Modules

Level 3 modules 2018-19 

Semester One Half Modules

PSY3104: The Visual Brain

The module will provide an overview of the brain systems supporting visual perception. It will investigate the evidence for specialised pathways in the visual system, drawing on research evidence from several disciplines; such as psychophysics, infant studies, neuropsychology, brain anatomy and physiology.

Assessment: 100% Coursework

PSY3115: Sport and Exercise Psychology

The module will introduce students to a variety of topics examining human behaviour in sport and exercise contexts. The content will begin with understanding the major developments in the history of sport and exercise psychology before progressing to exploring specific aspects such as motivation, team and group dynamics, improving performance through the use of imagery, the relationship between exercise and psychological well-being, concluding with the social construction of sport and exercise as seen through the lens of disability, gender, age, sexual orientation and ethnicity.

Assessment: 100% Coursework

PSY3120: The development of mathematics skills and educational interventions

The aim of this module is to give students a thorough and up-to-date introduction into the typical and atypical development of mathematics skills, and the educational interventions that can be used to improve mathematics achievement. The topics that will be covered include: the foundations of mathematics skills, dyscalculia, mathematics anxiety, the role of parents and teachers in mathematics learning, and educational interventions.

Assessment: 100% Coursework

Semester One Full Modules

PSY3096: Typical and Atypical Literacy Development

This module will examine current and historical perspectives of typical and atypical literacy development. The development of reading ability from early language perception to proficient text processing will be examined. We will discuss approaches to the acquisition of literacy, and the theoretical underpinnings of developmental dyslexia and specific language impairment (SLI).

This module will be of interest to a wide range of psychology students, but will be of particular relevance to those intending to pursue a career related to education or to postgraduate research and study.

Assessment: 100% coursework

PSY3100: Psychologists at work: Insights into Graduate Employment

Students taking this module will spend 15/20 days in a workplace where they will complete graduate level work under supervision. They will be required to keep a reflective diary of their experiences in the work place and to complete a portfolio describing the organisation for which they have worked, how they have been able to apply the skills they acquired on their degree, what skills they have developed or acquired as part of the placement, the skillset required to obtain a job in the organisation, and what they have learned from the feedback they received from their employer. This module is only available to students on the BSc Psychology degree programme.

Assessment: 100% Coursework

PSY3118: Using Nudges to Change Behaviour

This module will introduce students to recent theory and practice relating to behaviour change. Specifically, it will consider the psychology of “nudges”, small changes to choice architectures which encourage certain desirable behaviours without making those behaviours mandatory. Having addressed important theoretical background, the module will consider nudges in a variety of contexts including health, finance and pro-social behaviour. The module will conclude with a consideration of implications of nudge theory for policy and the very recent debate about the ethics of nudges. The module will be assessed via group reports proposing, analysing and justifying novel nudges for particular applied contexts.

Assessment: 100% coursework

PSY3121: The Psychology of Intergroup Relations: Theory and Applications

The aim of this module is to provide students with an insight into the role of psychology in explaining intergroup relations from both a theoretical and applied perspective. During the course of the module students will get a thorough grounding in the theories underlying prejudice and discrimination and how this can be ameliorated. The module occurs in two parts. In the first, students will critically examine theories of prejudice and prejudice reduction. In the second, students will have an opportunity to explore how these theories have been adapted and applied to create interventions focusing on children and young people within divided societies.

Assessment: 100% Coursework

Semester Two Half Modules

PSY3108: Exploring psychological issues in cancer

This module will introduce some of the issues that need to be considered when designing and conducting psychological research among people with cancer, people at risk of cancer, oncology health care professionals and the family/carers of people with cancer. The module will also include discussion of the role of psychology in the causes and consequences of cancer and the diversity of psychological challenges at different time points along the cancer journey. As an applied module, the topics covered in the module will draw on several key areas of psychology (eg. social, cognitive, developmental, research methods). Classes will be organised on a participatory basis and include group discussions of key issues.

Assessment: 100% Exam

PSY3110: Applied Animal Psychology

The module will introduce students to the area of animal psychology, focusing in particular on the applied aspect of this field. Lectures will cover topics of animal welfare, animal ethics, environmental enrichment, pet behaviour therapy and companion animals and human health.

Assessment: 100% Exam

PSY3111: Advanced Topics in Cognitive Development

This course will focus on a set of key topics regarding cognitive development, building on students’ knowledge of the area acquired at Level 2. Topics will include an in-depth examination of children’s developing knowledge of the physical and mental world including topics such space, time, planning and the development of the set of socio-cognitive skills usually described as “Theory of Mind”. Against the background of these topics, the course will introduce competing approaches to cognitive development that have become prominent over the last two decades and explore the methodological challenges that developmental psychologists face in researching children’s thinking.

Assessment: 100% exam

PSY3112: Youth and Political Violence: Risk and Resilience Processes

Youth exposed to political violence face an increased risk of developing externalizing problems, such as aggression, as well as internalizing disorders, such as depression. Children and adolescents may be active perpetrators of violence, participating as child soldiers, porters, or sex slaves or recruited into armed groups. Yet, not all youth exposed to political violence experience negative psychosocial effects; moreover, the constructive agency of youth amid conflict is not well understood. Toward this end, the module focuses on resilience processes, that is, identifying risk and protective factors can explain why and how political conflict affects youth. This module incorporates theory and research in developmental, social, and political psychology, with a focus on real-world application.

Assessment: 100% Exam

Semester Two Full Modules

PSY3080: Psychology of Serial Killers

This module will cover the psychology of serial killers in an attempt to address the question `why do individuals become serial killers? It will explore the definitions and typologies of serial killers, what distinguishes these from other types of murder(ers) and the problems and pitfalls with these descriptions. The course will consider sex murders and the concept of the psychopath. Possible explanations of why individuals become serial killers will be critically appraised. Profiling techniques, including crime scene analysis and investigative psychology will be reviewed and whether these advance our understanding of the motivation of the serial killers considered. The course will also consider the anti-hero status of some types of serial killers and public fascination with such crimes. Case studies of serial killers will be presented throughout. It should be noted the course will cover some potentially disturbing factual material.

Assessment: 66% Exam; 34% Coursework

PSY3098: Ageing: Mind, Brain and Behaviour

The module covers three major themes in the psychology of ageing; mind, brain, and behaviour. The mind theme introduces cognitive, social, and emotional aspects of ageing. We consider decision making in older age, how older adults interact with their social environment, and how emotional processing changes with age. The brain theme introduces psychophysiological changes that occur with age. We consider how ageing affects memory and attention and some of the underlying physiology involved. The behaviour theme focuses on sensori-motor control in older age, on how mobility can be compromised with age, and introduces methods for improving mobility in older age.

Assessment: 60% Exam; 40% coursework

PSY3117: Psychology of Gender

This course introduces students to the psychological literature on gender. Course topics include the causes of sex differences and similarities, the influence of gender roles on life experiences including those related to workplace/leadership, parenting, sexuality, violence and aggression, as well as the relationship between gender and health and well-being.

Assessment: 100% Coursework

PSY3114: Psychology Thesis

Thesis work allows each student to perform real research including: origination of idea, literature review, research design, data collection and analysis and report writing. It involves a substantive piece of research conducted by the student (normally working in pairs) which is presented in the form of a thesis. When students perform data collection in pairs, they will each analyse different subsets of the data, and produce independent reports.  Students work under the supervision of an individual member of academic staff.

Another element of this module is to assess the breadth and depth of the student’s knowledge of psychology in general, and their capacity to reflect and integrate across theoretical perspectives via a general paper.  It also helps students to focus on careers planning, their individual achievements and skills portfolio.

Assessment: 80% Coursework (Thesis); 20% Exam (General Paper)

 

Semester

Module Code

Module Title

Assessment

1

PSY3104

The Visual Brain

Coursework

1

PSY3115

Sport and Exercise Psychology

Coursework

1

PSY3120

The development of mathematics skills and educational interventions

Coursework

1

PSY3096

Typical and Atypical Literacy Development

Coursework

1

PSY3100

Psychologists at work: Insights Into Graduate Employment

Coursework

1

PSY3118

Using Nudges to Change Behaviour

Coursework

1

PSY3121

The Psychology of Intergroup Relations: Theory and Applications

Coursework

 

 

 

 

2

PSY3108

Exploring Psychological Issues in Cancer

Exam

2

PSY3112

Youth & Political Violence: Risk and Resilience Processes

Exam

2

PSY3110

Applied Animal Psychology

Exam

2

PSY3111

Advanced Topics in Cognitive Development

Exam

2

PSY3080

Psychology of Serial Killers

Coursework & Exam

2

PSY3098

Aging: Mind, Brain and Behaviour

Coursework & Exam

2

PSY3117

Psychology of Gender

Coursework

Both

PSY3114

Psychology Thesis

Coursework & Exam

 

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