poetry

Wayne Holloway-Smith, Alarum, Bloodaxe Books

Miriam Nash, All the Prayers in the House, Bloodaxe Books

Richard Osmond, Useful Verses, Picador Poetry

 

The winner will be announced during the Seamus Heaney Centre’s annual Poetry Summer School, at the Award Night on Tue 3 July 2018, 7.30pm, No Alibis Bookstore, Botanic Avenue, Belfast.

 

About the Prize

The Seamus Heaney Centre Poetry Prize is awarded to a writer whose first full collection has been published in the preceding year, by a UK or Ireland-based publisher. The winning writer receives £5,000 and is invited to read at Glucksman Ireland House at New York University. For this they receive travel, accommodation, and a $1,000 honorarium.

 

2018 Judges

This year’s judges are Professor Edna Longley (critic and Professor Emeritus at Queen’s University Belfast), Professor Gerald Dawe (writer and Fellow Emeritus at Trinity College Dublin), Doireann Ni Ghriofa (poet and Fellow at the Seamus Heaney Centre).

 

About Glucksman Ireland House

Located in the heart of Greenwich Village, Glucksman Ireland House is New York University's Center for Irish and Irish-American Studies and one of the top-ranked academic Irish Studies programs in the United States. Through innovative undergraduate and graduate academic curricula and extensive public programming, it provides students and the public with access to the best in Irish and Irish-American culture, and an integrated approach to understanding the arts and humanities that represent Ireland and Irish-America’s past, present, and future.

 

About the Seamus Heaney Centre

Since 2003 the Seamus Heaney Centre has been home to some of the UK and Ireland’s foremost poets, novelists, scriptwriters, and critics. Building on a literary heritage at Queen’s University Belfast that stretches back to the 1960s ‘Belfast Group’, the Centre is dedicated to excellence and innovation in creative writing and poetry criticism.

 

Further Information           

For further information contact:  

Rachel Brown | Centre Coordinator | Seamus Heaney Centre at Queen’s

r.brown@qub.ac.uk | +44(0)28 9097 1074

http://www.seamusheaneycentre.com/

 

Miriam Nyhan | Associate Director | Glucksman Ireland House NYU

miriam.nyhan@nyu.edu | +1 (212) 998-3952

http://as.nyu.edu/irelandhouse.html

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Good Vibrations hits the Lyric Stage in September 

The Lyric Theatre has just announced that as part of its 50th anniversary programme and to celebrate the 40th Anniversary of Good Vibrations, the story of influential music promoter, producer and legendary founder of the record label – the undisputed Godfather of Belfast Punk, Terri Hooley – will be brought to the stage. 

Good Vibrations is written by Colin Carberry and Glenn Patterson, Director of the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry, and tells the story of Terri Hooley, a radical, rebel and music-lover in 1970s Belfast when the conflict shuts down his city. As all his friends take sides and take up arms, Terri opens a record shop on ‘the most bombed half-mile in Europe’ and calls it Good Vibrations. Through it he discovers a compelling voice of resistance in the city's underground punk scenes. Galvanising the young musicians into action, he becomes the unlikely leader of a motley band of kids and punks who join him in his mission to create a new community, an alternative Ulster, to bring his city back to life.  The show takes us from the heights of working with John Peel and bands such as The Undertones, to volatile encounters with the mainstream music industry, all the while showing Terri’s tireless commitment to local bands and music. ‘Teenage Kicks’ was the first record in the history of BBC radio to be played twice in a row and it would remain John Peel’s all-time favourite – a legacy that it is now Belfast’s ‘National Anthem.’  Good Vibrations underlines the communal spirit of these bands that gather up behind the record shop owner who won't say no.  It celebrates energy, ideas, optimism, self-worth, and the empowerment of punk rock. 

Executive Producer of the Lyric, Jimmy Fay, commented:

“The legend of Terri Hooley and his shop Good Vibrations is one of the great folk-tales of Belfast.  How the sheer raw energy of soul / punk / do-it-yourself music can transform your current reality and bring all that’s mighty and great about your imagination and spirit into your everyday existence. Belfast has always had this independence of spirit, this challenge to conformity and celebration of dark humour. Good Vibrations was an iconic record shop, a superb movie and it’s a tale that still needs to be told. It belongs on the stage in all its rip-roaring rage and fury and anarchic humour. We at the Lyric are delighted to present this on our stage bringing it all back home to Belfast.”

 It has been adapted for the stage by the team who co-wrote the Good Vibrations biopic - Colin Carberry and Glenn Patterson - for which the pair were nominated for Outstanding Debut at the 2014 BAFTA Film awards. They had previously won Best Script at the 2013 Irish Writers Guild Awards, Best Script at the 2012 Dinard British Film Festival and they were nominated for Best First Script of 2013 by the Writers Guild of Great Britain.

Glenn Patterson commented:

“Good Vibrations was born out of love of the power of music and its vitality, and the attraction of the stage is that you get this in the raw - the power of live music. We see the stage as a place that offers new possibilities and a chance to capture the theatrical excitement, the immediacy, and show this in its full potential. I feel even more so in 2018 than in 2013 that it’s a story of great relevance.  It is the story of Terri’s life, shop, label, but much more - it’s about a way of life.  The time and climate are right to celebrate all the things for which Terri stood – they are all the qualities you want to embrace.”

Good Vibrations will be directed by Belfast’s Des Kennedy, who has directed in Belfast, Dublin and is currently the International Associate Director of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child on both the Broadway and Australian productions. Des’s directing credits include Gulliver’s Travels and White Star of the North at the Lyric and Associate Director of Once: The Musical.

Colin Carberry commented:

"It’s great to be able to work again on Good Vibrations. Noisy stages and big nights out are at the heart of many of Terri’s best yarns – so what better way to mark the Lyric’s 50th and Good Vibes’ 40th than with a month full of them this September?  Terri’s story, and that of Northern punk, celebrates unity, defiance, creativity and cheek. The film fed off these values. We’re confident the play will too."

Terri Hooley commented:

“I’m thrilled that the 40th Anniversary will be celebrated by the Lyric Theatre and delighted that a Belfast team of writers, directors and producers will be bringing Good Vibrations to new audiences.  I’m very proud that we opened up nightlife in Belfast when the city centre was a no-go area for many people. It didn’t matter if you had green hair or orange hair, it mattered if you were a punk. They were my heroes.” 

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Myra sends kids 'Head over Heels' about writing

The first Seamus Heaney Children’s Writing Fellow for Northern Ireland, Myra Zepf, recently visited primary six pupils from Bocombra Primary School in Portadown to run a creative writing class as part of her ‘Head over Heels’ programme for primary schools. 

The creative writing programme saw Myra visit 25 primary schools across Northern Ireland – in Irish as well as English-medium sectors – to run creative writing sessions with the children. The programme will cumulate with five schools attending a special event at the Seamus Heaney HomePlace in Bellaghy, where the top stories from the programme will be illustrated by five of Ireland’s top illustrators including the Children’s Laureate, Laureate na nÓg PJ Lynch.

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Seamus Heaney Centre Fellows

The Seamus Heaney Centre at Queen’s has great pleasure in announcing the appointment of Jo Baker, Doireann Ní Ghríofa, and Peter Wilson (who performs as Duke Special) as its first Seamus Heaney Centre Fellows.

The Fellowships will enable three writers annually to contribute to the activities of the Seamus Heaney Centre within the university and the wider literary community, and represent a major commitment on the part of the Centre to the encouragement and celebration of writing in all its forms.

Doireann Ní Ghríofa, who writes in Irish and English, was the winner of the 2016 Rooney Prize for Irish Literature. Jo Baker is the author of six novels, most recently A Country Road, A Tree. While Hallow – Duke Special’s latest release on CD and vinyl – is based on the poetry of Michael Longley.

Peter Wilson said, 'I am delighted and honoured to have been offered a Fellowship at the Seamus Heaney Centre.  For the last decade, I have been exploring the places where art forms collide, between music, photography, theatre, fiction and poetry.  I am excited to see what transpires as a result of this fellowship and my encounters with other creative people at the Seamus Heaney Centre.’

 Doireann Ní Ghríofa meanwhile said she was excited at the prospect of spending time in Belfast. ‘I've been following the literary vibrancy of ​the city from afar for some time.​ I'm immensely grateful to be offered this opportunity. I am very much looking forward to working in tandem with the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry at Queen's University​ to devise and deliver a series of events.’

For Jo Baker the Fellowship represents a kind of homecoming. ‘I’m a former student of Queen’s, and my time there, within the English Department, and as a member of the Writers’ Group, was absolutely transformative for me. 
The Seamus Heaney Centre was established towards the end of my time at the University. I remember the fresh clean paint and the deliberately-red-wine-coloured carpet, and the sense that here was what was needed: space - whole rooms, a whole building - in which writers could work and learn, and be part of a creative community. Life took me elsewhere, but it was wonderful place to start from, and I’m delighted that they're prepared to have me back. 

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The shortlist was announced on January 10th for the £5,000 Stanford Dolman Travel Book of the Year. The seven titles include two on the topical subject of borders and one on small islands off Britain, a portrait of Pakistan and one of Kolkata, a book driven by the wind and one brimming with stories of the sea, and includes The Rule of the Land: Walking Ireland's Border by Garrett Carr. The winner will be announced on February 1.

See the shortlist here.

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New Bursary for MA in Creative Writing: Prose/ Drama 2018/19 Announced & MA in Poetry Bursary Applications Now Open
MA in Creative Writing - £5,000 scholarship

The Seamus Heaney Centre is delighted to announce a brand new bursary for the MA in Creative Writing/Drama in 2018/19. The MA fee scholarship of £5,000 is available to a UK or Ireland based full-time student for the academic year 2018-19. All applications to the MA in Creative Writing programme received by 7 May 2018 will be automatically considered for the award. Applications for the MA received after this date will not be eligible for the award. For further information and to apply to the MA in Creative Writing please see:

http://www.qub.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate-taught/english-creative-writing-ma/

 

MA in Poetry - £10,000 scholarship 

A Seamus Heaney Centre MA fee scholarship of £10,000 is available to an international fulltime student in 2018-19. The closing date for the award is 7 May 2018. All international applicants who have applied for the programme by the closing date will be automatically considered for the award. For further information and to apply to the MA in Poetry please see:

[http://www.qub.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate-taught/english-poetry-ma/]

 

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Poetry Prize for First Full Collection 2018

Seamus Heaney Centre Poetry Summer School dates for 2018 Announced

The Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry offers an intensive week of creative practice in the Poetry Summer School which this year runs from 2nd - 6th July 2018. The week comprises a variety of sessions with seminars, group workshops and one-to-one tutorials with creative writing tutors. There will also be staff and student poetry readings and other evening events.

Places are limited to 12 and interested applicants should send a sample of their work (4 poems) to the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry, School of English, Queen's University Belfast, BT7 1NN by emailing (shc@qub.ac.uk) by Friday 2nd March, 2018 at the latest.

Successful applicants (over 18s only) will be informed within the week. Submissions of work may be emailed or posted. The fee for the summer school is £600 (includes lunch and snacks).

Any queries, please contact shc@qub.ac.uk. 

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Acclaimed American Poet Mark Doty Annouced as the Seamus Heaney International Visiting Poetry Fellow

Best known for his powerful work written in response to the AIDS epidemic, multi-award winning American poet Mark Doty has accepted the invitation to be the first Seamus Heaney International Visiting Poetry Fellow at Queen’s University Belfast.

The fellowship, created as part of the Arts Council of Northern Ireland and Queen’s University Belfast’s joint ten-year Seamus Heaney Legacy project, is worth £20,000 annually and made to a distinguished poet of international repute.

Mark Doty will formally take up his post in Autumn 2018, when he will be based for four weeks at the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry at Queen’s, already an internationally-recognised centre of excellence in contemporary literature, presenting public readings, workshops and masterclasses.

During his time, the poet will also engage in outreach activities at the new Seamus Heaney Homeplace in Bellaghy, offering workshops and readings for groups visiting the new facility.

 

Mark Doty Biography

Mark Doty’s nine books of poems include My Alexandria, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award and was the first book by an American poet to win the T. S. Eliot Prize in the United Kingdom. Fire to Fire: New and Selected Poems won the National Book Award for Poetry in 2008, Deep Lane was shortlisted for the T S Eliot Prize in 2016. He has also published five volumes of nonfiction prose, including Heaven’s Coast, which won the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for Nonfiction, Firebird, chosen the Gay and Lesbian Book of the Year by the American Library Association, and Dog Years, a New York Times bestseller. A former Guggenheim Fellow and Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, he lives in New York City. A new book, What Is the Grass, a memoir of a lifetime of reading Walt Whitman, will be published by W W Norton in 2019 for the 200th anniversary of Whitman’s birth.

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Ireland Chair of Poetry Lecture

Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin,  Ireland Chair of Poetry

'Pearse Hutchinson (1927-2012): A Poet and His Languages'

Thursday 23 March at 8pm in Crescent Arts Centre
In this lecture, the poet looks at her late friend Pearse's relationship with the Irish language and the languages of Europe to ask how not just foreign places but the learning of their languages affects the texture of his poetry.

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Blackbird Anthology - Launched

Blackbird - new writing from The Seamus Heaney CentreAn eclectic mix of the best prose, poetry and drama from recent graduates, edited by Darran McCann.  
  "This centre holds / and spreads."     
Official launch party at the Crescent Arts Centre on Dec 9th at 7.30pm.
Help celebrate the future.
Come along and meet them before they're famous!
 

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Anne Enright: Lecture

Thursday, 20 October at 8pm
Great Hall, Lanyon Building, Queen's University Belfast

Anne Enright is the inaugural Laureate for Irish Fiction
and was awarded the honour by the Arts Council in early
2015. She has published essays, short stories and fiction.
The Gathering won the 2007 Man Booker Prize for Fiction
and the Irish Novel of the Year, and The Forgotten Waltz
(2011) won the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in
Fiction. Her latest novel, The Green Road (2015), won the
Irish Novel of the Year and the Kerry Group Irish Fiction Award.
The Arts Council and The Laureate for Irish Fiction, Anne Enright, in
association with The Stinging Fly present the annual Laureate for
Irish Fiction Lecture:
‘An Irishwoman Abroad: Maeve Brennan Goes Mad In New York’.

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Jean Bleakney:  Book Launch, Selected Poems (Templar, 2016)
In Association with Templar Poetry
Crescent Arts Centre, Thursday 6 October at 7.30pm  (Please note earlier time)

Born in 1956 in Newry, Jean has published three poetry collections with Lagan Press: The Ripple Tank Experiment (1999), The Poet's Ivy (2003) and ions (2011).  Her work has been selected by the Northern Ireland Examinations Board (CCEA) for study at GCE Level.  Join us and Templar Poetry as we celebrate the launch of her Selected Poems (Templar, 2016).

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Winner Announced

THE SEAMUS HEANEY CENTRE FOR POETRY
PRIZE FOR FIRST FULL COLLECTION 2016

Supported by Glucksman Ireland House, 
New York University

The Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry at Queen’s University, Belfast, is delighted to announce the winner of the seventh Prize for First Full Collection.

The Prize is awarded annually to the writer of the best first collection published in the UK or Ireland in the preceding year and is awarded with support from Glucksman Ireland House at New York University. Glucksman Ireland House, the Center for Irish and Irish-American Studies at NYU supports the award through generous funding in honour of Thomas Quinlan, a third generation Irish-American teacher and educator.

The Prize will be awarded on Thursday, 30 June, during the Seamus Heaney Centre Poetry Summer School, at No Alibis Bookshop, Botanic Avenue, Belfast.

The winner of this year’s Prize is 
KATE MILLER
for her book
The Observances
(Carcanet)

The winner receives a cheque for £5,000. In addition they are invited to read at Glucksman Ireland House at New York University for the annual Tom Quinlan Lecture in Poetry, provided with travel, accommodation, and an honorarium.   The lecture takes place in the autumn 2016.

The Chair of the judges this year was Dr Leontia Flynn, alongside Dr Paul Batchelor and Dr Caitriona O’Reilly. Leontia Flynn said “This was a strong shortlist of first poetry collections, each with a very distinctive style, project and outlook.  Ultimately, the judges decided unanimously on a book where the quiet but intense sensibility of the author is integral to her poetic endeavour.“

Of the winner the judges said, “‘The Observances’ is an ambitious and unusual debut, with an assurance and an authority that poets more often find (if they find it at all) later in their careers. But there is nothing ‘settled’ here in the pejorative sense of that word: in fact the poems are often on the move, traveling through experience, tracing the processes by which life comes into being and passes away, eyes open for the illuminating image, ears attuned to subtleties of tone and register. Maturity can be manifested in many ways, and here it means the confidence to take risks deliberately — the risks necessary to let the world in.” (Paul Batchelor)    “These poems dramatize the movement of consciousness in a way might be described as phenomenological – Miller is a frank enough, and an assured enough poet, to rely on her apprehensions and she does so in language of great fidelity and freshness. The resonance of its title, ‘The Observances’, hints at the many levels on which this collection satisfies.”  (Caitriona O’Reilly)

The Seamus Heaney Centre Poetry Prize for First Full Collection was inaugurated to celebrate the work of the Heaney Centre, and to honour its founding poet.  The Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry is a focal point for creativity in Ireland and is recognised as an international centre of creative and research excellence in the field of literature. Central to the Centre’s ethos is the encouragement of emerging talent.

The shortlisted runners-up were:

Jim Carruth, Killochries, (Freight Books)
John Dennison, Otherwise, (Carcanet)
Sarah Howe, Loop of Jade, (Chatto & Windus)
Rebecca Perry, Beauty/Beauty, (Bloodaxe Books)

 

For more information contact Dr Leontia Flynn, l.flynn@qub.ac.uk.

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Paul Murray Reading

Thursday 1 December at 8pm in Crescent Arts Centre

Paul Murray has written three novels, including Skippy Dies and, most reently, The Mark and The Void.  His stories have been published in Granta, The Paris Review, The New York Times and elsewhere.  He lives in Dublin.

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Shortlist Press Release

PRESS RELEASE

THE SEAMUS HEANEY CENTRE FOR POETRY
PRIZE FOR FIRST FULL COLLECTION 2016
Supported by Glucksman Ireland House, New York University

The Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry at Queen’s University, Belfast, is delighted to announce the shortlist for the seventh Seamus Heaney Centre Prize for Poetry.   The Prize is awarded annually to the writer of the best first collection published in the UK or Ireland in the preceding year.

The shortlist for this year’s Prize is:

Jim Carruth, Killochries, (Freight Books)
John Dennison, Otherwise, (Carcanet)
Sarah Howe, Loop of Jade, (Chatto & Windus)
Kate Miller, The Observances, (Carcanet)
Rebecca Perry, Beauty/Beauty, (Bloodaxe Books)

The winner will be announced during the Seamus Heaney Centre Poetry Summer School, 27 June – 1 July 2016.   The Seamus Heaney Prize for Poetry for 2016 will be £5,000. In addition the winner will be invited to read at Glucksman Ireland House at New York University for the annual Tom Quinlan Lecture in Poetry, provided with travel, accommodation, and an honorarium.   (http://irelandhouse.fas.nyu.edu/page/home).

About Glucksman Ireland House

Located in the heart of Greenwich Village, Glucksman Ireland House is New York University's Center for Irish and Irish-American Studies and one of the top-ranked academic Irish Studies programs in the United States. Through innovative undergraduate and graduate academic curricula and extensive public programming, it provides access to the best in Irish and Irish-American culture. With faculty in Irish and Irish-American literature, history, music, language, and cultural studies, Glucksman Ireland House NYU provides its students and the community with an integrated approach to understanding the arts and humanities that represent Ireland and Irish-America’s past, present, and future.

Further Information

For further information, contact Anne Solari or Miriam Nyhan at Glucksman Ireland House NYU at anne.solari@nyu.edu/miriam.nyhan@nyu.edu or +1 (212) 998-3952; or, Mrs Gerry Hellawell at the Seamus Heaney Centre at Queens University, Belfast, at g.hellawell@qub.ac.uk or +44(0)2890971070.

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THE SEAMUS HEANEY CENTRE FOR POETRY
PRIZE FOR FIRST FULL COLLECTION 2017
Supported by Glucksman Ireland House, 
New York University

The Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry at Queen’s University, Belfast, is delighted to announce the winner of the seventh Prize for First Full Collection.

The Prize is awarded annually to the writer of the best first collection published in the UK or Ireland in the preceding year and is awarded with support from Glucksman Ireland House at New York University. Glucksman Ireland House, the Center for Irish and Irish-American Studies at NYU supports the award through generous funding in honour of Thomas Quinlan, a third generation Irish-American teacher and educator.

The Prize will be awarded on Thursday, 29 June, during the Seamus Heaney Centre Poetry Summer School, at No Alibis Bookshop, Botanic Avenue, Belfast.

The winner of this year’s Prize is 
ADAM CROTHERS
for his book
Several Deer  (Carcanet)

 

The winner receives a cheque for £5,000. In addition they are invited to read at Glucksman Ireland House at New York University for the annual Tom Quinlan Lecture in Poetry.   The lecture takes place in the autumn 2017.

 The Chair of the judges this year was Dr Leontia Flynn, alongside Professor Eileán Ní Chuilleanáin and Dr Conor O’Callaghan.

 The judges said of the winner:  'This is a collection that shows intellectual force and ambition, its language always taut and lively and fun for the reader.  Nightmare whispers, musical echoes, emotional truths, collide; the poems have each their own stance, and the book opens on an ocean of voices.'  (Eileán Ní Chuilleanáin)

"Adam Crothers' Several Deer is that rare thing, a genuinely enjoyable poetry collection. It is also, in places, very funny. His register is that of the misheard or misremebered, of 'pussy rot' or 'the unquiet gravy'. Sources as disparate as The Sensations and Robert Herrick get mashed together into goofball sonnets and villanelles. And yet for all its wit and brio, there is great seriousness to his work. Crothers is a worthy addition to yet another nouvelle vague of brilliant young poets from Northern Ireland." (Conor O’Callaghan)

The Seamus Heaney Centre Poetry Prize for First Full Collection was inaugurated to celebrate the work of the Heaney Centre, and to honour its founding poet.  The Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry is a focal point for creativity in Ireland and is recognised as an international centre of creative and research excellence in the field of literature. Central to the Centre’s ethos is the encouragement of emerging talent.

The shortlisted runners-up were:

 

Claire Askew, This Changes Things (Bloodaxe)
Em Strang, Bird-Woman (Shearsman Books)
Rebecca Watts, The Met Office Advises Caution (Carcanet)
Alex Wong, Poems without Irony (Carcanet)

For more information contact Dr Leontia Flynn, l.flynn@qub.ac.uk.

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The Rule of the Land: Walking Ireland's Border by Garrett Carr has been shortlisted for the Stanford Dolman Travel Book of the Year Award.

The Rule of the Land: Walking Ireland's Border by Garrett Carr shortlisted for the Stanford Dolman Travel Book of the Year Award

The shortlist was announced on January 10th for the £5,000 Stanford Dolman Travel Book of the Year. The seven titles include two on the topical subject of borders and one on small islands off Britain, a portrait of Pakistan and one of Kolkata, a book driven by the wind and one brimming with stories of the sea, and includes The Rule of the Land: Walking Ireland's Border by Garrett Carr. The winner will be announced on February 1.

See the shortlist here.

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