Meabh McAuley - student profile

Méabh McAuleyMeabh McAuley - profile photo

First Supervisor: Professor Beverley Milton-Edwards.

Second Supervisor: Dr Birgit Schippers

 

‌Research Title:

Women, Daesh and Discourse: A Critical Analysis.

Research Interests:

My research interests include feminist theory, feminist security studies, gender in international relations, women in ethno-nationalist conflict and women in community development.  Much of my academic research has focused on uncovering the actual roles and ‘public’ contributions of women and the basis for women’s social and political values and views. My research at undergraduate and MA level focused on women in Northern Ireland and concepts of identity and agency.  My PhD research however, includes an international perspective.  It takes as its case the agency of women from ‘caliphate’ territories governed by Daesh in Syria and Iraq (2013-2016).

In this context, my thesis aims to critically analyse the representations of women that are constructed through UK state and media discourse, as well as Daesh discourses.  As I discussed, it takes as its case the agency of women living in the ‘caliphate’ territories governed by Daesh in Syria and Iraq (2013-2016).  I work from the frame of feminist theorizations of war and security to examine the function and impact of these discourses.  Specifically, I aim to analyse their role in reproducing and legitimizing patriarchal constructions of social reality during periods of war and violent conflict.  Moreover, I employ narrative analysis to examine the ways in which women’s everyday lives and their perceptions, social attitudes and identities are impacted and informed by the discourses outlined.  My research questions are: How are women and their ‘roles’ portrayed in UK state and media discourse, as well as Daesh discourses?  How do these depictions influence social practices, attitudes, and power relations in relation to women?  What impact do such discourses have on women and how are they negotiated and challenged by women?

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