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Professional Nursing - Learning Disabilities Nursing

BSc|Undergraduate

Professional Nursing Learning Disabilities Nursing

Entry year
Academic Year 2023/24
Entry requirements
BCC/BBC
Duration
3 calendar years (Full Time)
UCAS code
B761
  • Overview

    This three-year degree programme integrates theory and practice, preparing our students to be world-class practitioners in the area of Learning Disability Nursing. Students in this programme will begin in September 2023.

    Students will spend 50 per cent of their time in University learning the latest nursing theory and clinical skills, and 50 per cent of their time with one of our internationally-recognised training partners in a wide variety of clinical and community settings throughout Northern Ireland.

    Our highly-trained lecturing staff are actively engaged in areas of speciality practice. Our personal tutor system for student support is very well regarded, and we were awarded the Best Student Experience award in the 2021 Student Nursing Times Awards.

    On successful completion of this programme of study, you will become a Registered Nurse in Learning Disabilities (RNLD) possessing a distinct set of knowledge, skills and expertise of the health and wider education and social care needs of people with learning disabilities and their families and carers in the context of person-centred care and co-production that promotes and maintains health and well-being.

    The Learning Disability Nurse adopts a life span approach to nursing assessment, treatments, interventions, education and care and support across a diverse range of settings, including, home, in-patient assessment and treatment units, nursing homes, secure settings, schools, day care, residential care homes and community-based teams to contribute to meeting the care needs of people with learning disabilities and their families and carers.

    On successful completion of this programme of study, you will be able to
    o Provide person centred care for people with Learning Disability and their families across the lifespan.
    o Deliver effective care to people with learning disabilities who may have multiple health morbidities and additional interrelated physical, psychological, emotional, social, and educational needs.
    o Be respectful, kind, caring, compassionate knowledgeable and skilled nurse practitioners.
    o Be effective communicators
    o Act as advocates for people with learning disabilities their families, health care professionals and other stakeholders within dynamic health and social care contexts

    This programme is fully funded by the Department of Health for Home students, including full fees and a bursary. Students on this programme are ineligible to apply for funding from the Student Loans Company. It is not available as a part time programme.

    If you have previously commenced or completed a DoH paid place/bursary for a pre-registration nursing, midwifery or AHP course in Northern Ireland you will not be eligible for a funded place on this programme.

    Already have a degree? Why not consider joining our Masters in Professional Nursing programme? This new and innovative 2 year programme that prepares graduates from any subject with experience in caring for a Nursing career.

    Professional Nursing Learning Disabilities Nursing Degree highlights

    Students may be eligible to have their fees paid by the Department of Health, (DoH), and may receive a bursary

    Professional Accreditations

    • Professional Registration with the NMC (2020) as a Learning Disabilities Nurse

    Career Development

    • Nurses and Midwives learn to be an integral part of a healthcare team. Within this School, multidisciplinary teams of medical students and nursing students work together using interprofessional learning scenarios.

    World Class Facilities

    • Learn and test your clinical skills through the use of state of the art simulation equipment.  Our revolutionary Intersim facilities, which opened in 2021, allow our educators to role play scenarios in response to the students' actions. This activity often takes place behind a one way mirror and provides the teaching team with the opportunity to observe and monitor the students' responses to the specific scenarios.

      Students work in multidisciplinary teams in our state-of-the-art simulation centre, using the latest technology for learning.
    The passion the staff have for LD nursing and the LD community is demonstrated with every lecture and tutorial they do. I am just about to finish my studies and I couldn't have made it through without them. Top class lecturers.
    NSS 2021
  • Course content

    Course Structure

    Stage 1You will be introduced to professional working alongside foundational knowledge and skills in Learning Disability Nursing to support you in implementing safe and effective person centred care. You will learn about the systems of the body, pharmacology and caring communication, as well as Public Health.

    You will support people with Learning Disabilities to manage their health and wellbeing across the lifespan, and develop critical thinking skills to apply to decision making in clinical practice.
    Stage 2You will consider the needs of people with learning disabilities across the lifespan and develop knowledge of positive behaviour support. You will develop and apply skills in assessing and planning care to manage mental ill health in people with learning disabilities. You will also gain insight into the criminal justice system and the ethical issues for people with learning disabilities. You will deepen your knowledge of bioscience and pharmacology, and develop the skills required to analyse and critically appraise evidence with a focus on quality improvement.
    Stage 3Leadership will be a key focus in this final year whilst managing complexity in sustaining the health and wellbeing of adults and older adults with learning disabilities and complex health needs. This will include the coordination of care to improve quality of life for the person with learning disabilities. You will have the opportunity to consolidate your learning in practice preparing you to enter the register as a Learning Disabilities Nurse

    People teaching you

    Mrs Susan Carlisle
    Director of Education

    School of Nursing & Midwifery

    Contact Teaching Times

    Personal Study60 (hours maximum)
    Students are expected to spend a considerable amount of time reading around the concepts so that they can come prepared to workshops and tutorials, able to debate and roleplay issues.
    Large Group Teaching4 (hours maximum)
    Lectures are used to introduce new concepts and theories to large groups. 100% attendance is mandatory for all timetabled classes.
    Small Group Teaching/Personal Tutorial9 (hours maximum)
    Students will engage in workshops and tutorials to explore the concepts introduced in lectures in greater detail, and apply them to real life scenarios
    Placement38 (hours maximum)
    Placements constitute 50% of this programme. When you are on placement you should expect to work a 37.5 hour week across a range of shift patterns determined by the placement provider.

    Learning and Teaching

    At Queen’s, we aim to deliver a high quality learning environment that embeds intellectual curiosity, innovation and best practice in learning, teaching and student support to enable student to achieve their full academic potential.

    On the BSc (Hons) in Professional Nursing we do this by providing a range of learning experiences which enable our students to engage with subject experts, develop attributes and perspectives that will equip them for life and work in a global society and make use of innovative technologies and a world class library that enhances their development as independent, lifelong learners. Examples of the opportunities provided for learning on this course are:

    • E-Learning technologies
      A range of e-learning experiences are embedded in the degree using the Learning Management system, Canvas. Other examples include: interactive group workshops in a flexible learning space, podcasts and interactive web-based learning activities.
    • Lectures
      Introduce basic information about new topics as a starting point for further self-directed private study/reading. Lectures also provide opportunities to ask questions, gain some feedback and advice on assessments (normally delivered in large groups to all year group peers).
    • Personal Tutor
      Undergraduates are allocated a Personal Tutor who meets with them on several occasions during each year to support their academic development.
    • Practical and Simulation Based Education
      Where you will have opportunities to develop technical skills and apply theoretical principles to real-life or practical contexts. All nursing students have opportunities to engage in interprofessional education (IPE) activities. You will be expected to attend 100% of classes within your nursing modules.
    • Self-directed study
      This is an essential part of life as a Queen’s student when important private reading, engagement with e-learning resources, reflection on feedback to date and research work for assignments is carried out.
    • Seminars/tutorials
      Significant amounts of teaching are carried out in small groups (typically 15-20 students). These provide an opportunity for students to engage with academic staff who have specialist knowledge of the topic, to ask questions of them and to assess your own progress and understanding with the support of peers. You should also expect to make presentations and other contributions to these groups.
    • Work Practice placements
      Students will undertake clinical placements regularly throughout the programme. This enhances the link from theory to practice in nursing and provides students with a wide variety of opportunities and experiences across a range of health and social care contexts. It is an essential component of the programme ensuring that the student has sufficient opportunities to develop skill and competence in care provision and decision making, meeting the requirements for professional registration as a Learning Disability Nurse with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC 2020).

      Placements in Learning Disability Nursing can be anywhere in Northern Ireland; students should expect to travel to placements. When on placements every student is assigned a supervisor, who is trained in teaching within the clinical setting, and will work alongside them regardless of that person’s shift pattern. Students should expect to work night shifts and/or long days on a regular basis while on placement.

    Assessment

    Details of assessments associated with this course are outlined below:

    • The way in which you are assessed will vary according to the learning objectives of each module. Modules are assessed through a variety of assessments that may include assignments, project work, presentations or examinations. Details of how each module is assessed are shown in the Module Handbook which is provided to all students at the start of each module.

    Feedback

    As students progress through their course at Queen’s they will receive general and specific feedback about their work from a variety of sources including lecturers, module co-ordinators, placement supervisors, personal tutors, advisers of study and peers. University students are expected to engage with reflective practice and to use this approach to improve the quality of their work. Feedback may be provided in a variety of forms including:

    • Feedback provided via formal written comments and marks relating to work that you, as an individual or as part of a group, have submitted
    • Face to face comment. This may include occasions when you make use of the lecturers’ advertised “office hours” to help you to address a specific query
    • Placement employer comments or references
    • Online or emailed comment
    • General comments or question and answer opportunities at the end of a lecture, seminar or tutorial.
    • Pre-submission advice regarding the standards you should aim for and common pitfalls to avoid. In some instances, this may be provided in the form of model answers or exemplars which you can review in your own time
    • Feedback and outcomes from practical classes
    • Comment and guidance provided by staff from specialist support services such as Careers, Employability and Skills or the Learning Development Service
    • Once you have reviewed your feedback, you will be encouraged to identify and implement further improvements to the quality of your work.

    Facilities

    Students have access to our cutting edge simulation and clinical skills suite, where they can learn and practice skills in a safe environment.
    http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/SchoolofNursingandMidwifery/Facilities/

    PREV
    Overview

  • Modules

    Modules

    The information below is intended as an example only, featuring module details for the current year of study. Modules are reviewed on an annual basis and may be subject to future changes – revised details will be published through Programme Specifications ahead of each academic year.

    • Year 1
      • Professionalism in Nursing
        Overview

        This module will cover the essential knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviours required to demonstrate accountability by nurses in all care settings.

        This includes: introduction to the four fields of nursing; person-centred care; values based nursing care; understanding wellness; compassion, empathy; appropriate communication and ensuring equality and diversity is respected across vulnerable populations.


        Students from all fields of nursing will demonstrate understanding of the NMC Code using ethical, legal and moral principles as applied to the practice of nursing including safeguarding principles. The importance of self-care will be addressed enabling students to creatively analyse their personal value, build on self-esteem and be proactive regarding support systems.
        Students will be introduced to reflective models in preparation for reflective activity in practice

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Demonstrate professional behaviour, attitudes and values towards all
        individuals as outlined in the Code
        2. Promoting Equality and Diversity through communication when caring
        for adults/children/those with learning disabilities and/or mental health
        needs and their families
        3. Reflect how safety, compassion, dignity and holistic care needs of all
        individuals are met
        4. Develop an awareness of ethical, legal and moral principles as applied
        to the practice of nursing
        5. Identify the importance of inter professional working and how this
        impacts on care delivery

        Skills

        Communication skills
        Debating skills
        Ability to use role play as a teaching tool
        Reflective skills

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in all online activities.

        Achievement of at least 40% in each assessed element in order to pass the module. There is no compensation between elements.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        NFM1120

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        18 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Evidence Based Nursing 1
        Overview

        The student will be introduced to the concept of evidence based practice and how this can be used to improve the quality and safety of person centred care. They will be encouraged to develop an inquiring mind in how to assess quality care through searching online databases and making judgements on best evidence.

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Explore the rationale for developing the evidence base for professional
        practice in nursing
        2. Demonstrate skills for searching and retrieving evidence
        3. Reflect on how the evidence base might be applied to care decisions in
        nursing practice

        Skills

        Data base searching
        Review of evidence
        Inquiry skills

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in all online activities.

        Achievement of at least 40% in each assessed element in order to pass the module. There is no compensation between elements.

        Continuous assessment: student will have achieved 50% completion at a specified mid point to enable the student to proceed to the next assessment point.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        10

        Module Code

        NFM1121

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        8 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Essential Life Science and Foundations of Pharmacology
        Overview

        Students will be introduced to the following principles in relation to how each system is influenced by development and changes across the lifespan:
        Principles of biological Science and terminology; Introduction to tissue, cell and fluid homeostasis; Introduction to human life sciences from biochemical mechanisms to whole body systems including development and changes across the lifespan: cardiovascular system in homeostasis and role of environment; renal system and fluid homeostasis; respiratory system; musculoskeletal system; nervous system; endocrine system; the immune system and immune resilience; integumentary system; gastrointestinal system; reproductive system each system will include
        Introduction to pharmacology: pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics.

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Outline the principles and processes of homeostasis
        2. Recognition of the biological changes across the lifespan
        3. Explain the physiological basis of clinical observations and tests
        4. Make use of anatomical and scientific terminology to promote safety in
        clinical practice
        5. Relate general pharmacological principles relevant to clinical practice
        and promoting safety in medicines management

        Skills

        To understand the foundational knowledge of life sciences through the study of cells, tissues, organs and systems

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in all online activities.

        Achievement of at least 40% in each assessed element in order to pass the module.

        There is no compensation between elements.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        NFM1122

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        36 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Caring Communication in Nursing
        Overview

        The student will demonstrate understanding in a range of communication skills that are integral to person centred care across all fields. The application, appropriateness and value of these skills will be explored within each field of practice and students given an opportunity to practice these in class. Students will be given the opportunity to appraise each other’s communication skills to promote self reflection and develop the capacity to provide constructive feedback as part of a supervisory role.

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Demonstrate knowledge and core principles of effective communication
        including self-awareness of personal communication
        2. Choose and demonstrate best practice in a caring and compassionate
        communication approaches
        3. Reflect on communication skills of self and others

        Skills

        Communication skills Annexe A
        1. Underpinning communication skills for assessing, planning, providing and managing best practice, evidence-based nursing care:
        1.1 actively listen, recognise and respond to verbal and non-verbal cues
        1.2 use prompts and positive verbal and non-verbal reinforcement
        1.3 use appropriate non-verbal communication including touch, eye contact and personal space
        1.4 make appropriate use of open and closed questioning
        1.5 use caring conversation techniques
        1.6 check understanding and use clarification techniques
        1.7 be aware of own unconscious bias in communication encounters
        1.9 confidently and clearly present and share verbal and written reports with individuals and groups
        1.12 recognise the need for, and facilitate access to, translator services and material.
        2. Evidence-based, best practice approaches to communication for supporting people of all ages, their families and carers in preventing ill health and in managing their care
        2.1 share information and check understanding about the causes, implications and treatment of a range of common health conditions including anxiety, depression, memory loss, diabetes, dementia, respiratory disease, cardiac disease, neurological disease, cancer, skin problems, immune deficiencies, psychosis, stroke and arthritis
        2.2 use clear language and appropriate, written materials, making reasonable adjustments where appropriate in order to optimise people’s understanding of what has caused their health condition and the implications of their care and treatment
        2.3 recognise and accommodate sensory impairments during all communications
        2.5 identify the need for and manage a range of alternative communication techniques 2.6 use repetition and positive reinforcement strategies
        3. Evidence-based, best practice communication skills and approaches for providing therapeutic interventions such as
        3.1 motivational interviewing;
        3.2 solution focused therapies;
        3.3 reminiscence therapies;
        3.4 talking therapies;
        3.5 de-escalation strategies and techniques;
        3.7 play therapy;
        3.8 distraction and diversion techniques

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in all online activities.

        Achievement of at least 40% in each assessed element in order to pass the module.

        There is no compensation between elements.

        Completion of video of communication style.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        10

        Module Code

        NFM1123

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        5 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Public Health Perspectives
        Overview

        Students will explore how health is conceptualised locally and globally. They will demonstrate understanding of the role of public health in maintaining the health of individuals and communities including vulnerable populations with specific health needs.

        The following themes will be covered:
        Sociological and psychological theories: social determinants of health and lifestyle factors; behaviour/ attitude change; lifecourse perspective.
        Levels of prevention: strength based approaches, health screening, vaccinations, health checks for specific populations.
        Equality and diversity: health literacy; impact of culture and ethnicity; resilience of individuals, families and communities.

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Describe how health is conceptualised and how public health is
        monitored, measured and reflected in local, national and global policies,
        2. Explain the role of the nurse in promoting and protecting health of
        themselves and others
        3. Explore public health challenges across the life course and identify
        strategies that build resilience in individuals, families and communities
        4. Examine the range of factors leading to social inequalities and how
        these impact on vulnerable populations
        5. Examine factors such as health literacy, use of digital systems,
        individual circumstances, behaviours and lifestyle choices contributing
        to individual health outcomes
        6. Demonstrate an understanding of health promotion models and
        strategies when choosing appropriate interventions to promote health
        with individuals.

        Skills

        Annexe A:
        1.1 actively listen, recognise and respond to verbal and non-verbal cues
        1.2 use prompts and positive verbal and non-verbal reinforcement
        1.3 use appropriate non-verbal communication including touch, eye contact and personal space
        1.4 make appropriate use of open and closed questioning
        1.5 use caring conversation techniques
        1.6 check understanding and use clarification techniques
        1.7 be aware of own unconscious bias in communication encounters
        1.8 write accurate, clear, legible records and documentation
        1.9 confidently and clearly present and share verbal and written reports with individuals and groups
        1.10 analyse and clearly record and share digital information and data
        1.12 recognise the need for, and facilitate access to, translator services and material.
        2.1 share information and check understanding about the causes, implications and treatment of a range of common health conditions including anxiety, depression, memory loss, diabetes, dementia, respiratory disease, cardiac disease, neurological disease, cancer, skin problems, immune deficiencies, psychosis, stroke and arthritis
        2.2 use clear language and appropriate, written materials, making reasonable adjustments where appropriate in order to optimise people’s understanding of what has caused their health condition and the implications of their care and treatment
        2.3 recognise and accommodate sensory impairments during all communications
        2.5 identify the need for and manage a range of alternative communication techniques
        2.6 use repetition and positive reinforcement strategies
        2.7 assess motivation and capacity for behaviour change and clearly explain cause and effect relationships related to common health risk behaviours including smoking, obesity, sexual practice, alcohol and substance use
        2.8 provide information and explanation to people, families and carers and respond to questions about their treatment and care and possible ways of preventing ill health to enhance understanding

        Evidence-based, best practice communication skills and approaches
        for providing therapeutic interventions
        3.1 motivational interview techniques
        3.2 solution focused therapies

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in all online activities.

        Achievement of at least 40% in each assessed element in order to pass the module.

        There is no compensation between elements.

        Completion of seminar delivery.

        Coursework

        10%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        90%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        NFM1124

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        8 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Foundation of Learning Disabilities Nursing
        Overview

        Students will develop insight into understanding the roles of the Learning Disabilities nurse in relation to supporting people with learning disabilities, families and carers. This includes:
        What is Learning Disabilities: Causes of Learning Disabilities; Levels of disability; Cultured beliefs including diversity and inclusion across the lifespan; patterns of health and wellness for people with Learning Disabilities
        Person centred diagnosis and assessment: diversity/ethnic groups ; co-production (goals/objectives); Language; Seeing individual; Capacity and consent; safeguarding; Family involvement; reasonable adjustments
        Interdisciplinary team working: roles and services in Northern Ireland

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Understand the concept of LD across the lifespan across the lifespan and
        identify the impact on individual, family and carers.
        2. Understand wellness and how this looks for the person within LD through
        a person centred assessment.
        3. Recognise the factors and barriers to inclusion of people within LD
        across the lifespan families and carers.
        4. Demonstrate appropriate communication while reflecting on compassion,
        empathy and caring skills.
        5. Explore the roles of LD nurse in promoting health and wellbeing, equality
        and inclusion as part of an interprofessional team.

        Skills

        Students will develop awareness and understanding of the needs of people
        with learning disabilities across the lifespan, patterns of health and
        wellness and factors effecting quality of care and support and inclusion and
        the impact on families and carers and the role of other professionals in the
        provision of care and support.

        Annexe A:
        1. Underpinning communication skills for assessing, planning, providing
        and managing best practice, evidence-based nursing care
        2.1 share information and check understanding about the causes,
        implications and treatment of a range of common health conditions
        including anxiety, depression, memory loss, diabetes, dementia,
        respiratory disease, cardiac disease, neurological disease, cancer,
        skin problems, immune deficiencies, psychosis, stroke and arthritis
        2.2 use clear language and appropriate, written materials, making reasonable adjustments where appropriate in order to optimise people’s understanding of what has caused their health condition and the implications of their care and treatment
        2.3 recognise and accommodate sensory impairments during all communications
        2.4 support and manage the use of personal communication aids
        2.5 identify the need for and manage a range of alternative communication techniques

        Annexe B:
        2.1 take, record and interpret vital signs manually and via technological devices
        2.6 accurately measure weight and height, calculate body mass index and recognise healthy ranges and clinically significant low/high readings
        2.7 undertake a whole body systems assessment including respiratory, circulatory, neurological, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and skin status
        2.9 collect and observe sputum, urine, stool and vomit specimens, undertaking routine analysis and interpreting findings
        2.11 recognise and respond to signs of all forms of abuse
        2.13 identify and respond to signs of deterioration and sepsis
        2.14 administer basic mental health first aid
        2.15 administer basic physical first aid
        2.16 recognise and manage seizures, choking and anaphylaxis, providing appropriate basic life support
        2.17 recognise and respond to challenging behaviour, providing appropriate safe holding and restraint.
        3. Use evidence-based, best practice approaches for meeting needs for care and support with rest, sleep, comfort and the maintenance of dignity, accurately assessing the person’s capacity for independence and self-care and initiating appropriate interventions 3.1-3.6
        4.1 observe, assess and optimise skin and hygiene status and determine the need for support and intervention
        4.2 use contemporary approaches to the assessment of skin integrity and use appropriate products to prevent or manage skin breakdown
        4.3 assess needs for and provide appropriate assistance with washing, bathing, shaving and dressing
        4.4 identify and manage skin irritations and rashes
        4.5 assess needs for and provide appropriate oral, dental, eye and nail care and decide when an onward referral is needed
        4.8 assess, respond and effectively manage pyrexia and hypothermia.
        5.1 observe, assess and optimise nutrition and hydration status and determine the need for intervention and support
        5.2 use contemporary nutritional assessment tools
        5.3 assist with feeding and drinking and use appropriate feeding and drinking aids
        5.4 record fluid intake and output and identify, respond to and manage dehydration or fluid retention
        5.5 identify, respond to and manage nausea and vomiting
        6.1 observe and assess level of urinary and bowel continence to determine the need for support and intervention assisting with toileting, maintaining dignity and privacy and managing the use of appropriate aids
        6.4 assess bladder and bowel patterns to identify and respond to constipation, diarrhoea and urinary and faecal retention
        7.1-7.4 Use evidence-based, best practice approaches for meeting needs for care and support with mobility and safety, accurately assessing the person’s capacity for independence and self-care and initiating appropriate interventions
        8.1 observe and assess the need for intervention and respond to restlessness, agitation and breathlessness using appropriate interventions
        8.2 manage the administration of oxygen using a range of routes and best practice approaches
        8.3 take and interpret peak flow and oximetry measurements
        8.5 manage inhalation, humidifier and nebuliser devices
        8.6 manage airway and respiratory processes and equipment.
        9.1 observe, assess and respond rapidly to potential infection risks using best practice guidelines
        9.2 use standard precautions protocols
        9.3 use effective aseptic, non-touch techniques
        9.4 use appropriate personal protection equipment
        9.5 implement isolation procedures
        9.6 use evidence-based hand hygiene techniques
        9.7 safely decontaminate equipment and environment
        9.8 safely use and dispose of waste, laundry and sharps
        11.2 recognise the various procedural routes under which medicines can be prescribed, supplied, dispensed and administered; and the laws, policies, regulations and guidance that underpin them
        11.4 undertake accurate drug calculations for a range of medications
        11.5 undertake accurate checks, including transcription and titration, of any direction to supply or administer a medicinal product
        11.6 exercise professional accountability in ensuring the safe administration of medicines to those receiving care
        11.8 administer medications using a range of routes
        11.10 recognise and respond to adverse or abnormal reactions to medications
        11.11 undertake safe storage, transportation and disposal of medicinal products.

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in all online activities. Attendance at all practice placements.

        Achievement of at least 40% in each assessed element in order to pass the module. There is no compensation between elements.

        Students must pass both clinical and academic assessments to pass module

        Coursework

        0%

        Written

        100%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        40

        Module Code

        NLD1126

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        36 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Safe Medicate 1
        Overview

        This module provides essential numeracy and problem solving skills that underpin medication dosage calculations preparing students for safe clinical practice. Using the Safe medicate is a NMC approved online platform students complete interactive exercises and practice assessments similar to solving dosage calculation problems in the real world. Students have their individual online account which provides a record of their achievement across the Programme. This information is accessible only to students and the university.

        This software has a formative built in assessment that students have to complete to progress to the summative assessment.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of Safe Medicate1 students will be able to:
        1. Understand the essential clinical features of medication dosage and rate
        problems.
        2. Demonstrate problem-solving skills required to accurately calculate
        medication dosages
        3. Assess and evaluate their learning and competence development in
        drug calculations.

        Skills

        Numeracy
        Calculations
        Problem solving

        Assessment

        100% pass rate
        Students must pass in Year 1 to progress to Year 2

        Coursework

        0%

        Written

        100%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        0

        Module Code

        NFM1125

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        18 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

    • Year 2
      • Evidence Based Nursing 2
        Overview

        This module will enable students to consider how to appraise the evidence based literature in relation to improving the quality and safety of practice. Students will be encouraged to review practice using quality literature and best practice guidance as offered through for example NICE or Cochrane Reviews. Students will review a range of contemporary quality improvement models and how the nurse may implement these to improve quality and safety of practice.

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Develop critical appraisal skills for a range of evidence types.
        2. Compare and contrast the use of established quality improvement
        cycles in health care.
        3. Articulate the role of the nurse as an agent of change using quality
        improvement methods

        Skills

        Critical appraisal skills
        Interpret and evaluate quality improvement methodologies and reflect as to how these can inform nursing interventions, care and practice.

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in all online activities.

        Achievement of at least 40% in each assessed element in order to pass the module. There is no compensation between elements

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        10

        Module Code

        NSY2121

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        5 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Essential Pharmacology
        Overview

        Students in all fields of nursing will recognise the journey of a prescription from the assessment process with the patient, to prescribing partnership, supply, storage, dispensing and administration of that medication. They will gain an understanding of the families of drugs applied across the lifespan, consider the therapeutic and adverse effects of those medications and identify factors that could modify patients’ responses to medication. They will consider the law, their own accountability and the national and local policies that underpin this process. This will include an understanding drug calculations, transcription, titration and safe administration of the medication by whatever route. They will demonstrate an understanding of the different routes of administration.

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of families of drugs applied across the lifespan
        2. Interpret responses to administered medications including therapeutic and adverse effects including factors that could modify patients’
        responses to medication
        3. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the processes involved in ensuring drug safety and medicines optimisation

        Skills

        1. Undertake accurate drug calculations for a range of medications for a
        range of medications (Annex B 11.4)
        2. Undertake accurate checks, including transcription and titration, of any
        direction to supply or administer a medicinal product (Annex B 11.5)
        3. Exercise professional accountability in ensuring the safe administration
        of medicines to those receiving care (Annex B 11.6)
        4. Administer medications using a range of routes (Annex B 11.8)
        5. Administer and monitor medications using vascular access devices and
        enteral equipment (Annex B 11.9)
        6. Recognise and respond to adverse of abnormal reactions to
        medications (Annex B 11.10)
        7. Undertake safe storage, transportation and disposal of medicinal
        products (Annex B 11.11).

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in all online activities.

        Achievement of at least 40% (BSc) 50% (MSc) in each assessed element in order to pass the module. There is no compensation between elements.

        Coursework

        0%

        Written

        100%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        10

        Module Code

        NSY2123

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        8 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Applied Life Science
        Overview

        Students wild develop confidence in bioscience knowledge, competence in integrating biosciences in evidence informed clinical decision making and care, and communication with multiprofessional teams and patients. The following themes will be examined: Genomic information; pathophysiology of cell adaptation, injury and death; risk factors, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations and management of disease; Interpret signs, symptoms and clinical data to inform the assessment of individual; application of anatomical and scientific terminology to promote safety in clinical practice.

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Understand the different ways in which genomic information can
        influence the care of individuals and communities
        2. Explain the pathophysiology of cell adaptation, injury and death
        3. Apply the knowledge of pathophysiological processes to explain risk
        factors, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of disease
        4. Interpret signs, symptoms and clinical data to inform the assessment of
        individuals
        5. Apply anatomical and scientific terminology to promote safety in clinical
        practice

        Skills

        Risk assessment
        Clinical assessment

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in all online activities.

        Coursework

        0%

        Written

        100%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        NSY2122

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Working Interprofessionally to Improve Mental Wellbeing
        Overview

        Students from all fields of practice will consider the issues of mental wellbeing and what to do when a person’s mental well being might be compromised. They will achieve this by exploring the following themes:

        Self awareness and mental health: reflection on behaviours and healthy coping mechanisms for stressful events including peer support;

        Attitudes towards mental health and mental illness: concepts of mental wellbeing and use of language when referring to mental health; Challenge stigma

        Mental health assessment: A stepped care model for adults; children and families; people with a learning disability; Understand the drivers for suicide and self-harm; Questioning techniques to elicits feelings and ability to demystify why people feel the way they do; Specific behavioural and cognitive psychotherapeutic techniques; eg. NICE recommended psychological interventions;

        Team working: Assessing risk of harm including suicide for adults, children and people with learning disability; early intervention

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Examine and critique the concept of mental illness and mental wellbeing
        including issues of stigma and language in promoting mental wellbeing
        2. Analyse language used by professionals in describing mental health and
        how to promote positive language in teams
        3. Examine and apply strategies to promote mental wellbeing for clients in
        your care
        4. Interpret signs that might indicate those at risk of self harm or suicide,
        relevant coping mechanism and identify appropriate actions
        5. Examine how working effectively in teams with other nurses and
        professionals can contribute to improved outcomes for individuals,
        families and communities

        Skills

        Annexe A
        1.6 check understanding and use clarification techniques
        1.7 be aware of own unconscious bias in communication encounters
        3. Evidence-based, best practice communication skills and approaches for providing therapeutic interventions such as
        3.1 motivational interviewing,
        3.2 solution focused therapies,
        3.4 talking therapies;
        3.5 de-escalation strategies and techniques;
        3.6 cognitive behavioural therapy techniques
        3.8 distraction and diversion techniques
        3.9 positive behaviour support approaches

        Demonstrate effective person and team management through the use of:
        4.2.1 strengths based approaches to developing teams and managing change
        4.2.2 active listening when dealing with team members’ concerns and anxieties
        4.2.3 a calm presence when dealing with conflict
        4.2.4 appropriate and effective confrontation strategies
        4.2.5 de-escalation strategies and techniques when dealing with conflict
        4.2.6 effective co-ordination and navigation skills through: 4.2.6.1 appropriate negotiation strategies
        4.2.6.2 appropriate escalation procedures
        4.2.6.3 appropriate approaches to advocacy.

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in all online activities.

        Achievement of at least 40% in the assessed element in order to pass the module.

        Completion of video.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        NSY2124

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        8 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Nursing People with Learning Disabilities across the Lifespan with Psychological & Behavioural Needs
        Overview

        Students will develop knowledge and skills in the assessment, planning and management of psychological and behavioural needs of people with Learning Disabilities in a range of contexts. These will include:

        Person centred care: management of ill health; mental health; APIE
        Understanding of behaviour: Physical/communication/diagnostic overshadowing/functions of behaviour; types of assessments; legal and ethical issues; safeguarding; capacity and consent

        Management strategies: self-management: role of families and support required; non pharmacological therapies; MAPA; DOLS; MHD

        Working with other professionals e.g.: Department of justice- court/hospital order; Information sharing; record keeping; documentation; safeguarding.

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Examine the physical and psychological needs of people with Learning
        Disabilities
        2. Identify how the learning disability nurse demonstrates a person-centred
        approach to the assessment, planning, management and support of
        psychological needs and behavioural concerns using principles of co-
        production by working collaboratively with people with learning
        disabilities, their families, carers and other professionals.
        3. Examine pharmacology and medication management and people with
        Learning Disabilities
        4. Examine therapies in supporting the psychological needs with people
        with Learning Disabilities and families and carers
        5. Explore legal and ethical issues including safeguarding affecting people
        with Learning Disabilities in the criminal justice system.

        Skills

        1. delivering person-centred care (Annex A: 3.9)
        2. delivering psychological and emotional care to individuals, families, relatives and carers (Annex A: 3.6)
        3. Recognising and assessing a person’s cognitive health status and wellbeing (Annex B: 1.1.2)
        4. Assessing mental health and wellbeing status using appropriate tools/framework(s) (Annex B: 1.1)
        5. Taking a history (Annex B, point 1)
        6. Identifying, implementing and supporting quality of life promoting interventions (Annex A: 2.6)
        7. Understanding regional, interdisciplinary legislative and care pathways for mental health and forensics in learning disability healthcare (Annex B: 1.1, 2.17)
        8. Demonstrating the principles of forensic risk assessment, and undertaking case formulations (Annex B: 2.17)
        9. Identifying restrictive practices when responding to dangerous, violent or aggressive behaviour (Annex B: 2.17)
        10. Administering basic mental health first aid (Annex B: 2.14)
        11. Identifying and responding to side-effects of antipsychotic medication (Annex B: 11.10)
        12. Recognising and responding to challenging behaviour providing appropriate safe holding and restraint (Annex B: 2.17)
        13. Accurately assessing the person’s capacity for independence and self-care (Annex B: 3)
        14. Assessing and managing comfort and pain levels (Annex B: 3.5)
        15. Reducing fatigue, minimising insomnia, improving rest and comfort (Annex B: 3.6)
        16. recognising and responding to signs of all forms of abuse (Annex B: 2.11)
        17. understanding, organising and disseminating complex information about the causes, implications and treatment of a range of common mental health conditions including anxiety, depression, dementia, neurological disease, and psychosi (annex A: 2.1)
        18. Understanding and implementing planned communication strategies and supports which aid interpersonal communication (e.g. PECS, Makaton, etc.) (Annex A: 2.4)
        19. Assesses motivation and capacity for behaviour change and clearly explains cause and effect relationships related to common health risk behaviours including smoking, obesity, sexual practice, alcohol and substance use (Annex A: 2.7)
        20. Using motivational interviewing techniques effectively and appropriately (Annex A: 3.1)
        21. undertaking, responding to, and interpreting neurological assessments and observations (Annex B: 2.12)
        22. identifying and responding to signs of deterioration (Annex B: 2.13)
        23. timely escalation or reduction of care (Annex B: 1.11)
        24. Observing and assessing the need for intervention for people, families and carers (Annex B: 10, 2.7)
        25. Exercising accountability in ensuring the safe administration of medicines (Annex B: 11.6)

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in all online activities.

        Achievement of at least 40% in each assessed element in order to pass the module. There is no compensation between elements.

        Coursework

        0%

        Written

        100%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        NLD2129

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        5 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Nursing Children and Young People with Neuro Developmental Disabilities and Genetic Conditions
        Overview

        Students will develop an understanding of neuro developmental disabilities and genetic conditions of children and young people with Learning Disabilities, their families and carers:
        Theoretical knowledge: neuro development; genetic conditions; diagnosis, late screening, diagnosis later in life; Legal and ethical issues; safeguarding; life limiting conditions and palliative care; support for families, respite needs and services; Rights to education, children’s rights
        Family and child centred assessment and management: Assessment tools – range; Pain assessment; Consent and capacity; ADHD screening Alternative therapy, play communication; constraint/restrictive practice; toilet training, continence skills, task teaching; transitions school- adult; Reasonable adjustments; ethnicity and cultural adaptations
        Partnership working: MDT other disciplines, CCN school nurses; psychologists. H.V. CAMHS team

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Identify and assess the needs of children with LD and their families and
        carers.
        2. Explore the legal and ethical issues including safeguarding of service
        provision for children and young people with LD and long term needs
        3. Working partnership with families and community support service
        involved with child health, well being and protection.
        4. Explore the roles of LD nurse in person centred care and health
        promotion
        5. Evaluate methods of facilitating collaborative inclusive and integrative
        pathways including principles of coproduction.

        Skills

        1. Accurately assessing people of all ages using regional assessment documentation (Annex B, point 1)
        2. Taking a history (Annex B, point 1)
        3. Recognising signs of physical ill health, mental and emotional distress; vulnerability including agitation, aggression and challenging behaviour (Annex B: 1.1.1, 1.1.5, 1.2.1, 1.2.2)
        4. Recognising and responding to challenging behaviour providing appropriate safe holding and restraint (Annex B: 2.17)
        5. calculating body mass index in accordance with height and weight, recognising healthy ranges and clinically significant low/high readings (Annex B: 2.6)
        6. Recognising signs and symptoms of deterioration, physical ill health, physical distress (Annex B: 1.2, 1.2.1, 1.2.2, 1.2.3)
        7.
        8. Accurately assessing the person’s capacity for independence and self-care (Annex B: 3)
        9. Appropriately implementing play therapy (Annex A:3.7)
        10. Assessing and managing comfort and pain levels (Annex B: 3.5)
        11. Reducing fatigue, minimising insomnia, improving rest and comfort (Annex B: 3.6)
        12. effective wound care management, aseptic technique, wound drainage processes, informed and correct choice of appropriate dressings, pressure bandaging and vacuum closures (Annex B: 4.6)
        13. suture removal (Annex B: 4.6)
        14. addressing when an onward referral is needed (Annex B: 4.5)
        15. assessment of skin integrity and using appropriate products to prevent or manage skin breakdown (Annex B: 4.2)
        16. Using aseptic technique when managing wound and drainage processes (4.7)
        17. Meeting needs for care and support with bladder and bowel health
        18. Assessing the person’s capacity for independence and self-care with bladder and bowel health (Annex B: 6)
        19. Undertaking a whole body systems assessment including respiratory, circulatory, neurological musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and skin status. The assessment will encompass use of relevant assessment tools (Annex B: 2.7)
        20. Responding to constipation, urinary retention and faecal retention (6.4)
        21. Selecting and using appropriate continence products: insertion of urinary catheters, removal of urinary catheters, assist with self-catheterisation (Annex B: 6.2)
        22. Undertaking stoma care, identifying and using appropriate products and approaches (Annex B: 6.6)
        23. Identifying potential infection risks in wounds, leg ulcers using best practice guidelines (Annex B: 9.1)
        24. implementing standard precautions protocols, aseptic, non-touch techniques, appropriate personal protection equipment when delivering care and support with the prevention and management of infection (Annex B: 9, 9.2, 9.3, 9.4)
        25. appropriately implementing isolation procedure (Annex B: 9.5)
        26. assessing nutritional needs of patients using recognised risk assessment tool (Annex B: 5.1, 5.2,5.3,5.4,5.5,)
        27. managing artificial nutrition and hydration using oral, enteral and parenteral routes (Annex B: 5.7)
        28. Identifying and managing risk of falls using best practice risk assessment approaches (Annex B: 7.1,7.3,7.4)
        29. Using a range of contemporary moving and handling techniques, mobility aids and equipment to support people with impaired mobility (Annex B: 7.2)
        30. Observing and assessing the need for intervention for people, families and carers (Annex B: 10.1)
        31. Responding appropriately to uncontrolled symptoms of pain, nausea, thirst, constipation, restlessness, agitation, anxiety, epilepsy and depression (Annex B: 10.1)
        32. appropriate action to reduce or minimise pain (annex B: 3.5)
        33. Recognising and managing seizures, choking and anaphylaxis, providing appropriate basic life support (Annex B: 2.7)
        34. Providing appropriate support to children or young people, and their families who are transitioning through care systems (Annex A: 2)
        35. Continued assessments of people receiving care and their ability to self-administer own medications (Annex B: 11.1)
        36. Exercising accountability in ensuring the safe administration of medicines (Annex B: 11.6)
        37. Administering injections using IM, S/c, intradermal and Intravenous routes (Annex B: 11. 7)
        38. Assessing and reviewing preferences and care priorities of the dying person and their family and carers (Annex 10, 2.7)

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in all online activities. Attendance at all practice placements.

        Achievement of at least 40% in each assessed element in order to pass the module. There is no compensation between elements.

        Students must pass both clinical and academic assessments to pass module.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        40

        Module Code

        NLD2128

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        36 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Safe Medicate 2 - Learning Disabilities
        Overview

        This module provides increasingly complex numeracy and problem solving skills that underpin medication dosage calculations preparing students for safe clinical practice. Using the Safe medicate is a NMC approved online platform students complete interactive exercises and practice assessments similar to solving dosage calculation problems in the real world. Students have their individual online account which provides a record of their achievement across the Programme. This information is accessible only to students and the university.

        This software has a formative built in assessment that students have to complete to progress to the summative assessment.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of safeMedicate1 students will be able to:
        1. Understand the essential clinical features of medication dosage and rate
        problems for increasingly complex scenarios.
        2. Apply key formula used for medication dosage to practice based
        scenarios
        3. Demonstrate problem-solving skills required to accurately calculate
        medication dosages and IV infusion rates.
        4. Assess and evaluate their learning and competence development in
        drug calculations.

        Skills

        Numeracy
        Calculations
        Problem solving

        Assessment

        100% pass rate
        Students must pass this module to progress from Year 2 to Year 3

        Coursework

        0%

        Written

        100%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        0

        Module Code

        NLD2127

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        5 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

    • Year 3
      • Developing Leadership and Professionalism
        Overview

        Students will demonstrate positive knowledge, skills, attitudes and values in leading and managing care in a diverse health and social care system. This will be achieved through the following themes:

        Leadership and management: review of theories and identification of own leadership style; delegation and accountability; prioritisation of patient care; legal principles; managing teams; resolving conflict in teams

        Principles of supervision and assessment in practice: roles of supervisors and assessors for pre-registration students in practice; supporting learning in practice; giving constructive feedback; courageous conversations

        Professional values: e-professionalism, transition from student to registered nurse, professional and legal accountability; understanding of health care law, application of ethical theories and principles to professional issues including the Code.

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Debate different leadership styles that impact on the care outcomes of
        individuals and communities and explore own leadership and
        management skills
        2. Examine and apply principles of supervision and assessment in practice
        3. Evaluate the application of legal, ethical, and professional principles to
        leadership and management in nursing.
        4. Promote equality and diversity in health and social care practice.
        5. Demonstrate professional knowledge, skills, attitudes and values
        commensurate with nurses entering and remaining on the register

        Skills

        Annexe A
        1.1 actively listen, recognise and respond to verbal and non-verbal cues
        1.2 use prompts and positive verbal and non-verbal reinforcement
        1.3 use appropriate non-verbal communication including touch, eye
        contact and personal space
        1.4 make appropriate use of open and closed questioning
        1.6 check understanding and use clarification techniques
        1.7 be aware of own unconscious bias in communication encounters
        4. Evidence-based, best practice communication skills and approaches
        for working with people in professional teams
        4.1 Demonstrate effective supervision, teaching and performance
        appraisal through the use of:
        4.1.1 clear instructions and explanations when supervising, teaching or
        appraising others
        4.1.2 clear instructions and check understanding when delegating care
        responsibilities to others
        4.1.3 unambiguous, constructive feedback about strengths and
        weaknesses and potential for improvement
        4.1.4 encouragement to colleagues that helps them to reflect on their
        practice
        4.1.5 unambiguous records of performance
        4.2 Demonstrate effective person and team management through the
        use of:
        4.2.1 strengths based approaches to developing teams and managing
        change
        4.2.2 active listening when dealing with team members’ concerns and
        anxieties
        4.2.3 a calm presence when dealing with conflict
        4.2.4 appropriate and effective confrontation strategies
        4.2.5 de-escalation strategies and techniques when dealing with conflict
        4.2.6 effective co-ordination and navigation skills through:
        4.2.6.1 appropriate negotiation strategies
        4.2.6.2 appropriate escalation procedures
        4.2.6.3 appropriate approaches to advocacy

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in all online activities.

        Achievement of at least 40% in each assessed element in order to pass the module. There is no compensation between elements.

        Coursework

        70%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        30%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        NFY3131

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        8 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Evidence Based Nursing for Quality Improvement
        Overview

        Students will be supported to develop the knowledge and skills to be involved in quality improvement processes in practice. This course will be informed by the principles of the NI Quality 2020 strategy enabling students to achieve competence at Level 1 of the Q2020 attributes framework in delivering improvement. This will include an overview of QI in NI; a review of QI processes, literature reviewing for QI, how to implement the PDSA cycle (e.g team working, principles and methods of data collection and consent); analysing QI data, writing up quality reports for practice, identification of barriers and facilitators when implementing future change.

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Analyse and evaluate evidence for application in practice-led quality initiatives
        2. Critically discuss the role of clinical governance processes in quality
        improvement
        3. Review and apply quality improvement theory to practice-led quality
        initiatives
        4. Critically examine the barriers and facilitators of implementing quality
        improvement in health care settings

        Skills

        To demonstrate Level 1 skills in Q2020 attributes framework for quality
        improvement:

        • understand how culture in the workplace influences the quality and safety
        of care and services
        • recognise personal responsibility to question the way we work in order to
        improve care and services
        • work as part of a team to achieve small-step-change
        • explain and use PDSA cycles to make small-step-change to care and
        services
        • identify where teamwork could be more effective and work with others to
        improve team performance
        • involve patients/service users and their carers/families in planning care
        and in quality improvement activities

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in all online activities.

        Achievement of at least 40% in order to pass the module.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        NFY3132

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        8 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Applied Pharmacology for Nursing Practice
        Overview

        Students from all fields of practice will recognise the various procedural routes under which medicines can be prescribed and understand the policies and regulations and guidance that underpin them. They will be able to demonstrate critical decision making of legal and ethical issues for administration and prescribing medicines across the lifespan. They will demonstrate the importance of accurate checks, transcription and titration, the direction to supply or administer a medicinal product and drug calculations. They will also critically examine shared decision making and patient partnership including the communication process with their professional colleagues. They will be able to evaluate legal and ethical issues for administration and prescribing medicines across the lifespan and be able to critically examine issues associated with multiple co-morbid conditions, complex drugs, polypharmacy and stewardship.

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Communicate and collaborate effectively with individuals, their carers’ and professional colleagues about medication review
        2. Critically examine ethical and legal issues in relation to the prescribing and administration of medicines
        3. Critically examine issues associated with multiple co-morbid conditions,
        complex drugs and polypharmacy

        Skills

        1. Recognise the various procedural routes under which medicines can be
        prescribed, supplied, dispensed and administered and the laws, policies
        and regulations and guidance that underpin them (Annex B 11.2)
        2. Undertake accurate drug calculations for a range of medications for a
        range of medications (Annex B 11.4)
        3. Undertake accurate checks, including transcription and titration, of any
        direction to supply or administer a medicinal product (Annex B 11.5)
        4. Exercise professional accountability in ensuring the safe administration
        of medicines to those receiving care (Annex B 11.6)
        5. Administer medications using a range of routes (Annex B 11.8)
        6. Administer and monitor medications using vascular access devices and
        enteral equipment (Annex B 11.9)
        7. Undertake safe storage, transportation and disposal of medicinal
        products (Annex B 11.11).

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in all online activities.

        Achievement of at least 40% in each assessed element in order to pass the module. There is no compensation between elements.

        Coursework

        0%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        100%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        10

        Module Code

        NFY3133

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        5 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Managing Complexity/Sustaining Health & Wellbeing of Adults&Older Adults with Learning Disabilities
        Overview

        Students will develop knowledge and skills on the management of complex health and care needs of adults and older adults with learning disabilities and complex health needs. These will include:
        Philosophy of ageing: ageing, healthy ageing and age related conditions such as dementia, cancers and the process of ageing – impact on individual; role of family carers across the lifespan.

        Legislation and policy: coproduction, capacity/decision making and consent; safeguarding – DNAR, Escalation Models of care, service provision including non-pharmacological approaches to care delivery

        Managing complex health and long term needs such as Down syndrome, Dementia, co-morbidities, diabetes, epilepsy with the promotion of physical, psychological and social well-being, multiagency working

        Palliative and end of life care: philosophies, pain assessment/management, resource management, care planning, communication (engaging in courageous conversations and breaking bad news), self-care and resilience, bereavement

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Critically review and appraise research-based and other evidence
        sources in relation to co-morbidities and health needs of adults and older
        people with learning disabilities including palliative and end of life care.
        2. Work in partnership with the adult /older adult with complex health needs
        and learning disabilities and their family/carers to develop person
        centred care plans
        3. Critically examine strategies to promote self-management of complex
        needs with adults/older adults and their families/carers.
        4. Critically reflect on coproduction involving users and carers in
        collaborative working with the multidisciplinary team
        5. Critically evaluate outcomes of nursing interventions aimed at managing
        complex health conditions and sustaining wellbeing of adults and older
        people with learning disabilities.

        Skills

        By the end of this module the student will have practised skills of:

        1. Assessing and optimising skin and hygiene status determining the
        need for support and intervention (Annex B: 4.1)
        2. Assessing nutritional needs of patients using recognised risk
        assessment tool (Annex B: 5.1, 5.2,)
        3. Assist with feeding and drinking with appropriate aids 5.3
        4. Accurately recording fluid intake and output and identify, respond to
        and manage dehydration (Annex B: 5.4)
        5. Insert, manage, and remove oro/naso/gastric tubes 5.6
        6. Venepuncture, cannulation, blood sampling, interpreting normal and
        common abnormal blood profiles and venous blood gases (Annex B:
        2.2)
        7. Recording ECG’s and interpreting normal and common abnormal heart
        traces (Annex B: 2.3)
        8. Manage and interpret cardiac monitors, infusion pumps, and other
        monitoring devices (2.5)
        9. Undertake chest auscultation and interpret findings (2.8)
        10. Accurate interpretation of blood results (Annex B part one section 2)
        11. Recognising and managing anaphylaxis (Annex B: 2.16)
        12. Selecting and using appropriate continence products. Insert, manage
        and remove catheters and assist with self-catheterisation when
        required (Annex B: 6.2)
        13. Undertaking stoma care identifying and using appropriate products and
        approaches (Annex B: 6.6)
        14. Assessing and managing altered bowel patterns: constipation,
        diarrhoea, urinary and faecal retention (Annex B: 6.4)
        15. Administering enemas and suppositories and undertake rectal
        examination and manual evacuation when appropriate (Annex B: 6.5)
        16. Accurately assessing the person’s capacity for independence and self-
        care (Annex B: 7)
        17. Using appropriate moving and handling equipment to support people
        with impaired mobility (Annex B: 7.3)
        18. Responding appropriately to uncontrolled symptoms of pain, nausea,
        thirst, constipation, restlessness, agitation, anxiety and depression
        (Annex B: 10.1)
        19. Managing and monitoring effectiveness of symptom relief medication,
        infusion pumps and other devices (Annex B: 10.2)
        20. Assessing and reviewing preferences and care priorities of the dying
        person and their family and carers (Annex B: 10.3)
        21. Applying organ and tissue donation protocols as appropriate; advanced
        planning decisions (Annex B: 10.4)
        22. Appropriate application of DNACPR decisions and understand
        verification of expected death (Annex B: 10.5)
        23. Providing appropriate care for the deceased person and the bereaved
        respecting cultural requirements and protocols (Annex B: 10.6)
        24. Carrying out initial and continued assessments of people receiving care
        and their ability to self-administer their own medications (Annex B:
        11.1)
        25. Administering injections using IM, S/c, intradermal and Intravenous
        routes (Annex B: 11. 7)
        26. Engaging in difficult conversations, including breaking bad news and
        support people who are feeling emotionally or physically vulnerable or
        in distress, conveying compassion and sensitivity (Annex A: 2.9)
        27. Recognising and assessing a person’s cognitive health status and
        wellbeing (Annex B: 1.1.2)
        28. Managing signs of mental and emotional distress (Annex B: 1.1.5)
        29. Delivering person-centred care
        30. Delivering psychological and emotional care of families, relatives and
        carers
        31. Demonstrates application of the nursing process (Annex B: 1.2.1)
        32. Demonstrates an ability to see the person as the expert in his or her
        experience (Annex B: 1.2.1)
        33. Demonstrates an ability to see the person and not just his or her
        symptoms (Annex B: 1.2.1)
        34. Demonstrates respect for the contribution of families, friends and
        carers (Annex B: 1.2.1)
        35. Recognises when additional actions are needed to address additional
        care needs (Annex B: 1.2.1)

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in all online activities. Attendance at all practice placements.

        Achievement of at least 40% in each assessed element in order to pass the module. There is no compensation between elements.

        Students must pass both clinical and academic assessments to pass module.

        Coursework

        0%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        100%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        40

        Module Code

        NLD3135

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        36 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Co-Ordination of Care to Improve Quality of Life for the Person with Learning Disabilities
        Overview

        Students will develop knowledge and skills to the improve health and quality of life, through the delivery of evidence-based nursing assessment, interventions, support and education, for people with learning disabilities with complex needs and their families and carers and other professionals. This will include the following themes:

        Legal frameworks and legislation; ethics; supported decision making, capacity and consent; safeguarding and professional accountability

        Autonomy, meaningful lives and citizenship;sexuality, relationships and parenting; facilitating access to services; future planning

        Care management and co-ordination of care; assessment of care needs; health screening; health improvement, health promotion and health education designing services, multiagency working; ervice transitions across the life span.

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Identify and critically review the evidence of personal, social,
        environmental and physical factors that promotes integrated practice
        across education, health and social care services for people with
        learning disabilities.
        2. Examine the ethical, policy, professional and legal frameworks and their
        application to meeting the health and social care needs of people with a
        learning disability across the life span with complex health needs when
        supporting the person to access services
        3. Critically examine partnership working with individuals, carers and other
        professionals enabling an active role in in co-producing their care plans
        and in co-designing their services.
        4. Critically identify the impact of learning disability nursing interventions
        and reasonable adjustments to care to improve quality of life for people
        with a learning disability across the lifespan with complex health needs.
        5. Critically reflect on family and carer support needs and the role of the
        learning disability nurse in quality of life for people with learning
        disabilities across the lifespan with complex health and social care
        needs.

        Skills

        1. Addressing when an onward referral is needed (Annex B: 4.5)
        2. Recognising and responding to signs of all forms of abuse (Annex B:
        2.11)
        3. Providing support for families identifying need for intervention

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in all online activities.

        Achievement of at least 40% in each assessed element in order to pass the module. There is no compensation between elements.

        Coursework

        0%

        Written

        30%

        Practical

        70%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        NLD3136

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        18 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Inter-Professional Working
        Overview

        Students will collaboratively work and communicate with other members of the healthcare delivery team using interprofessional learning-based activities. Students will: explore roles and boundaries in interprofessional working including medication review; consider decision making frameworks relevant to working in interprofessional teams. They will develop strategies for effective communication and patient safety initiatives.

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Demonstrate effective communication within an interdisciplinary
        environment
        2. Demonstrate the skills to confidently escalate concerns and resolve
        conflict within teams
        3. Critically examine the decision making process when working with
        multiple professionals

        Skills

        4.1 Demonstrate effective supervision, teaching and performance
        appraisal through the use of:
        4.1.1 clear instructions and explanations when supervising, teaching or
        appraising others
        4.1.2 clear instructions and check understanding when delegating care
        responsibilities to others
        4.1.3 unambiguous, constructive feedback about strengths and
        weaknesses and potential for improvement
        4.1.4 encouragement to colleagues that helps them to reflect on their
        practice
        4.1.5 unambiguous records of performance
        4.2 Demonstrate effective person and team management through the
        use of:
        4.2.1 strengths based approaches to developing teams and managing
        change
        4.2.2 active listening when dealing with team members’ concerns and
        anxieties
        4.2.3 a calm presence when dealing with conflict
        4.2.4 appropriate and effective confrontation strategies
        4.2.5 de-escalation strategies and techniques when dealing with conflict
        4.2.6 effective co-ordination and navigation skills through:
        4.2.6.1 appropriate negotiation strategies
        4.2.6.2 appropriate escalation procedures
        4.2.6.3 appropriate approaches to advocacy

        Assessment

        Attendance at all timetabled classes and participation and engagement in allocated interprofessional learning activity. Achievement of at least 40% in the assessment in order to pass the module. There is no compensation between elements.

        Student must submit video-based reflective commentary within five working days of attendance at IPL activity.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        10

        Module Code

        NFY3134

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        36 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Safe Medicate 3 - Learning Disabilities
        Overview

        Having developed insight into key formula, students will engage and apply previous knowledge in more complex field specific scenarios preparing students for safe clinical practice as they prepare for entry to the register. Using the Safemedicate is a NMC approved online platform students complete interactive exercises and practice assessments similar to solving dosage calculation problems in the real world. Students have their individual online account which provides a record of their achievement across the Programme. This information is accessible only to students and the university.

        This software has a formative built in assessment that students have to complete to progress to the summative assessment.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of SafeMedicate 3 students will be able to:
        1. Undertake complex medication dosage and rate problems.
        2. Demonstrate problem-solving skills required to accurately calculate
        medication dosages and IV infusion rates for complex field specific
        scenarios
        3. Assess and evaluate their learning and competence development in
        drug calculations as part of ongoing development for entry to the
        register.

        Skills

        Numeracy
        Calculations
        Problem solving

        Assessment

        100% pass rate
        Students are required to pass this module to successfully complete the programme and satisfy NMC requirements to enter the register

        Coursework

        0%

        Written

        100%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        0

        Module Code

        NLD3137

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        18 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

  • Entry Requirements

    Entrance requirements

    All applicants
    This information is prepared in advance of the academic year to which it relates and the grades stated should be treated as a guide only and entrance requirements are reviewed annually.

    Overall academic background will be taken into account when considering applications and additional academic criteria may have to be applied at shortlisting, depending on the volume of applications.

    All applicants (except Access/Foundation applicants) must normally have a minimum of 5 GCSEs at grade C / 4 to include English Language or an equivalent qualification acceptable to the University, Mathematics and a Science subject (ie Biology/Human Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Double Award Science or Single Award Science). GCSE/BTEC Applied Science is not acceptable in lieu of GCSE Science.

    Applicants offering Access/Foundation courses must also have a grade C / 4 in GCSE Mathematics and a Science subject (see above) or an equivalent qualification acceptable to the University. Within an Access programme, a pass in the Mathematics module(s) and a pass in one Level 3 Biology or Chemistry or Physics module would fulfil the GCSE Mathematics and Science requirements.

    In addition to the GCSE requirements, or equivalent, applicants must offer one of the following qualifications:
    A-level
    BCC including a relevant Science (Biology/Human Biology, Chemistry, Life & Health Sciences, Mathematics or Physics)
    OR
    BBC where a relevant Science subject is not offered.
    Irish Leaving Certificate
    H3H3H3H4H4 at Higher Level where a relevant Science subject is offered (Biology, Chemistry or Physics)
    OR
    H3H3H3H3H4 at Higher Level where a relevant Science subject is not offered.

    All applicants - if not offered at Higher Level then Ordinary Level grade O4 in Mathematics and a Science subject.

    All applicants must have a minimum of 5 grade Cs / Merits in the Junior Certificate to include Mathematics and Science.
    BTEC Level 3 Extended/National Extended Diploma
    Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (QCF)
    Successful completion of the BTEC Extended Diploma (180 credits at Level 3) with overall grades DDM.

    Edexcel BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma (RQF)
    Successful completion of the BTEC National Extended Diploma (1080 GLH at Level 3) with overall grades DDM.
    Access Course
    65% (Level 3 modules) with two modules of Biology or Chemistry or Physics
    OR
    70% (Level 3 modules) with one module of Biology or Chemistry or Physics
    OR
    70%(Level 3 modules) in an Access Course with no science modules

    In addition, see GCSE or equivalent requirements above (in “All applicants”).
    BTEC Higher National Diploma
    Successful completion with a minimum of 12 Merits and 4 Passes in individual units. Must satisfy the GCSE Mathematics and Science requirements as above.
    BTEC Higher National Certificate
    Successful completion with a minimum of a Merit grade in each unit. Must satisfy the GCSE Mathematics and Science requirements as above.
    Scottish Highers
    BBBCC where a relevant Science subject is offered (see list under A-level requirements)
    OR
    BBBBC where a relevant Science subject is not offered.

    All applicants must have a minimum of 5 Standards at grade 3 or a minimum of 5 Intermediates/National 5 at grade C to include English Language, Mathematics and a Science subject.
    Graduate
    Honours Degree (minimum third class); Ordinary Degree (minimum pass). Graduates must satisfy the GCSE Mathematics and Science requirements as above.
    Open University Credit
    A minimum of 120 OU Credits. Must satisfy the GCSE Mathematics and Science requirements as above.

    1. Applicants who satisfy the academic requirements or will be able to do so by 31 August 2023 will be shortlisted for interview.

    2. Interviews normally take place during March/April and shortlisted applicants will be invited to participate in a virtual interview. More detail can be found on the School’s website.

    3. Offers are made on the basis of ranked interview scores and are subject to satisfactory Occupational Health Assessment and Criminal Record check(s), in addition to any academic requirements. More detail can be found on the School's website..

    Selection Criteria

    In addition, to the entrance requirements above, it is essential that you read our guidance below on 'How we choose our students' prior to submitting your UCAS application.

    International Students

    Our country/region pages include information on entry requirements, tuition fees, scholarships, student profiles, upcoming events and contacts for your country/region. Use the dropdown list below for specific information for your country/region.

    English Language Requirements

    An IELTS score of 7.0 with a minimum of 7.0 in Listening, Speaking and Reading, and a minimum of 6.5 in Writing or an equivalent acceptable qualification, details of which are available at: http://go.qub.ac.uk/EnglishLanguageReqs

    If you need to improve your English language skills before you enter this degree programme, INTO Queen's University Belfast offers a range of English language courses. These intensive and flexible courses are designed to improve your English ability for admission to this degree.

    • Academic English: an intensive English language and study skills course for successful university study at degree level
    • Pre-sessional English: a short intensive academic English course for students starting a degree programme at Queen's University Belfast and who need to improve their English.

    International Students - Foundation and International Year One Programmes

    INTO Queen's offers a range of academic and English language programmes to help prepare international students for undergraduate study at Queen's University. You will learn from experienced teachers in a dedicated international study centre on campus, and will have full access to the University's world-class facilities.

    These programmes are designed for international students who do not meet the required academic and English language requirements for direct entry.

    INTO - English Language Course(QSIS ELEMENT IS EMPTY)

    NEXT
    Careers

  • Careers

    Career Prospects

    Introduction
    Studying for a BSc (Hons) Professional Nursing degree at Queen’s will assist you in developing the core skills and employment-related experiences that are valued by employers, professional organisations and academic institutions. Graduates from this degree at Queen’s are well regarded by employers both nationally and internationally.

    Employment after the Course
    Around 99% of graduates from this programme go on to pursue a career in nursing which is an interesting, rewarding and challenging career where work can be in a variety of health care settings, with people of all ages and backgrounds. Nursing can also offer a diverse range of post registration opportunities to specialise in areas such as counselling; public health and health promotion; acute care, as well as education and research

    Professional Opportunities
    Students who join our Learning Disabilities Nursing course will graduate from the same programme; there is no opportunity to move between fields after you commence the course. Graduates, therefore, are specialists in their field and go on to excel in the area of Learning Disabilities Nursing.

    Additional Awards Gained

    All students entering this programme are required to undergo an enhanced disclosure check with Access NI which costs £33.

    In Year 1 students must buy a uniform from a QUB approved uniform supplier (approximate cost £180), a name badge (£10) and an e-portfolio (£10) from the University.

    All students on this program will undertake clinical placements; students are responsible for funding travel, accommodation and subsistence costs. These costs vary depending on the location and duration of the placements. Some reimbursement may be available.
    International and non-commissioned students are required to pay a placement charge of £3,000.

    In Year 3 students may wish to undertake an international elective placement; students are responsible for funding travel, accommodation and subsistence costs. These costs vary depending on the location and duration of the placement.

    Students may wish to buy a Fob Watch, approximate cost £15.

    Prizes and Awards(QSIS ELEMENT IS EMPTY)

    Degree plus award for extra-curricular skills

    In addition to your degree programme, at Queen's you can have the opportunity to gain wider life, academic and employability skills. For example, placements, voluntary work, clubs, societies, sports and lots more. So not only do you graduate with a degree recognised from a world leading university, you'll have practical national and international experience plus a wider exposure to life overall. We call this Degree Plus. It's what makes studying at Queen's University Belfast special.

  • Fees and Funding

    Tuition Fees

    Northern Ireland (NI) 1 No fee
    Republic of Ireland (ROI) 2 No fee
    England, Scotland or Wales (GB) 1 £9,250
    EU Other 3 £18,800
    International £18,800

    1 EU citizens in the EU Settlement Scheme, with settled status, will be charged the NI or GB tuition fee based on where they are ordinarily resident. Students who are ROI nationals resident in GB will be charged the GB fee.

    2 EU students who are ROI nationals resident in ROI are eligible for NI tuition fees.

    3 EU Other students (excludes Republic of Ireland nationals living in GB, NI or ROI) are charged tuition fees in line with international fees.

    All tuition fees quoted relate to a single year of study unless stated otherwise. The NI and ROI fees relate to academic year 2022-23 and will be updated to 2023-24 rates once they have been confirmed. All fees will be subject to an annual inflationary increase, unless explicitly stated otherwise.

    NI, GB and ROI fees for 2022 entry will be published soon. International fees for 2022 entry can be viewed here: www.qub.ac.uk/International/International-students/International-tuition-fees

    Tuition fee rates are calculated based on a student’s tuition fee status and generally increase annually by inflation. How tuition fees are determined is set out in the Student Finance Framework.

    GB students (England, Scotland, Wales) are not entitled to a commissioned place with associated funding (tuition fees, and maintenance allowance from the NI Department of Health) and a decision as to whether or not we can admit GB students with funding from the Student Loans Company has not yet been decided. Clarification on this position is currently being sought and further information will be available in due course.

    Additional course costs

    All Students

    Depending on the programme of study, there may be extra costs which are not covered by tuition fees, which students will need to consider when planning their studies.

    Students can borrow books and access online learning resources from any Queen's library.

    If students wish to purchase recommended texts, rather than borrow them from the University Library, prices per text can range from £30 to £100. A programme may have up to 6 modules per year, each with a recommended text.  

    Students should also budget between £30 to £75 per year for photocopying, memory sticks and printing charges.  

    Students undertaking a period of work placement or study abroad, as either a compulsory or optional part of their programme, should be aware that they will have to fund additional travel and living costs.

    If a final year includes a major project or dissertation, there may be costs associated with transport, accommodation and/or materials. The amount will depend on the project chosen. There may also be additional costs for printing and binding.

    Students may wish to consider purchasing an electronic device; costs will vary depending on the specification of the model chosen.

    There are also additional charges for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines.

    Professional Nursing Learning Disabilities Nursing costs

    All students entering this programme are required to undergo an enhanced disclosure check with Access NI which costs £33.

    In Year 1 students must buy a uniform from a QUB-selected uniform supplier (approximate cost £180), and a name badge (£10).

    All students on this programme will undertake clinical placements, which can be anywhere in Northern Ireland. Students are responsible for funding travel, accommodation and subsistence costs. These costs vary depending on the location and duration of the placements. Some reimbursement may be available for funded students.

    Students may wish to buy a Fob Watch or Pinard Horn, approximate cost £15.

    Non-funded students pay a placement charge which is for facilitating the clinical placement. It is collected by the Student Finance Office and is passed on to our placement provider partners. The cost for 2022-23 is currently £4,500 per year.

    Please note that students on an NHS funded place cannot apply for loan funding from Student Finance NI.

    To be eligible for a commissioned (funded) place, students must normally be resident in NI or RoI for at least 3 years before the start of the programme. More information is available in the Bursaries Booklet, available here: https://hscbusiness.hscni.net/services/2662.htm

    Link to website with information: https://www.qub.ac.uk/Study/Feesandfinance/doh-funded-courses/

    How do I fund my study?

    There are different tuition fee and student financial support arrangements for students from Northern Ireland, those from England, Scotland and Wales (Great Britain), and those from the rest of the European Union.

    Information on funding options and financial assistance for undergraduate students is available at www.qub.ac.uk/Study/Undergraduate/Fees-and-scholarships/.

    Scholarships

    Each year, we offer a range of scholarships and prizes for new students. Information on scholarships available.

    International Scholarships

    Information on scholarships for international students, is available at www.qub.ac.uk/International/International-students/International-scholarships/.

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    Careers

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    Apply

  • Apply

    How and when to Apply

    1. How to Apply
    Application for admission to full-time undergraduate and sandwich courses at the University should normally be made through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS). Full information can be obtained from the UCAS website at:
    www.ucas.com/apply

    2. When to Apply
    UCAS will start processing applications for entry in autumn 2023 from 1 September 2022.

    Advisory closing date: 25 January 2023 (18:00).

    Applications received after this date will not be considered.

    Applicants are encouraged to apply as early as is consistent with having made a careful and considered choice of institutions and courses.

    The Institution code for Queen’s is QBELF and the institution code is Q75.

    Further information on applying to study at Queen's is available at:
    www.qub.ac.uk/Study/Undergraduate/How-to-apply/

    3. Terms and Conditions
    After an offer is made this will be notified to applicants through UCAS. Confirmation will be emailed by the Admissions and Access Service and this communication will also include Terms and Conditions which applicants should read carefully in advance of replying to their offer(s) on UCAS Track.
    www.qub.ac.uk/Study/TermsandConditions

    4. International (Non- EU) Students
    ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR INTERNATIONAL (NON-EU) STUDENTS
    Applying through agents and partners
    The University’s in-country representatives can assist you to submit a UCAS application. Please consult the Agent List to find an agent in your country who will help you with your application to Queen’s University.

    4.1 Applying through UCAS
    Most students make their applications through UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service) for full-time undergraduate degree programmes at Queen's.
    www.ucas.com/

    4.2 Applying direct
    The Direct Entry Application form is to be used by international applicants who wish to apply directly, and only, to Queen's or who have been asked to provide information in advance of submitting a formal UCAS application.
    www.qub.ac.uk/International/International-students/Applying/

    4.3 Applying through agents and partners
    The University’s in-country representatives can assist you to submit a UCAS application or a direct application. Please consult the Agent List to find an agent in your country who will help you with your application to Queen’s University.

    Download a prospectus

    Keywords

    INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY NURSING

    LEARNING DISABILITY NURSING

    NMC

    NURSING

    PRE-REGISTRATION NURSING

Register your interest
Course Vacancy Status

Below is the current vacancy status for this course. For further information please contact us.

Student Type
Places available?
NI and RoI Students
GB Students
International and EU (not RoI) Students