Perception Action Movement

Perception Action Movement

Our research covers two main areas. The first focuses on the psychology of perception and action. Research includes understanding perceptual processes and the specification of information for action, motor timing, postural control and the neural plasticity of the motor system. The second related area focuses on non-verbal communication, particularly emotion. The emphasis is on the measurement and modelling of emotion, signalling and communication processes. Both areas of research have particular relevance to human-computer interaction.

Professor

Richard Carson

My research focuses upon the development of novel approaches to the amelioration of age-related cognitive and behavioural dysfunction. In this context, a pivotal role is ascribed to methods and applications that optimise the utilisation of adaptive brain plasticity. Much of my current clinical and pre-clinical research has a specific emphasis upon the neuro-rehabilitation of stroke survivors.

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Dr

Will Curran

Recent vision research has been in the areas of motion transparency, interactions between direction sensitive mechanisms, neural mechanisms underlying adaptation in the human visual system, and local & global motion processing. My current research focuses on time perception, as well as investigating the role of laughter in social interaction.

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Dr

Joost Dessing

My research focuses on eye-hand coordination of reaching movements to stationary objects (such as picking up a cup of coffee) as well as moving objects (such as catching and hitting movements). I examine how (predominantly visual) information is transformed by the brain into adequate motor commands.

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Dr

Mihalis Doumas

I am interested in the way sensory information and cognitive resources are utilised for optimal motor behaviour. My work focuses on (1) Life-span development of sensorimotor and cognitive processes (2) multisensory integration in postural control and (3) timing of rhythmic movements, using neurophysiological, cognitive and developmental (Life span) approaches.

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Dr

Matthew Rodger

I am interested in how our senses help us to coordinate our actions and learn new movement-based skills. In particular, I am interested in the coordination of movement with sound. This includes understanding how people move in time with rhythmic sounds, how hearing our own actions can help with the coordination of movement or in learning a new skill, and how musicians skilfully control sound to produce musical performances.

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Research Centres

MOVEMENT INNOVATION LAB

Cutting edge training and intervention programmes

The aim of this lab is to make use of both our expertise and state-of-the-art technology to help understand and improve different kinds of performance.

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Impact

Movement Innovation Lab (MIL)

The development of movement training games at the Movement Innovation Lab (MIL) aims to improve balance in older adults and also general mobility in people with Partkinson's disease.

Immersive interactive virtual reality (VR) technology allows the team at the MIL to develop a new type of analytics that profiles a player's ability to make the right decision, at the right time and in the right way and is being used to train better decision making in sport.

Dr Matthew Rodger

Understanding how sound can help with the coordination of movement has impact for different skill learning and rehabilitation applications. My research includes: studying coordination in children with visual impairments and using interactive sounds to help them move better; transforming golf swing movements into sound so that learners can hear and practice better technique; helping people with Parkinson’s disease walk more stably using rhythmic sounds as guides.

“Our collaboration with Queen’s has the potential to make a huge difference to the lives of children living with sight loss, right from birth. The data that the research provides will be used to inform our work with children and young people, helping us to provide more targeted support for children with sight loss and their families.”

Fiona Brown
Head of Mobility Services at Guide Dogs NI

 

Research Network

  • Dr Caroline Whyatt, Rutgers University, US - road-crossing in children with autism
  • Professor Paola Cesari, University of Verona - sensory guidance of movement
  • Dr Lieke Peper, Vrije University Amsterdam - visual cues and freezing of gait in Parkinson’s
  • Dr David Jacobs, Dr Lorena Lobo, Prof David Travieso – Autonomous University of Madrid
  • Dr Ivan Camponagara, Prof Paola Cesari, Dr Naeem Komeilipoor – University of Verona
  • Prof Brent Gillespie; Dr Sile O’Modhrain – University of Michigan
  • Dr Marta Bienkiewicz, Prof Christophe Bourdin, Dr Lionel Bringoux, Prof Richard Kronland-Martinet, Prof Solvi-Ystad – Aix-Marseille University
  • Dr Johann Issartel – Dublin City University