Making a social difference
PROJECTS AND COLLABORATIONS

We have a vibrant, active and diverse research community generating impactful world class research. Our researchers are involved in a number of strategic partnerships and collaborations within the University and beyond; working with funders and partners including research councils, government departments, the EU, Council of Europe and large foundations.

Below are a few examples of our research into the important issues facing society today.  

 

Corona virus representation

Covid-19 Research

Centre for Children’s Rights - The Covid-19 Cohort Global Consultation (#COVIDUnder19)

A team from The Centre for Children’s Rights are the academic lead in a coalition with the UN and 25 international NGOs, including Terre des Hommes, Child Rights Connect and World Vision International, among others. Together they are conducting a rights-based global consultation with children and young people to capture their views on COVID-19 with a view to informing the policy and practices affecting their lives now and in future emergency/crisis situations.

Decisions are being taken about children during the COVID-19 pandemic that will have extensive impact on their lives, without any understanding of their lived experiences and views. Little has been done to convey information to children that speaks to their circumstances, needs, and in a language they understand. An international advisory group of children and young people will be involved at all stages of this project from planning and design through to impact and dissemination. During the research design stage, a global consultation was undertaken with 270 children and young people from 28 countries, and our international partners, to inform the development of a survey, due to be launched at the end of May 2020.

 

The study will generate a rich understanding of the concept and experiences of Covid-19 from the perspectives of children and young people from all around the world. We expect to gain insights into the challenges they face and, importantly, the ways in which they demonstrate agency, resilience and creativity in these new circumstances. The knowledge and understanding gained in this crisis will have implications not just for incidents like this in the future but also for the many children who currently spend their lives in isolation for their own health or because they are excluded from school or are in detention.

The team led by Dr Katrina Lloyd will use this understanding to inform the development of a range of outputs and resources focused on improving professional practices and intergenerational relationships. The Centre for Children’s Rights has extensive expertise in co-producing accessible reports (including ‘everyone’ and ‘child-friendly’ reports) and communicating findings to policy makers and others based on implementing children’s rights. We will also work closely with our partners to translate documents in to the five main UN languages (and additional languages – time permitting) to have a broader global impact. We also have well-established links with our collaborators and other influential key partners across the world who will benefit from the findings in their professional contexts, including advocacy for and with children, as well as international policy formation.

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Corona virus representation

Covid-19 Research

Peace-building and the Covid-19 Pandemic in Northern Ireland - Negotiating New Challenges to Post-Conflict Societal Resilience

More than two decades since Northern Ireland’s peace agreement, peacebuilding organisations continue to face daunting challenges, such as continuing communal divisions (which have been exacerbated by Brexit), paramilitary activity, dealing with the past, mental health issues, intergenerational trauma and structural inequalities. The Covid-19 pandemic has confronted peacebuilding organisations with new challenges in how they provide services and support in these and other areas. In this project, we focus on how peacebuilding organisations are negotiating these new challenges to post-conflict societal resilience, comparing churches engaged in ecumenical/cross-community activities with dedicated community relations organisations.

 

 

Before the pandemic, churches and community relations organisations would have emphasised the transformative power of face-to-face human interactions for building the types of relationships that help produce peace. The pandemic means that face-to-face interactions have moved online or are fraught with difficulty and risk, which has forced organisations to abandon or change their practices and priorities. New questions are arising about how to protect hard-won progress in developing more peaceful relations in the immediate term, and what new forms this work may need to take over time. How such organisations adapt to the new conditions will impact on Northern Ireland’s ongoing transition from violence to peace and its development of societal resilience, in both the short and the long-term.

This project capitalises on our already well-established links with churches (Dr Gladys Ganiel) and community relations organisations working for peace (Dr Sarah Jankowitz). Working in partnership with key umbrella organisations in the faith-based sector (the Irish Council of Churches/Irish Inter-Church Meeting) and the cross-community sector (the Community Relations Council), we are analysing how churches and community relations organisations are adjusting their practices and priorities during the pandemic. This is being done with a view to identifying good practices and policy recommendations that can be shared across the faith-based and community relations sectors.

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Corona virus representation

Covid-19 Research

Caring through Vulnerability: Exploring Affect and Emotion during Covid19

This project aims to investigate three interlinked themes: vulnerability, care, and emotions/affects. The project team including Dr Lisa Smyth, Dr Giulia Carabelli and Dr Teresa Degenhardt are interested in understanding how vulnerability and care are experienced, understood and responded to through emotions and affect, from family and interspecies relationships to collective forms of friendship and solidarity with immigrants and asylum seekers in detention. We explore the ethical complexity of care giving at time of crisis, reflecting on the ways social actors experience vulnerability and seek comfort and meaning in the everyday, when quarantine conditions make physical contact either severely restricted or extremely close.

This project pays attention to the ethical quality of carers’ emotional lives, as well as the affective bonds forged between human and non-human species during isolation.



 

Strand 1 (Lisa Smyth) Vulnerable Agents: family caring in a pandemic aims to examine how ethical vulnerability is perceived and practically evaluated by caregivers in family relationships, during an extended period of extreme disruption. Focusing on moral emotions in caregiving, particularly anxiety and guilt, as well as pride and shame, this research strand will gather oral testimonials of family caregiving under extremely strained conditions during the pandemic. The focus is on those less likely to work from home, more likely to be at risk of contracting virus through front-line employment, and more likely to be living in close quarters and small spaces. 

Strand 2 (Giulia Carabelli) Multi-species homemaking during social isolation: care for Plants will create a visual archive of multi-species homemaking practices under lockdown. Specifically, the research strand reflects on the roles played by plants in single occupancy households where isolation is more absolute and it asks how caring for indoor plants (whose life depends on human provision of care) respond to the desire of nurturing life at times of widespread death. The aim is to expose the affective bonds created between humans and plants to account for vulnerability, intimacy, and resilience during social isolation. Read Giulias recent article on this topic for The Conversation 

Strand 3 (Teresa Degenhardt) COVID 19 impact on volunteering in Immigration Removal Centres (IRC) (in UK) explores the way in which volunteers provide and experience care to migrants and asylum seekers in detention centres in the current situation. Volunteers may be seen as attempting to establish friendship bonds with people who are excluded by our society. This project seeks to explore volunteers’ emotions while they bond with migrants in detention through phone or skype, and how they provide care, or evaluate migrant’s vulnerability in a context of great uncertainty.

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Corona virus representation

Covid-19 Research

Understanding Life in Lockdown for Autistic Young People

As COVID-19 and enforced lockdown takes hold, social science researchers are moving to the forefront in a bid to identify, understand and respond to the range of impacts on lived experiences. There has been little or no work to date which has considered the intersection of age and disability; that is, the impacts on and experiences of children and young people with disabilities. For children with disabilities, there is concern that lockdown is having significant implications. For example, children in mainstream schools who are registered as having special educational needs may no longer be able to access critical statutory and targeted support. 



 

Combined with changes to ‘normal’ routines, a transition to home-schooling and restricted movement, can be especially distressing for autistic young people. Learning support teams in schools are limited in the remote support they can provide to young people and are now attempting to develop guidance for parents supporting the home-schooling of autistic young people during lockdown. The dual role of parent and teacher becomes particularly challenging for parents who may have limited understanding of their child's educational experiences and the process by which learning is adjusted for each child on account of their specific learning needs. This is potentially exacerbated by the young autistic person's ability to identify or express the impact of lockdown restrictions on their capacity for coping with home learning.

This project seeks to explore the experiences and impacts of COVID-19 lockdown on autistic young people in post-primary education settings. Specifically: 

  • How do autistic young people feel about the current lockdown situation?
  • What challenges are autistic young people experiencing during lockdown?
  • What coping strategies have autistic young people developed during lockdown?
  • What would help autistic young people manage better in similar situations in future?
Outputs will be used to shape evidence-informed responses from education policymakers as well as schools, SENCOs and parents. 
 
For more information on the project please contact Dr Bronagh Byrne or Gillian Curran
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Health, Well Being and Inclusion

Rapid Evidence Review. The relationship between alcohol and mental health problems: Alcohol Change UK

The Rapid Evidence Assessment (REA) carried out by the team at QUB considered two primary research aims:
1. To examine the effectiveness of psychosocial and pharmacological interventions for adults (18+) with comorbid alcohol use and mental health problems.
2. To identify the general policy framework for co-occurring substance use disorders and Alcohol Use Disorders (AuDs), assessment models, care plans and guidelines for practice within the UK. In addition, there was a specific focus on models of treatment delivery within the UK and international contexts.

Find out more about this review at Alcohol Change UK 

 

Project Team

Dr Anne Campbell - Project lead (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Co-Investigators and Contributors at QUB

Dr Trisha Forbes (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Dr Aisling McLaughlin (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)
 
Professor Gavin Davidson (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)
 
Dr Michelle Butler (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)
 
Dr Carolyn Blair (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)
 
Dr Clare McKeaveney (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)
 
Norma Menabney (QUB)
 
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Health, Well Being and Inclusion

Variation and Determinants of Novel Psychoactive Substance (NPS) use

The harms associated with New Psychoactive Substances (NPS) present a major public health challenge. This project investigated usage of NPS to provide evidence on risks and potential protective factors. A mixed-methods design was used incorporating latent class analysis of the Belfast Youth Development Study (BYDS) and qualitative narrative interviews with people with experience of NPS use. Suggested interventions and treatments were made based on empirical findings which will have high relevance among those working to prevent harms of NPS use.

Report available from NIHR Journals Library: 

'Variation and Determinants of Novel Psychoactive Substance (NPS) Use: Potential Implications for Policy and Practice'

 

Project Team

Dr Kathryn Higgins - Project lead (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Co-Investigators and Contributors at QUB

Nina O’Neill (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Leanne O’Hara (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)
 
Julie-Ann Jordan (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)
 
Mark McCann (Uni of Glasgow)
 
 
 
 
Dr Anne Campbell (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)
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Discussion

Health, Well Being and Inclusion

Getting our voices heard

This DRILL funded project is led by Queen’s University Belfast in partnership with Action for Real Change UK, Compass Advocacy Network, NI; Praxis care, NI; Mencap Cyrmu, Wales; Richmond Fellowship, Scotland, and Ann Craft Trust, England, is exploring different approaches to exerting influence taken by people with learning disabilities and their organisations on the specific policy and practice subject of adult safeguarding.

 

Find out more about the project here 

 

Project Team

Dr Lorna Montgomery - Project lead (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Co-Investigators and Contributors at QUB

Professor Gavin Davidson (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Dr Berni Kelly (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Lisamarie Wood (Praxis NI)
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Health, Well Being and Inclusion

Building Better Futures

The ‘Building Better Futures’ (BBF) project aims to improve children’s outcomes by producing and evaluating an evidence based model of social work assessment intervention for children and families. It is part of the DoH Early Intervention Transformation scheme.

The QUB team, including Dr Lorna Montgomery and Dr Mandi MacDonald from SSESW, are completing a 4-year implementation and evaluation plan involving tiered roll-out of the model across all HSCT. This plan has had strong buy-in from the Health and Social Care Board, the Department of Health, senior staff and practitioners across the NI Trusts. A sustainability plan has been developed by each HSC Trust to embed the model as core practice with QUB staff continuing as special advisers.

 

Find out more about the project here 

 

 

Project Team

Dr Lorna Montgomery - Project lead (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Co-Investigators and Contributors

Dr Mandi MacDonald (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Professor Emeritus Stan Houston (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)


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Social Work

Health, Well Being and Inclusion

Psychological therapies for major depressive disorder and prolonged grief in bereaved adults

This Cochrane Fellowship started in November 2018 to complete a systematic review of psychological interventions for depression, prolonged grief disorder and PTSD in bereaved adults. The cause of death has been broadened to any type of death vs life limiting conditions, and is now exploring prolonged grief disorder and PTSD.

Dr Audrey Roulston is leading the team where the final review contains 13 different studies covering a range of psychological therapies, with the main intervention focusing on CBT. The project will inform therapists and service providers about which interventions are most effective with this population, and which RCTs were graded highly in terms of quality.

Find out more about the Protocol on the Cochrane library website.

Cochrane Library - Protocol

 

Project Team

Dr Audrey Roulston - Project lead (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Co-Investigators and Contributors

Professor Mike Clarke (Centre for Public Health, QUB)

Professor Michael Donnelly (Centre for Public Health, QUB)

Dr Bridget Candy (UCL/Marie Curie)

Dr Jenny McGaughey (School of Nursing and Midwifery, QUB)

Orla Keegan (Irish Hospice Foundation, Dublin)

Dr Michael Duffy (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)
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Health, Well Being and Inclusion

Virtual reality and immersive technology to support health and social care professional training

This project was funded, in 2018, by a MRC Proximity to discovery award and involved the development of a new Immersive Technologies and Digital Mental Health network at QUB which is led by Dr Paul Best from the School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work.

This network is trans-disciplinary partnership of academics, practitioners and technology companies focusing on therapeutic and pedagogical advances in mental health and social care through digital means. A particular focus of this work is to increase the accessibility and capacity of immersive technologies among social science researchers, educators and practitioners.

Related articles can be found on the CESI website and in Dr Paul Best's research profile

 

Project Team 

Dr Paul Best - Project lead (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Co-Investigators and Contributors

Dr Matilde Meireles (QUB)

Dr Franziska Schroeder (School of Arts, English and Languages, QUB) 

Dr Maarten Van Walstijn (School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, QUB)

Dr Lorna Montgomery  (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Dr Alan Maddock  (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Dr Anne Campbell (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Prof Gavin Davidson  (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Mr David Trainor (SentiReal Ltd) 

Dr Karen Galway (School of Nursing and Midwifery, QUB) 

Mr Paul Quinn  (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

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Children, Young people & Families: Policy and Practice

Speak Out, Stay Safe Evaluation

This project is a national evaluation of the NSPCC’s Speak Out, Stay Safe programme for primary school children across the UK. Speak Out, Stay Safe is a preventive intervention that aims to improve children’s understanding of abuse and other forms of harm, recognise the signs of abuse, how to get help, and the sources of help available to them. The evaluation is being carried out by a team of researchers based at several Universities across the United Kingdom, led by the University of Central Lancashire (England) and involving Queens University Belfast (Northern Ireland), Edinburgh University (Scotland), Bangor University (Wales) and the University of Greenwich (England).]

The evaluation has three elements: Impact evaluation, Process evaluation and Economic evaluation.

 



Impact evaluation (started Jan 2019): Exploring how children’s knowledge, understanding and recognition of abuse, neglect and bullying changes after they have taken part in the Speak Out, Stay Safe assemblies and workshops. This also investigates whether the programme improves children’s knowledge of who they can speak out and if it increases children's readiness to seek help if they or their friends experience abuse and neglect. Approx. 4,000 children will be involved in this evaluation from across 90 UK primary schools. 

Process evaluation This is running alongside the impact evaluation to explore how Speak Out, Stay Safe works and to understand what helps and hinders successful delivery. Interviews and focus groups are being carried out with pupils and school staff to discover their thoughts on the programme.

Economic evaluation This is assessing the full range of wider costs and outcomes associated with Speak Out, Stay Safe from a societal perspective. It is also exploring how cost-efficient the programme is.


Further information about the Speak Out, Stay Safe programme and the national evaluation can be found at: NSPCC: Speak Out, Stay Safe 

QUB Project Team

Dr David Hayes - Project lead (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Co-investigators and contributors

Dr Berni Kelly (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Dr Annemarie Millar (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

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Children, Young people & Families: Policy and Practice

Young Life & Times, Kids Life & Times

YLT is an annual postal survey among 16 year olds in Northern Ireland run by ARK since 2003 which asks young people at a crucial time in their lives about matters that affect them. 

KLT was established by ARK in 2008 because we felt that younger children were rarely routinely asked about matters that affect them, this is an online survey of all children in Northern Ireland in their final primary school year.

Young Life and Times (YLT)

Since 2003, YLT has covered issues such as education, young people’s rights, good relations, political attitudes, volunteering, mental health, sexual health, citizenship, physical activity and much more. Funding for YLT has come from a range of academic, statutory and voluntary sector organisations. YLT is used by government and district councils to monitor key policy indicators. More information about YLT, publications arising from YLT, the survey questions asked and the dataset can be accessed via the NILT website (www.ark.ac.uk/ylt).

Kids’ Life and Times (KLT)   

The final primary year is an important stage in a child’s life and the survey is an affirmation of his or her capacity to reflect on their lives and their school years to date.  The survey covers topics that are important to children today, including education, participation and their rights, play, physical activity, nature and internet safety. More information about KLT, publications arising from KLT, the survey questions asked and the dataset can be accessed via the KLT website (www.ark.ac.uk/klt).

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Police officer

Crime and Social Justice

Police Stops

This networking grant from the European Cooperation in Science and Technology funding organisation was awarded to Dr John Topping in 2018 and involved academics, practitioners and policy makers from across Europe to examine police stop and search practices. Police Stops are widely used and adopted by police forces as a means to control and prevent crime and terrorism. At the same time, the practice is experienced as intrusive and problematic, particularly among young men and minority ethnic communities. A practice that is intended to increase safety undermines trust and legitimacy.

 

As a result, the effectiveness of the practice is in doubt. Balancing these competing perspectives has prompted increasing scrutiny from civil society organisations and from legal and governing institutions in some European states. Yet the practices remain under-explored and little understood in many European states.

This Action aims to better understand Police Stops across Europe as practiced, experienced, and as they affect wider society, in order to inform the oversight and effectiveness of the practice.

Find out more about Dr John Toppings work on Police Stops and Police Stop and Search here.

Read about the recent Stop & Search Event at QUB on 4th September 2019

 

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Contested Societies

Northern Ireland Life and Times (NILT)

NILT is an annual attitudes survey of adults aged 18 years or older living across in Northern Ireland. NILT started in 1998 and has its roots in the Northern Ireland Social Attitudes Survey, which ran from 1989 to 1996. Each year the survey contains questions on a range of important social policy topics affecting people's lives.

The survey is used to monitor key government policies, as well as local government community plans.

Funding for NILT comes from different sources, including academic funders, government and civil society organisations. 

More information about NILT, publications arising from NILT, the survey questions asked, tables of results and the dataset can be accessed via the NILT website 

Project Team

Dr Paula Devine (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Co-investigators and Contributors

Dr Dirk Schubotz (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Mike McCool ARK IT Director, Ulster University 

ARK - Access Research Knowledge

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School children raising their hands

Contested Societies

Shared Education Network

In 2018 Professor Joanne Hughes, Director of the Centre for Shared Education and colleagues from the School of Psychology at Queen’s were awarded AHRC GCRF Network funding to build an international network of academics and other stakeholders to explore the potential for initiating and developing shared education in Balkan countries, and devise an interdisciplinary comparative research project.

The project established an academic network comprised of PhD students (QUB and Kosovo); post-doctoral contract research staff (QUB) alongside early careers and leading in-country academics, including 5 professors (BiH, N. Macedonia, Croatia and QUB) and 6 lecturers/SLs (BiH, QUB and N. Macedonia). 

 

Extending out from this core academic team, a strategic network of key educational stakeholders from the political, policy, and practice sectors in each of the five jurisdictions have participated and since 2017 a series of 7 within and between country knowledge exchange events (seminars, workshops, shared education site and in-country school visits) have been organized by the academic team leads, working together with network partners.

Project Team

Prof Joanne Hughes - Project lead (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Co-investigators and Contributors

Professor Rhiannon Turner, (School of Psychology, QUB)

Dr Dani Blaylock, (School of Psychology, QUB)

Professor Dinka Corkalo Biruski, University of Zagreb, Croatia

Edona Maloku, RIT, Kosovo

Professor Violeta Petroska-Beshka, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Skopje/Center for Human Rights and Conflict Resolution, Skopje

Dr Sabina Cehajic-Clancy, Sarajevo School of Science and Technology, Bosnia and Herzegovina

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Contested Societies

Developing the Principles of Loyalist Transition

In 2016, Professor John Brewer was awarded funding from the Irish Department of Foreign Affairs to develop a curriculum and workshop manual to assist Mr William Mitchell from ACT (Assisted Conflict Transformation) and various ACT branches to use with Loyalist community groups to engage with the strengths and weaknesses of Loyalism and improve Loyalist engagement with the peace process.

Project Team

Prof John Brewer - Project lead (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work and Senator George J Mitchell Institute, QUB)

Co-investigators and contributors

Professor Pete Shirlow, Liverpool University

Dr Cathal McManus (School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

 

The Senator George J Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security and Justice 

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Close up of students studying in McClay Library using laptops

Education

Digital Formative Assessment. A policy experimentation study across Europe

Commencing in 2019, Assess@Learning (A@L) is a four-year project funded by the Erasmus+ Key Action 3 Programme of the European Commission (€1.9m), coordinated by European Schoolnet with 5 Country Partners (Estonia, Finland, Greece, Spain and Portugal), researchers from IRVAPP (Italy), and Universities of Glasgow and Queens University Belfast.

The project involves a policy evaluation using an RCT design that will evaluate the implementation of digital formative assessment by teachers in secondary classrooms, and qualitative dialogue labs with educational professionals and students across the 5 countries involved. 

Find out more about EUN Assess@Learning

Project Team

Professor Jannette Elwood - Project lead (The School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work and AHSS Dean of Graduate Studies, QUB)

Co-Investigators and Contributors

Patricia Wastiau, EUN, Belgium

Katja Engelhardt, EUN, Belgium

Federico Pozzoni, Central European University

Viola Pinzi, EUN, Belgium

Anja Balanskat, EUN, Belgium

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Education

The rights of children with disabilities and the digital environment

The Council of Europe commissioned research in 2017 to investigate the experiences of children with disabilities within the digital environment from the perspective of their human rights. 

The study, with input from four advisory groups of children with disabilities in Northern Ireland, involved interviews and focus groups with over 90 children with a diverse range of disabilities in five European countries.

 

The Centre for Children’s Rights is working with international colleagues to examine children with disabilities’ views and experiences of their rights in an online environment under the light of the three “P’s” of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (participation, protection and provision).  Working with children and adults in advisory groups, it will develop participatory activities that will capture the experiences of children with a range of disabilities across four European countries.  It will produce recommendations on best practices for governments, professionals working with children, parents and the corporate sector; as well as child friendly versions of the report accessible to all the groups of children taking part.

Project Team

Professor Laura Lundy - Project lead (School of Social Science, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Co-Investigators and Contributors

Dr Bronagh Byrne (School of Social Science, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Gerison Lansdown, Independent Consultant

Michelle Templeton (School of Social Science, Education and Social Work, QUB)

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Girl reading a book at library stacks

Education

Whole Child Development Mapping across Western Europe and North America: The UK

In 2017 the American Institute for Research commissioned this research project, the report presents findings from the Whole Child Development project on organisations and schools undertaking whole child development in Western Europe and North America.

This report presents findings from the UK and will form part of larger report which is still in progress, this larger report will be based on the findings Western Europe and North America. 

 

Find out more about the findings from the UK  

UK Whole Child Mapping Report

Project team

Dr Alison MacKenzie - Project lead (The School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Co-investigators and contributors

Prof Allen Thurston (The School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Dr Joanne O'Keeffe (The School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

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image of a teacher helping a primary school pupil with their reading

Education

An efficacy randomized controlled trial of Reciprocal Reading in secondary schools

This project is a development/efficacy RCT of the 'Reciprocal Reading' programme in secondary schools commissioned by the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF).

The project is a workforce development program that supports Teachers and Teaching Assistants develop and deliver targeted reading comprehension instruction to high school students aged 11–13. The aim of the project is to improve overall literacy, reading accuracy and reading performance.

 

Related article can be found here

Project Team

Prof Allen Thurston - Project Lead (The School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Co-investigators and Contributors

Maria Cockerill (The School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Dr Joanne O’Keeffe (The School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work, QUB)

Tien-Hui Chiang, Zhengzhou University, China

Andy Taylor, Fischer Family Literacy Trust.

 

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