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Anthropology and International Relations (BA)

BA|Undergraduate

Anthropology and International Relations

Entry year
Academic Year 2023/24
Entry requirements
ABB
Duration
3 years (Full Time)
6 years (Part Time)
UCAS code
LL6F
  • Overview

    The Joint Honours Programme in Anthropology and International Relations provides students with an in-depth, interdisciplinary understanding of contemporary cultures and politics, international affairs, societies, and conflict situations in their political, historical, social, cultural, economic and legal dimensions.

    International Relations at Queen’s is about more than just armed conflict and insurgency. It also examines such trends as globalisation and considers the challenge from the rise of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, the process of European integration, humanitarian issues (such as poverty, development and refugees), and the role of the media in conflict.

    Anthropology is the study of human diversity around the world. In studying anthropology, you will learn how different societies live together and think about such topics as family, sex, religion, art, and economics and gain skills increasingly in demand in a globalized and automated world.

    Studying anthropology at Queen’s will allow you to examine some of the deepest and most pressing questions about human beings. Issues addressed in our modules include:

    Does globalisation mean the end of cultural difference?
    Can a post-conflict society heal?
    How do ritual traditions, musical performances, and art shape cultural identities?
    How do some people become willing to die for a group?

    Through classroom modules, optional placements, and your own anthropological fieldwork, you will also gain valuable skills in critical thinking, cross-cultural understanding, researching, interviewing, writing, and presenting.

    Anthropology and International Relations Degree highlights

    In the Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2021, Anthropology was ranked: 2nd in the UK for Teaching Quality 5th in the UK for Student Experience 3rd in the UK for Research 3rd in the UK for Graduate Prospects

    Global Opportunities

    • Undergraduate anthropology students, as part of their training, have carried out ethnographic field research around the world. Projects have focused on orphanages in Kenya; AIDS in southern Africa, education in Ghana; dance in India, NGOs in Guatemala, music in China, marriage in Japan, backpacking in Europe, and whale-watching in Hawaii.

      In addition, through the different stages of the dissertation module (preparation and research design, fieldwork itself, and post-fieldwork writing-up), students develop a range of skills (organizational skills, interpersonal skills, information-handling skills, and project management skills) that prepare them for later employment. Many of our students work with NGOs and other organisations as part of their fieldwork.

      QUB students, uniquely in the UK, still have the opportunity to spend part of the course studying in other European universities, through our Erasmus programme. There are also opportunities to study at partner institutions in the USA and Canada.

    Career Development

    • Anthropology combines an understanding of cultural diversity through human behaviour and expression, with a hands-on method of study that focuses on lived experience.
      Queen's offers the only anthropology course in the UK that combines the study of expressivity (through art and music) with thematic strands on conflict, religion, cognition, and business anthropology.

    World Class Facilities

    • The Performance Room includes a variety of musical instruments from around the world, a collection that has grown since the 1970s when Ethnomusicology was first established as an International Centre at Queen’s by the late Prof John Blacking. These instruments, together with the sprung performance room floor, facilitate music and dance ensembles, enabling our unit to remain one of the leading departments in Ethnomusicology.

      Anthropology at Queen's also maintains close connections with the following research institutes: Senator George J. Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security and Justice; Institute of Cognition and Culture; Institute of Irish Studies.

    Internationally Renowned Experts

    • Anthropology at Queen’s has international renown in the following areas: Ethnomusicology and performance; Conflict and borders; Religion; Cognition and culture; Migration and diasporas; Irish studies; Material culture and art; Human-animal relations; The cross-cultural study of emotions.

      It also maintains close connections with the following research institutes: Senator George J. Mitchell Institute for Global Peace; Security and Justice; Institute of Cognition and Culture; Institute of Irish Studies.
    • The School of History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics at Queen‘s has 30 full-time academics, making it the largest institutional centre for the study of these subjects in Ireland and one of the largest in the UK.

      The School also boasts the following:
      • Centre for Public History
      • The Senator George J Mitchell Institute for
      Global Peace, Security and Justice
      • Institute of Cognition and Culture
      • Institute of Irish Studies
      • Two International Summer Schools (the Irish
      Studies Summer School; and the Conflict
      Transformation and Social Justice Summer
      School)
    • Professor David Phinnemore is an expert on EU Treaty reform and EU enlargement, which led to his secondment as an advisor to the UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office.
    • Professor John Garry is an internationally recognised expert in the areas of citizens’ political attitudes and voting behaviour. His research has informed governments both in Belfast and Dublin on offering ordinary citizens the chance to have greater input on policymaking.
    • In the Guardian University Guide 2021, Anthropology was ranked 2nd in the UK overall.

    Student Experience

    • Queen's currently has over 3,000 international students from 85 different countries.
    • Our vibrant Politics Society (Polysoc) provides a welcome and stimulating environment for new students.
    "The fieldwork and dissertation have been central to my experience as a Anthropology student. While I am sure it will stand me in good stead in my future search for employment, its central value was as a practice which revealed what Anthropology is really about; through fieldwork, the abstract and theoretical concepts which we had absorbed in two years previous study became immediate and concrete; the subject came alive. Observing and analysing patterns of human action and thought, and later attempting to relay any inferred information (in the form of a dissertation) was a stimulating and challenging process, which seemed to me to be of value in and of itself."
    Samuel Ward
  • Course content

    Course Structure

    IntroductionIntroduction
    Anthropology at Queen’s is constructed around four innovative, engaged themes:

    What Makes Us Human?
    Key modules explore core elements of anthropology. They examine social groups, from families to nations, and social dynamics, from village politics to globalisation. In understanding social groups we examine individual life trajectories against the background of diverse social expectations.

    Modules may include: Being Human: Evolution, Culture and Society; World on the Move; How Society Works.

    Conflict, Peacebuilding and Identity
    Modules on this theme deal directly with large-scale Global Challenges such as conflict, security, and peacebuilding. Issues such as migration, ethnic conflict, and globalisation will be covered across all three years of the degree, with specialist modules looking at Ireland and at the role of anthropology in policy.

    Modules may include: Us & Them: Why We Have Ingroups and Outgroups; Why Are Humans Violent? Understanding Violence, Conflict, and Trauma; Migration, Mobilities and Borders.

    Arts, Creativity and Music
    Globally renowned for long-standing research expertise in the area of ethnomusicology and the arts, our modules examine issues of sound and music making; art, aesthetics and emotion; and performance and identity around the world. We explore the production, appropriation and use of material artefacts and images in a world of interconnectedness through migration, trade, and digital communication technology.

    Modules may include: Being Creative: Music, Media and the Arts; Radical Musics: Understanding Sounds of Defiance across Disciplines.

    Morality, Religion and Cognition
    These modules examine a number of important themes in religion and morality, including the origins of religion, apocalyptic movements, sacred values, and the relationship of emotion and religion. We will explore our moral worlds and beliefs through the socio-cultural, psychological, and evolutionary sciences.

    Modules may include: Apocalypse!: The End of the World; In Gods We Trust: The New Science of Religion; Human Morality; Love, Hate, and Beyond.

    International Relations
    International Relations at Queen’s is about more than just armed conflict and insurgency. It also examines such trends as globalisation and considers the challenge from the rise of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, the process of European integration, humanitarian issues (such as poverty, development and refugees), and the role of the media in conflict.

    The programme in International Relations will provide you with an in-depth understanding of contemporary politics, international affairs, and conflict situations in their political, historical, cultural, economic and legal dimensions.
    Stage 1In your first year, you will take 3 modules in Anthropology and 3 modules in International Relations.

    Anthropology
    • Being Human: Evolution, Culture and Society
    • A World on the Move: Anthropological and Historical Approaches to Globalisation Us and Them: Why Do We Have In-groups and Outgroups?
    • Being Creative: Music, Media and the Arts, Understanding Northern Ireland

    International Relations
    Students are introduced to the study of politics, political ideology, comparative politics, the state of world politics, international history and contemporary Europe.
    • Comparative Politics
    • World Politics
    • Contemporary Europe
    Stage 2Anthropology
    • How Society Works: Key Debates in Anthropology
    • Skills in the Field: Dissertation Preparation Hanging out on Street Corners: Public and Applied Anthropology
    • Business Anthropology in the Digital Age
    • Why Are Humans Violent? Understanding Violence, Conflict, and Trauma Human Morality
    • Radical Musics: Understanding Sounds of Defiance across Disciplines
    • Apocalypse! The End of the World.

    International Relations
    In your second year, you will focus on the political, economic and social transformations of the 20th century and beyond, and will be able to advance their conceptual understanding of the field of international relations and conflict by studying modules such as:
    • International Relations (compulsory)
    • American Politics
    • Deeply Divided Societies
    • Northern Ireland Conflict and Paths to Peace
    • International Organisations
    • British Politics
    • Irish Politics
    • Politics and Policies of the EU
    • Security and Terrorism
    • Peace and Conflict Studies
    • Modern Political Thought
    • Studying Politics (research methods)
    Stage 3Anthropology
    • Dissertation in Social Anthropology: Writing-Up
    • The Politics of Performance: From Negotiation to Display
    • Human-Animal Relations
    • In Gods We Trust: The New Science of Religion
    • Love, Hate and Beyond: Emotions, Culture, Practice
    • Music and Identity in the Mediterranean
    • Ireland and Britain: People, Identity, Nations
    • Remembering the Future: Violent Pasts, Loss, and the Politics of Hope

    International Relations
    • Arms Control
    • Asylum and Migration in Global Politics
    • Contemporary Political Philosophy
    • Global Political Economy of Energy
    • Politics of the Global Economy
    • European Cultural Identities
    • National and Ethnic Minorities in European Politics
    • Northern Ireland: A Case Study
    • Political Parties and Elections in Northern Ireland
    • Challenges to Contemporary Party Politics
    • Politics, Public Administration and Policymaking
    • Security and Technology
    • The Far Right in Western Europe and North America
    • The Politics of Irish Literature
    • Earth, Energy, Ethics and Economy
    • Radical Hope: Inspiring Present-day Sustainability Transformations
    • Internship
    • Placement


    Note that this is not an exclusive list and these options are subject to staff availability.

    Note that this is not an exclusive list and these options are subject to staff availability.

    People teaching you

    Dr. Cillian McBride

    Politics Programme Convenor


    Email: c.mcbride@qub.ac.uk Telephone: +44(0)2890975028

    Dr. Ioannis Tsioulakis

    Anthropology Programme Convenor


    Email: i.tsioulakis@qub.ac.uk Telephone: +44(0)2890975028

    Contact Teaching Times

    Personal Study30 (hours maximum)
    Typically 30 hours per module (30 hours per week), revising in your own time
    Medium Group Teaching9 (hours maximum)
    In a typical week, you may have up to 9 hours of practical classes, workshops or seminars, depending on the level of study.
    Large Group Teaching6 (hours maximum)
    In a typical week you may have up to 6 hours of lectures, depending on the level of study.
    Small Group Teaching/Personal Tutorial6 (hours maximum)
    In a typical week, you will have 3-6 hours of tutorials (or later, project supervision).

    Learning and Teaching

    Examples of the opportunities provided for learning on this course are:

    • E-Learning technologies
      Information associated with lectures and assignments is normally communicated via a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) called Canvas. This means that each course has its own mini-website containing all of ethe relevant course information, essential readings, recordings, discussion boards, etc. E-learning experiences are also embedded in the degree programme through the use of, for example, interactive support materials, podcasts and web-based learning activities.
    • Fieldwork
      Single-honours anthropology students have the opportunity to study research methods and carry out anthropological fieldwork for an 8-week period. This crucial period of skill-formation and research forms the basis of a dissertation they write up in the first semester of their third year.
    • Lectures
      Lectures introduce foundation information about new topics as a starting point for further self-directed private study/reading. Lectures, which are normally delivered in large groups to all year-group peers, also provide opportunities to ask questions and seek clarification on key issues as well as gain feedback and advice on assessments.
    • Self-directed study
      This is an essential part of life as a Queen’s student. It is during self-directed study when a student completes important private reading, engages with e-learning resources, reflects on feedback, and completes assignment research and preparation.
    • Seminars/tutorials
      A significant amount of teaching is carried out in small groups (typically 10-12 students). These sessions are designed to explore in more depth the information that has been presented in the lectures. They provide students with the opportunity to engage closely with academic staff, to ask questions of them and to assess their own progress and understanding with the support of their peers. During these classes, students will be expected to present their work to academic staff and their peers.

    Assessment

    A variety of assessment methods are used throughout the programme. These include:

    • • coursework essays (submitted during or at the end of the semester)
      • oral presentations by individual students
      • video logs
      • artwork and performance workshops
      • weekly online commentaries on set readings
      • written examinations
      • dissertations.

    Feedback

    As students progress through their course at Queen’s, they will receive general and specific feedback about their work from a variety of sources including lecturers, module co-ordinators, placement supervisors, personal tutors, advisers of study and peers. University students are expected to engage with reflective practice and to use this approach to improve the quality of their work.

    • Feedback may be provided in a variety of forms including:
    • Face to face comment. This may include occasions when you make use of the lecturers’ advertised “office hours” to help you to address a specific query.
    • Placement employer comments or references.
    • Online or emailed comment.
    • General comments or question and answer opportunities at the end of a lecture, seminar or tutorial.
    • Pre-submission advice regarding the standards you should aim for and common pitfalls to avoid. In some instances, this may be provided in the form of model answers or exemplars which you can review in your own time.
    • Comment and guidance provided by staff from specialist support services such as, Careers, Employability and Skills or the Learning Development Service.
    • Once you have reviewed your feedback, you will be encouraged to identify and implement further improvements to the quality of your work.

    PREV
    Overview

  • Modules

    Modules

    The information below is intended as an example only, featuring module details for the current year of study. Modules are reviewed on an annual basis and may be subject to future changes – revised details will be published through Programme Specifications ahead of each academic year.

    • Year 1
      • 'Understanding Northern Ireland: History, Politics and Anthropology'
        Overview

        This level 1 module will use a variety of historical, political, sociological and anthropological perspectives to look at key issues relating to Northern Ireland. The course will provide an overview of the history and politics of the state of Northern Ireland. It will use anthropological understandings of ethnicity and nationalism to examine how Unionism and Irish Nationalism developed. It will look in detail at the various political solutions which have been applied to ‘the Province’, with a particular focus on the Peace Process. It will examine the realities and legacies of the conflict since the signing of the 1998 Agreement. It will explore the development of cultural and political 'traditions' examining, in particular, change and continuity in Irish society.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of this module, students should
        •be aware of how to utilise a range of disciplinary approaches (historical, political, sociological and anthropological) in helping to develope an understanding of division and conflict within Northern Ireland.
        •be aware of how to examine how contemporary political communities use the past to construct traditions, ideologies and identities.
        •understand how to explore the role of history in understandings of Northern Ireland.
        •To develop a broad understanding of the politics of the state.
        •understand and look at key contemporary issues in Northern Irish society.
        •be able to assess and highlight various research approaches to Northern Ireland, and to explore how academic work can be applied.

        Skills

        Students will acquire skills in understanding written material, skills in weighing evidence and skills in debating controversial topics. The ability to read material, weigh judgements and engage with the topics being discussed. They should also develop oral presentation skills, essay writing skills and skills in accessing and analysing information, research evaluation. They will also gain experience of coping with controversial topics.

        Assessment

        Essay 1 (30%), Essay 2 (60%), Continual Assessment (10%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        ANT1006

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Perspectives on Politics
        Overview

        This module aims to introduce students to the broad field of political theory and philosophy, a necessary and integral component of the study of politics generally. Taking a contemporary approach to the subject, the module stresses the vital importance of theoretical enquiry for understanding, analysing, and criticizing everyday socio-political life. Students are therefore introduced to key concepts and problems in the study of politics, including the meaning of democracy, the fraught relation between the individual and society, and the contested nature of power and political authority. In exploring these themes, students come to an appreciation of the complexities surrounding our everyday notions of democratic rule, freedom, justice, citizenship, government, and power.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students should acquire an understanding of a number of ways of conceptualising and analysing critically key aspects of political life. On successful completion of the module they will have demonstrated capacities for reading texts in contemporary political theory and exploring the implication of these writings for practical politics.

        Skills

        Analytical and conceptual skills. The ability to argue cogently in oral and written communication.

        Assessment

        10% tutorial participation, 35% essay, 55% essay.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI1007

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Comparative Politics
        Overview

        The purpose of this course is to explore key themes in British and Irish Politcs in a comparative perspective. The aim is to enable students to understand current politics by comparing Britain, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland to each other and also to other developed democracies. The course opens with two lectures that lay out the ideas behind comparison as a tool of understanding. Subsequent topics include: party systems, electoral systems, government formation, inter-party competition, intra-party competition and devolution.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students should be able to identify what the fundamental differences are between Britain and Ireland in terms of how political life is organised and how citizens think and act politically. Students should also become familiar with the fundamental elements that are shared by the two islands. Students should gain an understanding of what it is about the politics of Britain and Ireland that is unique in a comparative European context. They should also gain insight into the elements of political life on these islands that is common across our European neighbours.

        Skills

        Students will be taught how to identify fundamental political factors and processes rather than the surface details of everyday political life. They will be taught to compare rather than simply describe. In class they will be taught how to discuss the politics of a country - whether that be Northern Ireland, Britain or the Republic of Ireland - in a comparative context and so speak of fundamental differences and similarities rather than a lot of country specific nuance and detail. In their assignments they will be taught how to write and argue about Britain and Ireland using comparison rather than description as their major analytic tool.

        Assessment

        Essay (55%), Presentation (10%), Portfolio (35%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI1009

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Being Creative: Music Media and the Arts
        Overview

        Anthropologists have analysed how people with different cultures' express themselves in a variety of ways through sound, text and image. Who is involved in specific expressive practices, who controls these practices, and which media are emphasised by different groups? Can textual, verbal, musical and material forms of expression be communicated across cultural boundaries? How do processes of cultural translation affect their meaning and impact on different lifeworlds? In this module, we will explore performative genres including musical activities and rituals; language-based forms of expression and processes of visual and material expression around artworks, objects and film documentation.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students should have acquired a basic understanding of key issues relating to the performative dimensions of cultural expression through a comparative analysis of ethnographic studies pertaining to sound, text and image. Students should be able to discuss how anthropology has approached expressive cultures and understand a range of cultural differences between themselves and others in this arena. The module should prepare them for further study in the fields of performative, textual and visual analysis.

        Skills

        Students should develop skills in literacy; oral communication; the organisation of logical arguments; effective presentation of written work; critical reflection on their own cultural assumptions and biases; and teamwork.

        Assessment

        Essay 2 70%, Essay 1 20%, Participation 10%

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        ESA1001

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Contemporary Europe
        Overview

        The module provides a wide-ranging introduction to political developments in contemporary Europe. Following analysis of the nature and consequences for Europe of the Cold War, the module analyses some of the major political, economic and security challenges Europe has had to face since 1989 including the processes of economic and political transformation in Central and Eastern Europe as well as war in the former Yugoslavia and Ukraine. Featuring prominently in the module are developments in the process of European integration with a primary focus on the EU, how it is organized and operates, what powers it has, the attitudes of selected states in contemporary Europe towards membership, and the effects of integration on them. In doing so, the module considers the origins and implications of the Eurozone crisis for European integration as well as public attitudes towards the process.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will
        1. Understand the historical background to contemporary Europe;
        2. Analyse critically selected major political developments and trends in Europe since the end of the Cold War;
        3. Appreciate key concepts and understandings associated with the political organization of Europe;
        4. Appreciate key concepts and understandings associated with the European Union as a political entity;
        5. Analyse how the major European states have engaged with the European Union since 1957;
        6. Understand public reactions to European integration.
        7. Appreciate selected major political and security challenges facing contemporary

        Skills

        The module will develop students' analytical, research and communication skills; allow students to refine their essay-writing skills; and enhance their abilities to think critically.

        Assessment

        Portfolio (45%), learning logs (10%) and Essay (45%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI1001

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Being Human: Evolution Culture and Society
        Overview

        This course is designed to introduce students to social anthropology through a discussion of the key concepts in the discipline, and a consideration of the principles which underlie family life, kinship, sexuality and gender relations, and gaining a livelihood in different parts of the world.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of this module, students will have been introduced to social anthropology, and should be aware of how social and cultural differences constitute variations on a number of basic themes. Students should also be aware of the ways in which anthropology is useful for the understanding of their own society as well as for the understanding of others.

        Skills

        Skills in literacy, oral communication, the organisation of arguments, effective presentation of written work, critical reflection on one's own cultural assumptions and biases.

        Assessment

        Essay submission 20%, Essay Submission 70% and continuous assessment 10%

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        ANT1001

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • A World on the Move:Historical and Anthropological Approaches to Globalization
        Overview

        This modules provides an anthropological introduction to the study of globalisation, using comparative case studies from the contemporary and the historical record, and outlining links with perspectives in the field of history. Among the issues discussed are: global and local linkages in a world of economic, cultural and political connectivity; cultural convergence and the expression of cultural difference; migration, refugees, trafficked people, tourism; diasporas, the idea of home and national borders; transnational family networks in the contemporary world; global and local regimes of power and resistance.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of this module, student should be aware of the complex ways in which globalising forces have influenced people's everyday experiences in different socio-cultural settings and changing historical contexts.

        Skills

        Students should develop skills in literacy; oral communication; the organisation of logical arguments; effective presentation of written work; and teamwork.

        Assessment

        Easy Submission 70%, Online Discussion 20% and Continual Assessment 10%

        Coursework

        80%

        Written

        20%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        ANT1003

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Us And them: Why do we have ingroups and outgroups?
        Overview

        Drawing theoretically on both cognitive and social anthropology and utilizing a wide range of case studies, from personal passions for particular sub-cultures of music and sport to national politics in Northern Ireland to global divides of religion and class, this module will introduce students to social groups.

        We will explore what makes human social groups different from those of other animals, psychological explanations of group commitment, and anthropological literature on symbols, rituals, and politics to examine how particular social groups are created and sustained and how some individuals become willing to fight and die for their fellow group members.

        Learning Outcomes

        Be able to describe and consider the implications of:

        1) The importance of social groups for individuals.

        2) How group identities and traditions are created.

        3) How groups continue from generation to generation.

        4) The similarities and differences between national, religious, sporting, class, and interest groups.

        5) How groups can convince individuals to die for them
        6) Why intergroup prejudice and conflict is so common.

        Skills

        The module will help foster the students’:

        Ability to consider the findings of multiple disciplines in addressing questions of human society.

        Ability to present ideas clearly in both oral and written formats

        Ability to research and analyse material from multiple disciplines

        Ability to debate and defend arguments

        Ability to engage in civil discourse about strongly held convictions

        Ability to prepare concise and focused presentations

        Assessment

        Continual Assessment (10%), Essay 1 (60%), Essay 2 (30%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        ANT1007

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

    • Year 2
      • Politics and Policy of the European Union
        Overview

        This module serves as in introduction to the European Union and demonstrates how this evolving and expanding tier of European governance impacts on national political systems . The module is divided into three parts. The first part sets the scene for the study of the EU and introduces students to the evolution of the EU, the treaty base and the theories of integration. The second part explores the composition and powers of the main EU institutions (such as the Commission, the European Parliament, the Council and the Courts). It also accounts for the decision making process and the role of NGOs in the EU system. The final part focuses on the EU policy base and seeks to explain where and why the EU is active in certain policy areas. It examines a series of salient policy areas including the common agricultural policy, environmental policy, foreign and defence policy, enlargement.

        Learning Outcomes

        To provide an understanding of the evolution of the European Union as the principal instrument of integration in Western Europe.

        Skills

        Development of critical and analytical skills. Emphasis on comparative methodology and the ability to synthesise knowledge in both written and oral form in a cross-national (European) context.

        Assessment

        Students must submit Two Essays/Reports (90%). Participation and attendance (10%).

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2001

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Modern Political Thought
        Overview

        This module focuses on a critical analysis of key texts and themes in the history of modern political thought. The study of the work of key thinkers in the modern era serves a range of purposes. Firstly, we can, in some instances, learn directly from these works, acquiring ideas that we can apply to our own circumstances. Secondly, through studying these texts we can learn about ourselves and our own political, ethical, and intellectual situation, through coming to a better understanding of how these works have contributed to shaping the world that we live in. Finally, through engaging with the complex arguments constructed in classic texts we can hope to learn how we might come to construct political arguments of our own. The choice of texts to be studied may vary from year to year.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will:
        - Be familiar with the central arguments of key texts in the history of modern political thought
        - Understand the main traditions of thought which have shaped contemporary political
        thinking
        - Be equipped with the analytical skills necessary to necessary to interpret and criticise
        complex arguments.

        Skills

        The aim of the module is to provide students with the necessary analytical and historical tools to approach major theoretical texts. It will provide students with an opportunity to develop communication skills (listening, oral and written), and equip students with basic intellectual skills (particulary critical thinking and analysis). It is fundamental to both further study, and future chances of employment, that students are able to present other people's arguments in an informed, coherent, and efficient manner, and be able to point out weaknesses in apparently plausible arguments.

        Assessment

        Essay 1 (35%), Essay 2 (55%), Presentation (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2005

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Irish Politics
        Overview

        An examination of the Politics of Ireland (North and South) since 1920.

        Learning Outcomes

        To provide an understanding of the political systems of both parts of Ireland and to understand Northern Ireland as an example of a deeply divided society.

        Skills

        The ability to think analytically, communicate ideas with peers, reproduce ideas in an exam setting, and construct cogent essays.

        Assessment

        Continual Assessment (55%), Essay (35%), Participation (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2013

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • International Relations
        Overview

        This module sets out to help students understand and analyse the development of International Relations as a discipline through its theories and major issues. The key theories of international relations are examined, from Realism, through Marxism to contemporary approaches such as Poststructuralism, with a focus upon how each one criticises and responds to the others revealing its strengths and weaknesses. Within this, major issues of international relations will be explored from a theoretical and conceptual perspective, such as the balance of power, peace, international society, norms and gender. Finally, the course turns to modern challenges to the discipline of International Relations, such as International Political Economy, the spread of Globalization, and contemporary concerns with security and the War on Terror. The module therefore considers how well International Relations is responding to these challenges.

        Learning Outcomes

        Upon completion of this module, students should be able to: Understand the main approaches to the study of IR, including current theoretical developments in the discipline. Understand the relationship between the academic analysis of international relations and the actual behaviour (e.g. foreign policy) of states. Communicate ideas to others in a clear and concise manner, both orally and in written form. Pursue intellectual questions in a rigorous and academic manner, employing analytical skills and critical thinking.

        Skills

        The module aims to equip students with basic intellectual skills (e.g. critical thinking, analysis, problem solving), as well as communication skills.

        Assessment

        Continual Assessment (10%), Essay (55%), Journal (35%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2017

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Studying Politics
        Overview

        Without understanding the methodology of research practice it is not possible to undertake political research effectively or to critically assess the work of others. Equally, without research skills it is not possible to test our assertions, assumptions, knowledge and preconceptions about the political world. Research methods are therefore crucial if we are to be able to address the important questions of ‘how do we know’ and ‘what is there to know’, which are critical in all fields of political studies. Consequently, this module has four aims. Firstly, to introduce students to the political research environment, incorporating both the elements and processes that underpin inquiry. Secondly, the module seeks to examine different methodologies and techniques to enable the undertaking of both original and critical research. Thirdly, to encourage candidates to develop a critical appreciation of data including both content and use. Fourthly, to promote a general awareness and working knowledge not only of the complexities of political research but also of the variety of environments in which research takes place.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

        • Describe the relationship between the researchers of, the actors in and the environment determining political and social processes.
        • Develop communication skills through computer lab participation and writing for coursework.
        • Identify both the strengths and weaknesses of different research techniques.
        • Pursue intellectual questions on the basis of interpretation and analysis of data in a rigorous and academic manner by employing analytical skills and critical thinking.
        • Critically assess the collection of data and understand its use as a tool for understanding political processes.
        • Evaluate and discriminate between qualitative and quantitative data analyses and, in doing so, demonstrate a willingness to implement good practice.
        • Interpret the research of others and appreciate the problems involved in both collection and interpretation of data.
        • Compare, contrast and choose between different quantitative research methods and justify the choice through an awareness and working knowledge of quantitative methodology.
        • Implement basic intellectual skills that include data understanding, analysis, numeracy, and problem solving.
        • Present research findings in an appropriate manner and communicate finding to others in a clear and concise manner in written form.

        Skills

        To think analytically and methodologically, to apply quantitative analysis techniques using specialised computer software, and to interpret and communicate results of statistical analyses.

        Assessment

        Assignment (30%), Presentation (10%), Research (60%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2043

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • American Politics
        Overview

        This survey course introduces students to the American political system, current debates on democracy in America and its role in the world. The first section of the module, examines the basic institutions of the American political system, its origins, development and evolving dynamics. Particular emphasis is placed on the US Constitution, federalism and the system of checks and balances, as well as the three branches of government: the Presidency, Congress and the Supreme Court. The second section constitutes a more normative engagement with issues relating to the contemporary nature of American democracy, examining in particular controversies surrounding the electoral process and the role of socioeconomic inequality and race in shaping political outcomes.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will acquire an understanding of the basic components of the American political system and its historical and ideational origins. Students will be conversant with contemporary debates on the nature of democracy and its socio-economic context in America.

        Skills

        Ability to think conceptually and pursue rigorous, systematic inquiry into some aspect(s) of American Politics. Ability to construct a lucid argument, theoretically and empirically informed, in examination paper form, and to present oral arguments in a concise manner.

        Assessment

        Analysis of Data (35%), Essay (55%), Participation and Attendance (10%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2018

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Key Debates in Anthropology
        Overview

        This module will examine the theme of culture from an anthropological perspective. Focusing on an assortment of critical thinkers and formative texts, it addresses the relation of culture to race, society, history, practice, embodiment, emotions, power, the politics of identity, the state, and globalization. The course examines some of the foremost anthropologists who have contributed to these topics, drawing on functionalist, structuralist, Marxist, reflexive and other traditions of thought.

        Learning Outcomes

        One objective of the module is that the students acquire a firm grasp of the key principles and theoretical perspectives of social and cultural anthropology. A second objective is that the students develop an ability to apply these principles and perspectives to a broad range of ethnographic and other materials. In its emphasis on the development of critical thinking, the module will therefore make a larger contribution by equipping students in relation to other anthropology - and non-anthropology - modules to take.

        Skills

        To develop critical reading skills with respect to anthropological texts, and to develop debating skills in class. To develop the critical faculties of the students with respect to cultural discourses.

        Assessment

        Essay Submission One (30%); Essay Submission Two (60%); Continuous Assessment (10%).

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        ANT2022

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Skills in the Field: Ethnographic methods
        Overview

        Preparing and guiding students for a period of personal research in the long vacation. Includes the selection of a research topic, documentary and bibliographical search, training in quantitative and qualitative research techniques.
        In addition, students will consider the ethical implications of their research, as well as show awareness of the risk factors involved.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students should develop the ability to devise an anthropological research topic and plan field research using existing social skills and standard research techniques. Students should also be able to assess the potential risks involved in their chosen research, and assess the ethical implications of their planned work.

        Skills

        Skills in devising a research proposal and in collecting and sorting information. Students should develop skills in the following areas:

        - bibliographical research;
        - design a manageable research project;
        - assess usefulness of different research techniques
        - assess ethical implications of research
        - oral and written presentations
        - time management

        Assessment

        Project (90%), Tutorial Contribution (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        ANT2030

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Security and Terrorism
        Overview

        This module explores contemporary approaches to the study of security and terrorism. It will examine changes in definitions of security and terrorism, the evolution of approaches to the study of security and terrorism. Students will be familiarised with the main “threats” to state and human security; the changing nature of war and other organised violence; and areas of security policy and practice including arms control, alliance formation, peacekeeping and peacebuilding, among others. Students will also explore domestic and transnational non-state terrorism, state terrorism, and counter-terrorism policy and practice.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of the course students will:
        • Be familiar with the main theories and approaches to the study of security and terrorism; and the debates between them.
        • Understand and be able to discuss the relative merits of different theoretical approaches to security issues.
        • Be able to critically evaluate international policy and practice in key areas of security policy and counter-terrorism.
        • Be able to communicate ideas to others in a clear and concise manner, both orally and in written form;
        • Be able to pursue intellectual questions in a rigorous and academic manner, employing analytical skills and critical thinking.

        Skills

        Managing & Prioritizing Knowledge: identify relevant and subject-specific knowledge, sources and data; manage such information in an independent manner.
        • Analytical Thinking: identify, understand, interpret and evaluate relevant subject-specific arguments made by others; construct independent arguments.
        • Critical & Independent Thinking: ability to think critically and construct one’s own position in relation to existing and ongoing debates in the field.

        Communication Skills, including oral and written communication.
        • Time-Management
        • Information Technology skills;
        • Organisation and communication skills;
        • Enterprise Thinking.

        Assessment

        Coursework (55%), Coursework (35%), Tutorial Attendance (10%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2055

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • International Organisations
        Overview

        This module on International Organizations offers an introduction into the multilateral global security architecture. The core focus of the module is collective security. The module IO thus will deal with international law, collective security, regimes in international security and International security organizations. The United Nations system forms the core of the study. Peacekeeping, peace enforcement, peace building and the ‘outsourcing’ of core collective security tasks to regional players will dominate the sessions of the module. Core military interventions by international organizations will be analyzed. The module thus will deal with military interventions by the UN, NATO, CIS/CSTO, EU and core security and mediation tasks by the CIS, SCO and OSCE. The new policy agenda of energy security will be tackled by studying resource control: The NPT regime, the IAEA and oil and gas regimes thus will be scrutinized at the end of the semester. The major aim of the module is to outline the ‘institutionalized’ world order of today – with its hierarchies, cleavages and contradictions. The module is wedded to a strategic studies approach to IR.

        Learning Outcomes

        None

        Skills

        None

        Assessment

        Coursework (55%), Coursework (35%), Participation (10%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2056

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Apocalypse! End of the World.
        Overview

        The aim of the course is to introduce students to historical and anthropological reflection on millennial / millenarian beliefs and movements across space and time. Taking a long view of historical events and using case studies of present-day groups that attend to ideas about the end of the world, taking advantage of the interdisciplinary character of the School, and using a wide range of primary sources, including novels, film, websites, and ethnographic case studies and film, this course will invite students to consider the ancient roots of millennial theory; its foundational texts, exponents / prophets and movements; examples of well-known failed and successful millennial claims and movements, including the Crusades, radical puritans, Mormons, Jewish Zionists, American evangelicals, new religious movements, including UFO and suicide cults, and radical Islamists; the use of millennial theory as presentist critique; the development of millennial majorities, and the social, cultural and political implications of their dominance; millennialism’s place in utopian theory; and a final consideration of theoretical rejoinders, in which the course leaders encourage students to consider whether millennial claims might be right – for example, in terms of global warming – and whether that might change the way in which historians and anthropologists should approach the subject.

        Learning Outcomes

        An understanding of the broad history and anthropology of millennial movements across space and time; An ability to discuss millennial ideas and movements using heuristic tools from history and anthropology; An ability to use electronic resources and to develop key research skills; Effective communication skills; An ability to write an informed analysis of historical problems discussed in the module; An ability to work independently.

        Skills

        Enhanced ability to think critically, reason logically, and evaluate evidence; Further develop communication skills, both written and oral; Critical appraisal of, engagement with, and effective use of a variety of historical and anthropological sources.

        Assessment

        Essay 30%, Essay 60%; Tutorial Participation 10%

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HAP2065

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Business Anthropology for the Digital Age
        Overview

        Business Anthropology for the Digital Age delivers an introduction to the field of business anthropology as both an applied social science and critical understanding of consumer and organisational cultures, digital contexts and engagements and design processes. The course provides a critical reading of ‘anthropology in business’ in concert with providing practical insights into the role of consumer ethnography/netnography in contemporary business practices. It also engages with the ways in which culture shapes institutional and corporate organisations.

        Learning Outcomes

        1.Understand where anthropology and ethnography can be usefully applied in business settings, in particular in relation to consumer, design, and organisational processes.
        2. Understand how digital contexts are changing both the way in which anthropology is utilised and its role in consumer, design, and organisational processes.
        3. Learn to critically engage with the place of anthropology in business/corporate practices as an applied social science. Further, understand anthropology’s critique on how such practices take place.
        4. Select and make use of ethnographic case studies of business practices in an applied and critical fashion.
        5. Understand and engage questions of ethics and responsibility in business practices. Question the issue of ethical limitations in business contexts.
        6. Improve interpersonal and team building skills through in class group exercises.
        7. Hone technology skills through dedicated assessments.
        8.Learn to critically assess anthropology of business scholarly literature whilst also engaging beyond the disciplinary approach through reading business literature and case studies, thereby understanding the multidisciplinary approach to the role of anthropology in business.
        9. Understand the role of collaboration in anthropology in business practices.
        10. Understand career pathways for anthropologists in business/corporate spaces.

        Skills

        None.

        Assessment

        • Coursework - 60%
        • Coursework - 30%
        • Tutorial Participation - 10%

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        ANT2036

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Hanging out on Street Corners: Public and applied Anthropology
        Overview

        The course is designed to introduce students to qualitative, ethnographic, methodologies and particularly explore their applied use in the social sciences and policy analysis. It will examine the differences between qualitative and quantitative methodologies, understanding the strengths and weaknesses of each. This will allow students to be able to argue for the utility of ethnographic methodologies in further modules (dissertation).

        The course will then look at the utility of ethnography and anthropology in applied situations. In doing so the course will present an understanding of environments in which ethnography can be used in ‘problem solving’ and as a tool for ‘policy’ understanding a critique. The course will look at the possibility of an anthropology of policy and an approach to organisations. It will look at the strengths and weaknesses of ethnography in rapid problem solving. The course will look at specific case studies and examples and students will be asked to develop their own skills through presentations and analysis of case studies. The course will encourage internships and act as a preparation for dissertation modules in semester 2 (year 2) and semester 1 (year 3).

        Learning Outcomes

        To develop awareness of how qualitative/anthropological methods – ethnography and participant observation - might provide skills that have practical applications away from the academy.

        To develop and understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

        To develop skills necessary in the utilisation of anthropology such as report & proposal writing, team work, presentation and communication skills.

        To develop confidence and ability to work within a team and under pressure of time.

        To develop a critical understanding of ethnographic research when applied to areas of policy.

        To critically analyse ethical issues related to ethnographic fieldwork.

        To analyse the relationship between anthropology and other disciplines and professional areas.

        To develop early engagement with dissertation topics, possibly through internships.

        Skills

        The module will help foster the students’:

        Ability to consider the findings of multiple disciplines in addressing questions of human society.

        Ability to utilise interpersonal skills

        Ability to work in teams

        Ability to present ideas clearly in both oral and written formats

        Ability to research and analyse material from multiple disciplines

        Ability to debate and defend arguments

        Ability to engage in civil discourse about strongly held convictions

        Ability to prepare concise and focused presentations

        Assessment

        Portfolio (50%)/ Class essay (30%)/ Presentation (20%)

        Coursework

        80%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        20%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        ANT2038

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Human Morality
        Overview

        Being the most complex social species, human beings possess many competencies to deal with social interaction, including the capacity to make moral judgments that evaluate and regulate human behaviour (i.e., judgments on whether an action is right or wrong, and on whether someone deserves reward or punishment). Drawing from the anthropological and psychological literature on the matter, the module introduces the student to the various aspects of human morality, discussing the following types of issues:

        - Are moral judgments totally relative to one’s culture or are there universal components of human morality?
        - Is human morality based solely on religion?
        - Are moral judgments framed by distinct concerns such as care/harm, justice/injustice, loyalty/betrayal, hierarchy/subversion, and purity/impurity or are they always related to a specific concern with basic human rights?
        - Can the configuration of different moral concerns shed light on different political attitudes and ideologies, such as conservatism and liberalism, and their disagreement on a variety of topics, such as abortion, homosexuality, and economic equality?
        - Although the intentional causation of harm is normally prohibited, why in many situations (e.g., in the punishment of heinous crimes, in the interrogation of suspected terrorists, or in the context of wars and revolutions) people have conflicting intuitions about the boundaries of such prohibition?

        Learning Outcomes

        Be able to describe and consider the implications of:

        - current anthropological and psychological approaches to the various aspects of human morality;
        - the interplay between cultural learning and basic psychological dispositions in the domain of morality
        - moral judgments to politics and the law.

        Skills

        The module will help foster students’:

        - Ability to consider the findings of multiple disciplines in addressing the topic of morality.
        - Ability to present ideas clearly in both oral and written formats.
        - Ability to research and critically analyse material from multiple disciplines.
        - Ability to debate and defend arguments.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        40%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        60%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        ANT2039

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Northern Ireland Conflict and paths to peace
        Overview

        What caused the Northern Irish conflict? What factors sustained it? What role did world leaders, paramilitaries, clergy and local politicians play in progressing the peace process? And what role does civil society, arts, culture and heritage play in building social cohesion?
        This interdisciplinary, team-taught module will draw on expertise from across the School of History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics to explore some of the key themes of the Global Bachelor’s Program. Using Northern Ireland as a case study, it will ask questions about the means through which societies can move from conflict to peace, about the roles that various actors can play in conflict resolution, and about the roles that public representations and explorations of the past can play both in entrenching divisions and in furthering peace and mutual understanding.

        Learning Outcomes

        By the end of this module the successful student should be able to demonstrate in assessed essays, coursework and seminar contributions:
        - A familiarity with the major issues and debates around the development of the Northern Ireland conflict, the peace process, and the role of civil society in peace-building. - A sense of the interrelatedness of political, economic, cultural and social forces in shaping the past
        - An appreciation of the internal and external forces that contributed to the conflict AND helped build peace
        - A heightened sense of the complexity of identity, politics and place in Northern Ireland
        - Demonstrable awareness of the role that arts, culture, heritage and public engagement with the past can play in building social integration.

        Skills

        On completion of this module the student should be able to:
        - Understand and process complex information
        - Engage in sustained and self-directed reading
        - Engage in intellectual discussion based on reading and class content
        - Communicate complex information effectively and with precision in oral presentation and in writing to an academic audience

        Assessment

        Essay 3,000 words 50%
        Reading Journal entries x 4 40%
        Tutorial Participation 10%

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HAP2001

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Peace and Conflict Studies
        Overview

        This module will introduce students to the analysis of civil wars and the fields of conflict analysis and peace studies. The aim of this module is to introduce students to theoretical and empirical problems in the study of the outbreak, development and resolution of armed civil conflicts. It explores the conflict cycle, the complexity of violent conflict, dynamics of political violence, the effects of certain situations on conflict dynamics, different types of actors in civil war, the outcomes of civil war, peace processes, and techniques such as mediation. It explores the main concepts (such as “conflict”, “civil war”, “peace”, etc.), some theories (such as the causes of civil war, the dynamics, and consequences), and some issues and debates (such as when and how to mediate conflicts) in peace and conflict studies. It also covers theoretical and methodological issues in peace and conflict studies, such as issues in classification and measurement.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will:
        -Understand basic approaches to the causes, development and resolution of conflicts
        - Be able to identify and critically evaluate central concepts, issues, debates, and obstacles in civil wars, conflict resolution and peace
        - Be able to explain, critically evaluate, and discuss central questions and theories on causes, development and resolution of conflicts
        - Conduct independent research by independently finding, gathering, and evaluating information and texts on armed conflicts and peace
        - Be able to recognise and differentiate between descriptive, explanative and normative studies
        - Be able to distinguish between and locate primary and secondary sources of information
        - Be able to identify different approaches to conceptualization and measurement of key variables as they relate to Peace and Conflict Studies
        - Communicate ideas to others in a clear and concise manner, both orally and in written form
        - Pursue intellectual questions in a rigorous and academic manner, employing analytical skills and critical thinking.

        Skills

        This module will assist in developing students’ skills in a number of important areas. These include:

        Intellectual skills
        - Managing & Prioritizing Knowledge: identify relevant and subject-specific knowledge, sources and data; manage such information in an independent manner
        - Analytical Thinking: identify, understand, interpret and evaluate relevant subject-specific arguments made by others; construct independent arguments
        - Critical & Independent Thinking: ability to think critically and construct one’s own position in relation to existing and ongoing debates in the field

        Professional and career development skills
        - Communication Skills: ability to communicate clearly with others, both orally and in writing
        - Teamwork: ability to work with others in a team, negotiate conflicts and recognize different ways of learning
        - Diversity: ability to acknowledge and be sensitive to the range of cultural differences present in the learning environment
        - Self-Reflexivity: ability to reflect on one’s own progress and identify and act upon ones own development needs with respect to life-long learning and career development
        - Time Management: ability to negotiate diverse and competing pressures; cope with stress; and achieve a work / life balance

        Technical and practical skills
        - Information Technology: demonstrate the knowledge and ability to use contemporary and relevant ICT

        Organizational skills
        - Efficient and effective work practice: demonstrate ability to work efficiently to deadlines
        - Clear organisation of information: show efficiency in the organisation of large amounts of complex information and the ability to identify, describe and analyse the key features of the information
        - Organisation and communication: demonstrate ability to use evidence to develop logical and clear arguments; show aptitude for the effective use of information in a direct and appropriate way
        - Enterprising thinking: Demonstrate ability to think and argue in novel and enterprising ways, to display originality of thought and argument and the ability to clearly support arguments in innovative ways

        Assessment

        1 Policy Report - 35%; 1 Essay - 55%; 1 Presentation - 10%

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2065

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Identity Politics in Diverse Societies
        Overview

        Liberal values in Europe, as elsewhere, are coming under serious threat, driven by identity politics designed to exploit societal divisions. The historical link between liberalism and diversity in Europe, and the extent to which one can negotiate and accommodate, if not facilitate the other, holds the key to sustainable, coherent and peaceful societies. The module provides an overview and critical analysis of minority protection offering engagement with issues underpinning national politics, law and societal processes in Europe. Using a critical approach to contemporary politics, this module provides:

        - a historical analysis of state formation and nation building in Europe with context of religious wars and political revolutions, including the (re-)conceptualisation of basic concepts and terms such as territoriality, sovereignty, state, nation and citizenship;

        - reassesses primordial views on ethnicity/nationality and language & religious identities and provides a sociologically informed political lens to reconcile the requirements for political unity, obligations to international law and ensure social cohesion for the culturally diverse society;

        - examines the liberal and national ideological framings of equality protection in liberal-democratic regimes and the number of mechanisms from voting rights to proportional representation in state bodies, forms of cultural and territorial autonomy and federalism to engage with the challenges of the ongoing re-nationalisation in all parts of Europe.

        This module will help students interested in European politics, human and minority rights, governance and nationalism, and politics of diverse societies to understand the origins of and anticipate political developments of their increasingly diverse societies.

        Learning Outcomes

        - Place issues of governance in diverse societies in the context of domestic and European political and legal obligations to ensure equality of all citizens;

        - Contrast the differential impact nation-state building had in different parts of Europe on diverse resident populations and reflect on the role of European integration on political process;

        - Ascertain importance of diversity and equality as guarantee for societal stability and peace in and around Europe

        - Understand and be able to reflect critically on the impact accommodation and support for minorities has on the likelihood of conflict in contemporary Europe

        - Communicate clearly and concisely, both orally and in written form on issues relating to equality and diversity in contemporary Europe

        - Pursue intellectual questions in an academic manner, using analytical skills and critical thinking to develop transferrable skills

        Skills

        Intellectual skills

        - Managing & Prioritizing Knowledge: identify relevant and subject-specific knowledge, sources and data; manage such information in an independent manner

        - Critical & Independent Thinking: ability to think critically and construct one’s own position in relation to existing and ongoing debates in the field

        Professional and career development skills

        - Communication Skills: ability to communicate clearly with others, both orally and in writing

        - Teamwork: ability to work with others in a team, negotiate conflicts and recognize different ways of learning

        - Self-Reflexivity: ability to reflect on one’s own progress and identify and act upon ones own development needs with respect to life-long learning and career development

        - Time Management: ability to negotiate diverse and competing pressures; cope with stress; and achieve a work / life balance

        Technical and practical skills

        - Information Technology: demonstrate the knowledge and ability to use contemporary and relevant ICT Organizational skills

        - Efficient and effective work practice: demonstrate ability to work efficiently to deadlines

        - Clear organisation of information: show efficiency in the organisation of large amounts of complex information and the ability to identify, describe and analyse the key features of the information

        - Organisation and communication: demonstrate ability to use evidence to develop logical and clear argument; show aptitude for the effective use of information in a direct and appropriate way

        Assessment

        The module each covers various elements and study techniques to approach, appreciate and understand issues underpinning politics in diverse societies. The module is designed in a lecture/tutorial format to introduce students to a range of issues not necessarily in clear sight outside the classroom in Belfast.

        Throughout the module, in lectures and tutorials students will be introduced to interdisciplinary method of assessing political process in diverse societies by discussing comparative political, legal, and social science methodologies. Students will be introduced to independent work as part of the assessment (see below) via literature assessment and synthesis.

        The module builds upon – but does not rely on – the PAI2011 Deeply Divided Societies offering a perspective on state led management of diversity that did not result in conflict. It offers an opportunity to consolidate the content learnt over L1 and L2, prepare students for independent learning in L3 and facilitates reflection on contemporary political issues.

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2066

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

    • Year 3
      • Contemporary Political Philosophy
        Overview

        This module examines problems in contemporary normative political philosophy. Topics may vary from year to year, but will typically include questions about the interpretation of values such as freedom, equality, and welfare, principles of distributive justice, equal respect and social recognition, pluralism, toleration, and democracy.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will:
        -be in a position to think critically about the normative aspects of political life,
        -understand and be able to construct normative arguments about moral and political problems.
        -be able to structure logical arguments involving abstract ideas in both discussion and written work.

        Skills

        Note-taking both at lectures and during private study of key texts; ability to structure tightly knit arguments concerning abstract ideas in both oral and written form; debating and other oral communication skills; teamwork in small groups; role play.

        Assessment

        Students must submit Two Essays/Coursework (90%). Continuous Assessment (10%).

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3025

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Internship
        Overview

        This double-weighted module, which is made available on a competitive basis, enables successful applicants to spend three working days per week for 12 weeks, in either the first or second semesters, with one of a range of public and private organisations in Northern Ireland and elsewhere. Previous student placements have been with the devolved government departments, the Equality Commission, the Police Ombudsman’s Office, the BBC, the Northern Ireland Local Government Association, the PSNI and a number of PR and consultancy firms. The module is an alternative to either the dissertation or the project for Level Three Single and Major Honours candidates and to Level Three Joint Honours candidates. To be eligible to apply, students on these pathways must have taken and passed PAI2043 – Studying Politics, at Level Two. The module offers a hands-on, workplace-based learning opportunity in the participating institutions during which they will contribute to their work and undertake a piece of assessed research work (the Project element of the module) that is academically rigorous and, ideally, enhances the operation of the relevant host institution.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will have significantly developed their administrative knowledge and capacity; acquired a clear understanding of the work, organisation and operation of the host institution; produced a body of work that is both academically sound and, ideally, of practical utility for the host institution; and developed and acquired a range of skills (see below) including working within a team setting and complying with the norms and ethical standards of a professional working environment. Students will also have learned to locate their applied experience with academic interests and concerns.

        Skills

        Intellectual skills
        - Managing & Prioritizing Knowledge: identify relevant and project-specific knowledge, sources and data; manage such information in an independent manner
        - Analytical Thinking: identify, understand, interpret and evaluate relevant subject-specific arguments made by others; construct independent arguments
        - Critical & Independent Thinking: ability to think critically and construct one’s own position in relation to existing tasks and ongoing debates in the field

        Professional and career development skills
        - Communication Skills: ability to communicate clearly with others, both orally and in writing
        - Teamwork: ability to work with others in a team, negotiate conflicts and recognize different ways of learning
        - Diversity: ability to acknowledge and be sensitive to the range of cultural differences present in the working environment
        - Self-Reflexivity: ability to reflect on one’s own progress and identify and act upon one’s own development needs with respect to life-long learning and career development
        - Time Management: ability to negotiate diverse and competing workplace pressures; cope with stress; and achieve a work / life balance

        Technical and practical skills
        - Information Technology: demonstrate the knowledge and ability to use contemporary and relevant ICT, and to learn new IT skills
        - Regulations and standards: students will be made aware of the current rules and regulations concerning information management and security in the workplace

        Organizational skills
        - Efficient and effective work practice: demonstrate ability to work efficiently to deadlines, both individually and as part of a team
        - Clear organisation of information: show efficiency in the organisation of large amounts of complex information and the ability to identify, describe and analyse the key features of the information
        - Organisation and communication: demonstrate ability to use evidence to develop logical and clear arguments; show aptitude for the effective use of information in a direct and appropriate way
        - Enterprising thinking: Demonstrate ability to think and argue in novel and enterprising ways, to display originality of thought and argument and the ability to clearly support arguments in innovative ways

        Assessment

        - Attendance for 36 days total in host workplace organisation
        - Submission of both forms of assessment- Journal (30%), Project (70%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        40

        Module Code

        PAI3097

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Gender and Politics
        Overview

        This module introduces students to the centrality of gender and sexuality in shaping political dynamics at the local, national and global level. It approaches the topic from three perspectives - feminist political thought; strategies for political mobilization and change; and the relevance of gender in international affairs. The module aims to offer an introduction to the contribution of feminist intersectional scholarship in challenging understandings of politics and international relations as gender-neutral and draws attention to the, often neglected, experiences, agency and political claims of gender minorities. It considers key contemporary issues such as intersectionality and feminist politics, sexuality and reproductive justice; social movements and anti-gender politics; war, peace and security; climate change and the politics of global crises.
        Lectures will chart the development of feminism in its diverse ideological strands and ‘waves’.
        Students will have the opportunity to discuss theoretical perspectives and empirical examples as entry points to the gendered complexities of global politics.

        Learning Outcomes

        To provide a political perspective on gender; to clarify the diversity of feminist thought; to analyse and explain the causes of women's inequality in the public and private realms; and to provide an understanding of the inequalities confronting women.

        Skills

        The ability to comprehend the politics of sex and gender in an historical and theoretical framework; to develop a political perspective on gender; to debate positions; to engage in small group activity; to improve oral presentation and essay-writing skills.

        Assessment

        Weekly research tasks 10%
        Learning Journal 35%
        Essay 55%

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3008

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Dissertation (Politics and International Studies)
        Overview

        The dissertation is a research project that the student develops, designs and implements. There is a Dissertation Synopsis of approximately 700 words and the end product is a substantial piece of written work of 12,000 words on a topic that has been agreed between the student and his/her supervisor.

        Learning Outcomes

        By the end of the dissertation, students will be able to: (a) develop a sustained argument, test a hypothesis, and/or write an original narrative; (b) carry out research including finding appropriate sources of information for the topic in question; (c) review appropriate theories for the topic.

        Skills

        Students participate in a workshop prior to registering for the dissertation, which focuses on how to formulate a dissertation question, how to research the dissertation and how to organise and write the dissertation. Further consultation and skills development with individual advisors. A further workshop is held at the start of the second semester. Students will work closely with an individual supervisor throughout the research, drafting and writing of their dissertation. The skill required for ongoing research and writing of a dissertation are acquired and monitored through liason with the supervisor.

        Assessment

        Dissertation synopsis (10%) Dissertation (90%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        40

        Module Code

        PAI3099

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Politics of Performance: From Negotiation to Display
        Overview

        This module brings together the ecological, sensorial and political relations of performance in comparative analyses of intercultural practices from around the globe. We will explore how human and other-than-human aspects of sound, image and movement generate various modalities of ‘attunement’ between oneself and one’s environment to inform a politics of performance. By attending to the particularities of sound, voice, affect, reaction and resonance, we will analyse differentiated ‘atmospherics’ (Eisenlohr 2011) of negotiation, display and contestation. We will then examine how the politics of sound, image and movement give rise to expressions of resistance, resilience and reconciliation. Central to critically engaged performativity is a diversity of environments, environmental change and the ecological relations that they entail. Taking space, place and the effects of climate change seriously, we will further examine how the politics of being and belonging stem from different ways of knowing, sensing and performing self, other and the ‘other-than-human’ in these environments. Using a series of key settings, the module will reveal the political effects of sound, language, voice, positionality and performativity.

        Some case studies that will exemplify this environmental and performative politics include i). an analysis of indigenous protest and resistance in song, theatre and public display, focusing on processes of fragmentation, recombination and reclamation; ii). art as a process of reconciliation, negotiation and spectacle, foregrounding identities, rights and policy agendas; iii). political imagery e.g. street art and graffiti; and iv). improvisatory music-making in refugee camps and conflict zones, addressing tension, liminality and resilience. Finally, the module will take into account the ongoing effects of Covid19 as artists and performers reposition their voices in a digitally interconnected world. We will examine how expanding technologies are transforming the power of performance and reshaping how processes of creativity are politically motivated and communicated.

        Learning Outcomes

        We will be using informal self and group assessment methods during the module to monitor learning outcomes and to reflect on the development of conceptual skills of the following:

        • Knowledge of key approaches to the anthropology of the senses, the anthropology of music, arts and performance and music in peacebuilding.
        • Ability to discuss critically the importance of multi-sensoriality and performativity in case studies from different cultural contexts.
        • Knowledge of the role of performance, poetics in protest, politics, nationalism and expressions of Indigenous rights.
        • Ability to work critically with central concepts in the politics of performance.
        • Ability to analyse the relationship between different arts/performance genres across distinct performative arenas, e.g. parliamentary, theatrical, ritual and staged events.
        • Competence in dealing with issues of cultural diversity in academia.

        Skills

        • Ability to analyse performative issues and their political implications through relevant anthropological and ethnomusicological frameworks.
        • Ability to research and critically analyse a range of information sources effectively.
        • Demonstrate skills development in conducting music and arts research online.
        • Ability to express anthropological ideas clearly and logically.
        • Ability to debate and defend arguments.
        • Ability to work with other students in groups.
        • Experience in musical participation and reflection.

        Assessment

        Minor Essay; Portfolio; Tutorial/ensemble/online participatory attendance (depending upon Covid restrictions).

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        ESA3002

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Earth, Energy, Ethics and Economy: The Politics of Unsustainability
        Overview

        The continuing problematic relationship between key dynamics of modern economic and social systems and the non-human world is one of the most pressing issues of the 21st century and will continue shape the political agenda both nationally and globally. This module will examine some of the key debates of the politics of sustainable development, including: green ethical and political theory; the role of the environment and nature in political theorising; the economic and policy alternatives to unsustainable development and the normative underpinnings of a sustainable society.

        Learning Outcomes

        Upon completion of this module students will: Have a firm understanding of the key ethical, political and economic dimensions of green theory Be able to identify and understand the varieties of schools of thinking with green theory. Have a firm understanding of sustainable development; Be able to relate green theory to the politics of sustainable development; Be able to relate green political theory to other schools of thought within contemporary political theory; Be able to articulate and defend their own understandings of both green political theory and sustainable development; Be able to relate the empirical and scientific arguments and debates about sustainable development to normative theorising about sustainable development; Be able to defend and explain interdisciplinary methodological approaches to the study of sustainable development

        Skills

        Knowledge of the main issues, thinkers, schools of thought and debates within green political and ethical theory; knowledge of the political, economic and ethical dimensions of debates about sustainable development; ability for independent research and study; critical, analytical and independent thinking; presenting informed arguments in class; critical independent and reasoned judgement and assessment and appreciation of the arguments of others; awareness and appreciation of the complexities and nuances of different normative positions; relating the issues, thinkers and schools of thought covered in this module to other modules that students have done in Politics or other pathways.

        Assessment

        Logbook (10%), 2 essays (1 x 1500-2000 words; 1 x 2500-3000 words) (90%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3026

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • European Cultural Identities
        Overview

        An examination of the range of concepts related to the notion of identity in modern and contemporary Europe. The module offers an interdisciplinary survey of the construction of identity in localities, regions, and states of Western Europe, with a particular emphasis on the role of identity in cultural integration and diversity

        Learning Outcomes

        To introduce students to the notion of identity and the various factors (linguistic, ethnic, national, social, historical) which have contributed to the identity of western Europeans.

        Skills

        Development of critical and analytical skills. Emphasis on comparative methodology and the ability to synthesise knowledge in both written and oral form in a cross-national (European) context.

        Assessment

        Essay 1 (55%), Essay 2 (35%), Participation and Attendance (10%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3027

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Human-Animal Relations: An Anthropological Perspective
        Overview

        Anthropology is 'the study of Man', but this module sets out to explore the boundaries of 'humanity'. The focus is on human relationships with animals in different societies and cultures around the world. We shall look at useful animals, at harmful animals, and at symbolic animals. We shall also look at animals as objects (which are exploited in myriad ways) and at animals as persons (with which humans enter into intimate relations). These themes will be examined by means of a number of detailed ethnographic case studies of human-animal relations in different societies.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students should have developed a critical understanding of the relationship between humans and animals across time and space a sound knowledge of the relevant ethnographic and comparative research in these areas. The module introduces students to theoretical approaches to understanding human-animal relations as a complement to their training in anthropological theory and methodology acquired in their other courses.

        Skills

        To develop critical analytical skills and presentational skills both oral and written. Bibliographic search skills and the ability to develop written argument.

        Assessment

        Short essay (30%); long essay (60%); attendance and participation at workshops (10%)

        Coursework

        40%

        Written

        60%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        ANT3027

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Politics of the Global Economy
        Overview

        This module examines how politics conceived as relations between governments and with and between various socio-economic interests and groups shapes the global economy and the power relations it represents. Various issues addressed in the module include: how to think about power and authority in the global economy; contrasting national models of capitalism; the United States as a global economic hegemon in the post 9/11 era; the political economy of the rise of BRIC; the Doha Round of trade talks; Credit Crunch (causes, implications and responses); the geo-politics of currency rivalry; the global governance of oil; and a new global economic order to replace the old order?

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will:

        Students will understand the importance of politics and the role of power in the global economy.

        Students will be able to debate a range of contemporary global economic issues with reference to the relevant academic literature.

        Students will have an appreciation and understanding of some of the key policy issues to be faced in the management of the global economy, the theoretical and normative debates surrounding them and the trade offs they entail.

        Students will be able to communicate ideas concisely and coherently in written and oral form.

        Students will be able to pursue intellectual questions in a rigorous and academic manner, based on analytical and critical thinking.

        Skills

        Students will be able to communicate ideas to others in coherent and concise, written and oral form;

        Students will be able to think analytically, critically and logically about a range of important contemporary social issues.

        Students will have the capacity to identify many of the key causes, strategies and motivations of contemporary global economic trends and developments.

        Assessment

        Assignment (35%)

        Critical Review (10%)

        Coursework (55%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3063

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Far Right in Western Europe and North America
        Overview

        Right-wing extremist parties have experienced success in elections in a number of countries in Western Europe over the last two or three decades. This phenomenon has attracted widespread attention, both in the media and in academic circles, sparking a number of frequently asked questions: why have these parties suddenly become electorally successful? What exactly do they stand for? What kind of people vote for them? Why do people vote for them? Why have they experienced more success in some countries than in others? Should we be worried about their rise? And what can we, or mainstream political parties, do to counter their rise?

        This module aims to examine all these questions. It begins by introducing students to the theoretical perspectives and key bodies of literature on the nature of right wing extremism in contemporary Europe, and it explores the complex conceptual, analytical and terminological debates surrounding this subject of enquiry. It places particular emphasis on the politics of the far right in France, Germany and the United Kingdom after 1945. It engages in empirical investigations into the ideology and the electoral base of different right-wing extremist parties across Western Europe and, in so doing, it also examines the question of why some right-wing extremist parties have been electorally more successful than others. It finishes by exploring the impact that right-wing extremist parties have had on public debate, policy-making and party competition over the last 30 years and by considering how mainstream parties have attempted to counter the rise and growing influence of the parties of the extreme right.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will acquire knowledge of and engage with major debates within the literature on the far right. Students will be in a position to apply definitions and classifications of right-wing extremism to case studies so as to compare and contrast the ideologies right-wing extremist parties across Western Europe. Students will be able to identify and assess the reasons that explain why some right-wing extremist parties have been electorally more successful than others and be able assess the impact of right-wing extremism on public debate, policy-making and party competition across Western Europe and relate the academic study of right-wing extremism to questions of public and political concern.

        Skills

        Intellectual skills

        • Critical and independent thinking: the ability to think critically and to construct one’s own position/argument in relation to leading debates within the field
        • Synthesis of information: the skill of collecting, analyzing and synthesizing information from a variety of web and library sources via oral debates and written work.
        • Case study analysis: the knowledge and use of relevant case studies to illustrate, to support or to challenge key arguments and debates.


        Professional and career development skills

        • Communication skills: the ability to clearly communicate one’s position both orally and in writing.
        • Advocacy skills: the ability to present and sustain a convincing argument.

        Organizational skills

        • Preparatory skills: always being well prepared for tutorials (e.g. required reading)
        • Time management: effective use of study time, meeting coursework deadlines
        • Independent research: making good use of the library and the materials available

        Assessment

        Essay (30%), Group Work (60%), Participation and Attendance (10%)

        Coursework

        40%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        60%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3056

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Political Parties and Elections in Northern Ireland
        Overview

        This module analyses political parties and elections in Northern Ireland. The module is motivated by the following simple question: What drives citizens’ party choice in Northern Ireland elections. The module situates the Northern Ireland case in the context of the international literature on political and electoral institutions. Specifically, given the consociational institutional context of Northern Ireland, what expectations should we have of how citizens choose parties at election time? The module assesses the relative importance of ‘conflict’ and ‘non conflict issues’ in determining voting behaviour.
        The following is an indicative description of the seminars

        1. Introduction
        2. The Institutional Context: Consocationalism
        3. Social Bases of Voting: Religion versus other effects
        4. Ideological Bases of Voting: Ethno-national ideology versus other ideological effects (economic left-right, liberal-conservative, pro-EU anti EU)
        5. Psychological identification: Positive Affective attachment versus negative identification
        6. Group representation: Tribune versus Catch-All effects
        7. Holding parties responsible for governing performance
        8. Parties from the South and the East: What would happen if...?
        9. Implications for other deeply divided places and consociational contexts

        Note that there will be an element of quantitative statistical analysis in this module. Students should be prepared for this.

        Learning Outcomes

        Understanding of the nature of party competition and electoral choice in Northern Ireland

        Skills

        Intellectual skills
        Understanding theoretical interpretations of political choice and understanding how theories are empiricallly tested


        Professional and career development skills

        Participation in seminars and knowledge of methodological matters

        Organizational skills

        Assignment completion

        Assessment

        Analysis of Data (35%), Essay (55%), Presentation (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3058

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • National and Ethnic Minorities in European Politics
        Overview

        Often trapped between the competing logics of nation and state, minority groups in Europe have played an important role in the twentieth century's bloodiest tragedies and have been targeted in many conflicts. However, contemporary Europe offers a substantial institutional approach to put minority issues on an entirely novel footing. This course looks at the role of minority groups in Europe addressing their competing claims over political representation, economic resources and cultural rights that persist throughout the Union. The course will examine minority issues from a comparative perspective to shed light on challenges that face specifically postcommunist European societies and will address issues pertaining to recognition of minority rights in the ‘older’ EU member states.

        We start with the analyses of the origins of minority rights, the establishment of the European minority rights regime, and the relationship between national minorities and majorities in contemporary Europe. The module will engage with issues on European minority rights agenda moving beyond the perspective of nation-state, and will focus upon the impact of both, social processes domestically and geopolitical considerations regionally to enhance understanding of complicated relationship between the human rights and non-discrimination agendas globally. It engages literature on postcommunist Europeanisation, minority rights regime and accommodation of rights of migrants during the complex path of building European institutions. Taking its starting point in theoretical debates of post-cold War minority protection in Europe, the module is focused empirically on European cases, East and West, where tensions between groups have been identified and examined in terms of ethnic and/or national identities. By contrasting the issue relevant for national minorities throughout Europe the course will allow greater understanding of consequences going in hand with the recognition of national minority rights for European societies with growing numbers of old and new minority communities.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:
        • Place minority situations in a broader context of domestic and European politics
        • Contrast the differential impact European integration had on minority groups in different waves of enlargement
        • Ascertain importance of national minorities as guarantors of geopolitical stability
        • Understand and be able to discriminate the impact of new and old minorities have on likelihood of ethnic conflict in contemporary Europe
        • Communicate clearly and concisely, both orally and in written form contemporary situation in Europe
        • Rigorously pursue intellectual questions in an academic manner, using analytical skills and critical thinking.

        Skills

        This module will assist in developing students’ skills in a number of important areas. These include:

        Intellectual skills
        • Analytical Thinking: identify, understand, interpret and evaluate relevant subject-specific arguments made by others; construct independent arguments
        • Critical & Independent Thinking: ability to think critically and construct one’s own position in relation to existing and ongoing debates in the field
        Professional and career development skills
        • Communication Skills: ability to communicate clearly with others, both orally and in writing
        • Teamwork: ability to work with others in a team, negotiate conflicts and recognize different ways of learning
        • Self-Reflexivity: ability to reflect on one’s own progress and identify and act upon ones own development needs with respect to life-long learning and career development
        Organizational skills
        • Clear organisation of information: show efficiency in the organisation of large amounts of complex information and the ability to identify, describe and analyse the key features of the information
        • Organisation and communication: demonstrate ability to use evidence to develop logical and clear argument; show aptitude for the effective use of information in a direct and appropriate way

        Assessment

        Case Study (35%), Essay (55%), Literature Review (10%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3059

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Challenges to contemporary party politics
        Overview

        This module focuses on two themes: party system change and the contemporary challenges that affect political parties. Why and how do new parties emerge? Why do old parties survive crises and new party challenges? Who joins political parties and how can we explain the decline in party membership? How can parties and their representatives be more representative of society at large? Should parties be funded through our taxes or private money? Do political parties make a difference in terms of public policy? These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this module.
        The module is comparative in nature, with a focus on European and North American countries, but discussions of other cases are welcome.
        Assessment is designed to hone the students’ presentation, writing, critical and knowledge-transfer skills: students make a presentation that is partly assessed through student peer evaluation, write a case-study report and a book review, and write a policy paper in which they advise a (fictional) political party on addressing a contemporary challenge (representation of women and minorities, party finance, or membership).
        Past students on this module have enjoyed the presentations and the advantages of peer assessment (making the presentation to the whole class, more focus on content and making a good presentation, and getting to exercise their critical skills through marking), as well as the relaxed style of the seminars and the ability to write a policy paper instead of an academic essay.

        Learning Outcomes

        Upon successful completion of the module, students will
         acquire knowledge of and engage with major debates within the literature on political parties, their interaction with other parties and their internal organisation;
         be able to identify and discuss the functions and roles played by political parties in modern representative democracies;
         be able to compare contexts of party and party system formation and forms of party organisation;
         be able to identify the challenges political parties currently face;
         use comparative qualitative and quantitative data to support arguments and evaluate relationships between variables/factors that contribute to explaining parties and party systems;
         develop and improve their skills in oral and written communication through seminar activities, presentations, essays and research papers, and feedback provided by the module convenor.

        Skills

        Intellectual skills

        • Managing and prioritizing knowledge: the skill of identifying relevant and subject-specific knowledge, sources and data and to manage such information in an independent manner;
        • Synthesis of information: the skill of collecting, analysing and synthesizing information from a variety of web and library sources via oral debates and written work.
        • Critical and independent thinking: the ability to think critically and to construct one’s own position/argument in relation to leading debates within the field;
        • Comparative analysis: the knowledge and use of relevant data from a range of cases to illustrate support or challenge key arguments and debates and evaluate hypotheses (the relationship between variables or factors) in the literature. Also the ability to select appropriate cases and methodology to answer research questions.

        Professional and career development skills

        • Communication skills: the ability to clearly communicate one’s position both orally and in writing;
        • Presentational and advocacy skills: the ability to present your ideas to a group of peers and sustain a convincing argument;
        • Evaluation skills: the ability to assess your peers’ work in an impartial fashion using a pre-determined set of criteria.

        Organizational skills

        • Preparatory skills: always being well prepared for tutorials (e.g. required reading)
        • Time management: effective use of study time, meeting coursework deadlines
        • Independent research: making good use of the library and the materials available

        Assessment

        - Portfolio: book review and case study report (1,500-2,000 words) 30%
        - Presentation (lecturer-and peer-assessed) 10%
        - Policy paper (2,500-3,000 words) 60%

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3067

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Musics on the Island of Ire
        Overview

        In this module, we will examine a range of musics in Ireland from historical and ethnographic perspectives. We will consider the ways that musicking – the process of engaging in music as performer, composer, facilitator or audience – not only expresses, but enacts and produces identities through practice within particular social environments. In so doing, we will explore a broad range of musical genres, from the Harp to the Lambeg Drum; from “Irish Traditional Music” to “Celtic Soul” and from the Flute Band to Electronic Dance Music. We will consider the kinds of identities that these musics both represent and produce in relation to dimensions of power and inequality including gender, social class, race, ethnicity and nationality. In exploring the social conditioning of taste and the different material and emotional rewards produced by different forms of musicking, we will find opportunities to both critically explore our own tastes, and develop deepened understandings of the tastes of others.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of this module students should:

        be familiar with general theories associated with the anthropology of music and be able to apply them to the Mediterranean region

        be able to recognise and critically assess a variety of music cultures

        understand how performance impacts the construction of sociocultural identities and political circumstances

        be able to critically discuss the role of intercultural exchange and ‘hybridity’ in current music-making

        have written critical texts engaging with central debates in current musical anthropology

        have created audio/visual media intended for the general public

        Skills

        - Academic reading and writing
        - Oral communication of theoretical and ethnographic data
        - Media literacy and criticism
        - Effective presentation of written work
        - Critical reflection on their own cultural assumptions and biases
        - Practical understanding of fieldwork methods including interviewing and participant observation
        - Creative work with electronic audio/visual media.

        Assessment

        Exam: 60%
        Coursework portfolio: 30%
        Continuous Assessment: 10%

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Arms Control
        Overview

        The module will introduce the student to arms control as a part of national security policy and strategy. The focus of the module is mainly on strategic arms control of the 20th Century and early 21st Century. The module focus is on nuclear arms control and the structures of world order. The Nuclear Non Proliferation regime will be the basis for the analysis of the arms limitation and arms reduction treaties of the 1970s to 2000s. The module will thus deal with SALT I, SALT II, with START, New START and the INF Treaty. The MBFR negotiations and CFE treaty will offer a bridge to the wider spectrum of arms control. Humanitarian arms control, biological and chemical arms control regimes and control or prohibition of space based weapons will also feature. The module will offer a classic and a critical introduction into arms control theory.

        Learning Outcomes

        NONE

        Skills

        NONE

        Assessment

        Essay (90%) and presentation (10%).

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3039

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Asylum and Migration in Global Politics
        Overview

        down many routes for asylum seekers, turning attention to security and border control concerns. Bilateral and multi-lateral relations are imbued with concerns about controlling the movement of people as states work with and respond not only to each other, but to non-governmental and international organizations. These dynamics are imbued with global power relations, with changing notions of security and with age-old questions of sovereignty, citizenship, and belonging. The dominant policy direction favours solutions that emphasize either preventative protection or repatriation, both practices of containment and conflict resolution and management. We are witnessing a decline in the traditional category of refugees, but a rise in the number of internally displaced persons. Economic deprivation and poverty continues to pair with conflict to drive migration that muddies the waters between “forced” and “voluntary” categories. Increasing incidents of human smuggling and human trafficking, and a failure in many circles to effectively distinguish between the two, are demanding new policy innovations that are linking international criminal law to diplomatic relations – and migrants are caught in the middle. Finally, emerging categories such as “environmental refugees” are challenging the current refugee regime, which remains rooted in the 1951 Convention.

        This module will examine these changes in the fields of refugee and migration studies, asking questions that assess not only shifting policy and practices but also the impacts these shifts have on the lived lives of migrants themselves. We will engage these questions and the issues they raise through thoughtful and critical dialogue. We will focus on the politics of migration and citizenship as dynamic practices rather than pre-determined institutions, and ask what roles the various structures and frameworks of contemporary International Relations play in these politics. Importantly, we will also ask what role individuals play, and examine the politics of voice and agency in both shaping, contesting and resisting state practices. To tackle these issues, we will engage with both policy and theoretical literatures and illustrate conceptual and philosophical arguments through extensive use of specific case studies from different regions of the world. We will emphasize contemporary and emerging issues, but also look at the historical contexts and questions that shape the politics of migration and citizenship as they exist today.

        Learning Outcomes

        none

        Skills

        none

        Assessment

        none

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3041

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Security and Technology
        Overview

        Security politics has long been associated with the development, use and regulation of new technologies, from the ‘nuclear revolution’ to contemporary practices of cyber-security and surveillance. This module focusses on the inter-relationships of technology and security, and seeks to develop advanced understanding of the complexities of the “technopolitics” of security. This includes both novel technologies and the mundane materialities of security (fences, walls, guns). It introduces students to the role and political significance of science and technology from different theoretical perspectives, from political realism to the contemporary ‘material turn’ in critical security studies. It seeks to engage students in contemporary political debates and practices that entangle science and technology and security politics which may include issues such as cyber-security, UAVs/Drones, disarmament, nuclear terrorism, critical infrastructure protection, technologies of killing, biotechnology, biometrics, surveillance, border control, food security, health and medical technologies, and technologies of (military) bodies, among others. The module incorporates both theoretical perspectives (including IR/Security theory, and wider philosophy of technology and Science, Technology and Society approaches) and in depth empirical material.

        Learning Outcomes

        Upon successful completion of the module students will:

        - Demonstrate an awareness and understanding of different theoretical understandings of science and technology in security politics and practice.
        - Be able to discuss in depth the politics of several key security technologies.
        - Critically engage in debates on key developments in the politics of security that relate to emerging technologies and technologically mediated forms of security practice.
        - Be able to reflect upon the ethical and political implications of technological developments and practices in relation to security.
        - Pursue independent, creative and critical thinking through both written work and group discussions.

        Skills

        Intellectual skills
        • Managing & Prioritizing Knowledge: identify relevant and subject-specific knowledge, sources and data; manage such information in an independent manner
        • Analytical Thinking: identify, understand, interpret and evaluate relevant subject-specific arguments made by others; construct independent arguments
        • Critical & Independent Thinking: ability to think critically and construct one’s own position in relation to existing and ongoing debates in the field

        Professional and career development skills
        • Communication Skills: ability to communicate clearly with others, both orally and in writing
        • Teamwork: ability to work with others in a team, negotiate conflicts and recognize different ways of learning
        • Diversity: ability to acknowledge and be sensitive to the range of cultural differences present in the learning environment
        • Self-Reflexivity: ability to reflect on one’s own progress and identify and act upon ones own development needs with respect to life-long learning and career development
        • Time Management: ability to negotiate diverse and competing pressures; cope with stress; and achieve a work / life balance

        Organizational skills
        • Efficient and effective work practice: demonstrate ability to work efficiently to deadlines
        • Clear organisation of information: show efficiency in the organisation of large amounts of complex information and the ability to identify, describe and analyse the key features of the information
        • Organisation and communication: demonstrate ability to use evidence to develop logical and clear arguments; show aptitude for the effective use of information in a direct and appropriate way
        • Enterprising thinking: Demonstrate ability to think and argue in novel and enterprising ways, to display originality of thought and argument and the ability to clearly support arguments in innovative ways

        Assessment

        35% Essay, 55% Portfolio, 10% Continuous Assessment

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3073

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Placement
        Overview

        This module offers students the opportunity to undertake a work placement for a total of 1.5 days per week for 12 weeks (18 days in total) in a host organisation. Assessment will be via a reflective learning log, policy brief and academic case study. The module offers a hands-on, workplace-based learning opportunity in the participating institutions during which they will contribute to their employer’s work and undertake three pieces of assessed work.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will have significantly developed their administrative knowledge and capacity; acquired a clear understanding of the work, organisation and operation of the host institution; produced a body of work that is both academically sound and, ideally, of practical utility for the host institution; and developed and acquired a range of skills including working within a team setting and complying with the norms and ethical standards of a professional working environment. Students will also have learned to locate their applied experience with academic interests and concerns.

        Skills

        This module will assist in developing students’ skills in a number of important areas. These include:

        Intellectual skills
        • Managing & Prioritizing Knowledge
        • Analytical Thinking
        • Critical & Independent Thinking

        Professional and career development skills
        • Communication Skills
        • Teamwork
        • Diversity
        • Self-Reflexivity
        • Time Management

        Technical and practical skills
        • Information Technology
        • Regulations and standards

        Organizational skills
        • Efficient and effective work practice
        • Clear organisation of information
        • Organisation and communication
        • Enterprising thinking

        Assessment

        Attendance for 18 days total in host workplace organisation (e.g. Civil Service Department, NGO, consultancy firm)
        Submission of all three forms of assessment.
        Case Study (55%), Logbook (10%), Policy Paper (35%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3089

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • In Gods We Trust: The New Anthropology of Religion
        Overview

        Drawing on new scientific advances, this religion course examines foundational questions about the nature of religious belief and practice.

        The course is based on the idea that religion is a naturalistic phenomenon — meaning it can be studied and better understood using the tools of science. Religious belief and practice emerge naturally from the structure of human psychology, and have an important impact on the structure of societies, the way groups relate to each other, and the ability of human beings to cooperate effectively.

        Topics to be covered will include traditional and contemporary theories of religion, with a special emphasis on cultural evolutionary models, as well as how scientific and humanistic scholarship can benefit from mutual engagement.

        The module will have an emphasis on contemporary issues in the study and practice of religion (e.g. new scientific theories of religion, the current debates between atheists and theists, and the role of religion in violent conflicts).

        Learning Outcomes

        Be able to describe and consider the implications of:

        1) Evolutionary and cognitive scientific approaches to the study of religion
        2) The origins of religion, and its role in human life
        3) How religion relates to morality, spirituality and atheism
        4) The role of religion in current events and conflict hotspots around the world
        5) The role religion may have played in the origin of civilization

        Skills

        The module will help foster the students’:

        (1) Ability to consider the findings of multiple disciplines in addressing questions of human thought and behaviour.

        (2) Ability to present ideas clearly in both oral and written formats

        (3) Ability to research and critically analyse material from multiple disciplines

        (4) Ability to debate and defend arguments

        (5) Ability to engage in civil discourse about strongly held convictions

        (6) Ability to prepare concise and focused presentations

        Assessment

        Journal (70%), Presentation (20%), Tutorial Contribution (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        ANT3150

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Anthropology Dissertation
        Overview

        The writing and presentation of a dissertation normally based on first-hand field research.

        Learning Outcomes

        To organise and analyse research data and to be self-reflexive.

        Skills

        Students should develop skills in the following areas:
        - bibliographical research and documentary analysis;
        - organising and retrieving information;
        - writing a long piece of work;
        - time management

        Assessment

        Dissertation submission (100%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        40

        Module Code

        ANT3099

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Remembering the Future: Violent Pasts, Loss and the Politics of Hope
        Overview

        The module will draw on social theory and ethnographic case studies to examine the role of memory in conflict and post-conflict contexts. Most inter-group conflicts involve contestation over competing pasts and losses. Such contestation plays an important role in how and whether societies can move forward, recover from violence, and deal with reparations. Memory therefore is instrumental not only in how the past is mobilized but also how the future is imagined and constructed -as equal or unequal, shared or divided. By looking at relevant concepts such as loss, nostalgia, remembering, forgetting, expectation, and hope, the module will investigate on one hand how memory politics operate in our post-truth era and in phenomena of nationalism, populism, racism, and exclusion. On the other hand, we will look at how social movements, groups, and communities use memory across the world to build sustainable and inclusive futures.
        Topics covered in the module will include: The politics of memory and forgetting: ‘Official’ Histories and ‘Voices from the Edge’; Transnational Narratives of Violence and Justice; Nostalgia, Competing Losses, and the Rise of Populism on both sides of the Atlantic; Displacement as Space and Time; On ‘Speaking Out’: Truth Recovery, Transitional Justice and Human Rights; Social Movements, Alternative Futures, and the Politics of Hope.
        This is a Faculty-funded international module, bringing together staff and students in HAPP at QUB and in Liberal Arts at Grinnell College to study these issues in ethnographically diverse contexts, including the rise of white supremacy in the US, post-Brexit UK and xenophobia, migrant solidarity movements and environmental protest.
        Students will get separate lectures on the weekly topics, but will connect virtually for selected sessions, which will facilitate inter-group discussions and exchanges. The teaching staff will give at least one virtual lecture for both classes and, if possible, spend a week each in the partner institution engaging students and delivering lectures.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of this module, students will:
        • be familiar with social theory on memory, violence, loss, and futuricity.
        • be able to describe and critically engage with ethnographic examples from across the world in relation to these themes.
        • understand the role of memory in the construction and mobilization of contested pasts and futures.
        • be able to explain some current debates on the role of nostalgia, longing, loss and hope in the construction of collective identities, contestation, and social justice agendas.

        Skills

        By the end of the module, students should have developed the following key skills:

        Generic
        • Effective presentation of written work at a level appropriate to the year of studies.
        • Competency in presenting orally findings from readings and primary research.
        • The ability to research both independently and as part of groups.

        Module-Specific
        • produce written work engaging critically with academic and popular debates on the issues of violence and memory.
        • have demonstrated presentational skills both in online and offline learning environments, and learnt how to address different audiences .
        • be able to employ fieldwork skills in working in memory sites locally
        • have written public engagement pieces for the module’s blog.
        • have access to new diverse groups of students in an international context and experience in collaborating within an international learning environment.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        ANT3152

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Party Politics in the 21st Century
        Overview

        Political parties define how we see and understand politics. Schattschneider (1942) wrote that ‘democracy is unthinkable save in terms of parties’. But does this remain the case? Political parties are central actors, mediating voter’s preferences and policy outcomes. At the same time, many parties in Western democracies have experienced partisan dealignment, declining membership, and increased competition from protest and populist actors. This module aims to explore the challenges facing political parties in the twenty-first century. How has the political party evolved? Has the role of political parties been diminished and if so, what might fill this gap? Have parties been supplanted by personalities? How do parties respond to the media/the social media aga? Topics may vary from year to year, allowing flexibility to capture key events and elections, but may include: the personalisation of party politics; parties in the age of climate emergency; populism and nationalism; social media and the party. The course emphasises both theory and practice, with a weekly qualitative analysis exercise relevant to the week’s topic.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of this module students will;

        Have a critical understanding of party politics and the role parties play in contemporary political life.
        Be able to identify and critically assess the key theories of party politics.
        Have demonstrated their understanding of one or more political parties through oral and written contributions.
        Have strengthened their first-hand experience in carrying out qualitative research through seminar exercises and assessments.

        Skills

        On completion of this module students will;

        Have a critical understanding of party politics and the role parties play in contemporary political life.
        Be able to identify and critically assess the key theories of party politics.
        Have demonstrated their understanding of one or more political parties through oral and written contributions.
        Have strengthened their first-hand experience in carrying out qualitative research through seminar exercises and assessments.

        Assessment

        Coursework/Portfolio: 45%
        Coursework/Portfolio: 45%

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3102

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Anthropology and Roma
        Overview

        The aim of this course is to offer students a comprehensive introduction to key themes and issues emerging from the anthropological study of Roma, Gypsies and Traveller communities. We will start by critically examining some of the main ideas through which Roma communities have been imagined and represented in popular discourse and academia. We will do this by engaging with key anthropological studies of Roma, highlighting the connection between the study of Roma and central anthropological themes: such as kinship, exchange, personhood and cosmology. We will then look at what happens when broader processes of globalisation and Europeanisation take place, with a focus placed on migration and political mobilisation. Finally, we will engage with new approaches to the anthropological study of Roma, with a focus placed on the analysis of representation, misrepresentation and collaboration between anthropologists and Roma communities. Some of the key themes the course will explore are: cosmology and personhood, marginality and identity, migration and borders, politicisation of Roma issues and religious mobilisation, hybridity and collaboration.

        Learning Outcomes

        The main objectives of this course are to:

        * Enable students to familiarise themselves with ethnographic studies of Roma communities * Enable students to engage with some of the main anthropological themes in the study of Roma and other minority groups * Help students draw on different ethnographically informed studies in order to critically challenge homogenising representations * Use ethnographic studies on Roma in order to engage with anthropological theory and debates in the discipline * Consolidate students’ knowledge of anthropological methodology with a focus on minority groups * Familiarise students with the socio-political changes brought about by the process of Europeanisation in relation to minority groups in Europe * Enable students’ comparative analysis of anthropological themes in relation to marginalised communities * Develop basic conceptual tools for approaching the subject and analysis of the assigned texts

        Skills

        Transferable skills: * Ability to critically engage with ethnographic texts * Develop basic conceptual tools for approaching the subject and analysis of the assigned texts * Develop presentation skills * Ability to research critically and analyse material from multiple disciplines * Ability to debate and construct arguments * Ability to present ideas clearly in both oral and written formats

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        ANT3153

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

  • Entry Requirements

    Entrance requirements

    A level requirements
    ABB

    A maximum of one BTEC/OCR Single Award or AQA Extended Certificate will be accepted as part of an applicant's portfolio of qualifications with a Distinction* being equated to grade A at A-Level and a Distinction being equated to a grade B at A-level.
    Irish leaving certificate requirements
    H3H3H3H3H3H3/H2H3H3H3H3
    Access Course
    Successful completion of Access Course with an average of 70%.
    International Baccalaureate Diploma
    33 points overall, including 6,5,5 at Higher Level
    BTEC Level 3 Extended/National Extended Diploma
    QCF BTEC Extended Diploma (180 credits at Level 3) with overall grades D*DD

    RQF BTEC National Extended Diploma (1080 GLH at Level 3) with overall grades D*DD
    Graduate
    A minimum of a 2:2 Honours Degree
    All applicants
    There are no specific subject requirements to study Anthropology and History

    Selection Criteria

    In addition, to the entrance requirements above, it is essential that you read our guidance below on 'How we choose our students' prior to submitting your UCAS application.

    Applications are dealt with centrally by the Admissions and Access Service rather than by individual University Schools. Once your on-line form has been processed by UCAS and forwarded to Queen's, an acknowledgement is normally sent within two weeks of its receipt at the University.

    Selection is on the basis of the information provided on your UCAS form. Decisions are made on an ongoing basis and will be notified to you via UCAS.

    For entry last year, applicants for this degree offering A-Level/ BTEC Level 3 qualifications or equivalent must have had, or been able to achieve, a minimum of 5 GCSE passes at grade C/4 or better (to include English Language). The Selector will check that any specific entry requirements in terms of GCSE and/or A-level subjects can be fulfilled.

    Offers are normally made on the basis of 3 A-levels. Two subjects at A-level plus two at AS would also be considered. The offer for repeat applicants is set in terms of 3 A-levels and may be one grade higher than that asked from first time applicants. Grades may be held from the previous year.

    Applicants offering two A-levels and one BTEC Subsidiary Diploma/National Extended Certificate (or equivalent qualification), or one A-level and a BTEC Diploma/National Diploma (or equivalent qualification) will also be considered. Offers will be made in terms of the overall BTEC grade(s) awarded. Please note that a maximum of one BTEC Subsidiary Diploma/National Extended Certificate (or equivalent) will be counted as part of an applicant’s portfolio of qualifications. The normal GCSE profile will be expected.

    For applicants offering Irish Leaving Certificate, please note that performance at Irish Junior Certificate is taken into account. Applicants must have a minimum of 5 IJC grades C/ Merit. The Selector also checks that any specific entry requirements in terms of Leaving Certificate subjects can be satisfied.

    For applicants offering a HNC, the current requirements are successful completion of the HNC with 2 Distinctions and remainder Merits. For those offering a Higher National Diploma, some flexibility may be allowed in terms of GCSE profile but, to be eligible for an offer, the grades obtained in the first year of the HND must allow the overall offer to be achievable. The current entrance requirements are successful completion of the HND with 2 Distinctions, 10 Merits and 4 Passes overall. Any consideration would be for Stage 1 entry only.

    The information provided in the personal statement section and the academic reference together with predicted grades are noted but, in the case of BA degrees, these are not the final deciding factors in whether or not a conditional offer can be made. However, they may be reconsidered in a tie break situation in August.

    A-level General Studies and A-level Critical Thinking would not normally be considered as part of a three A-level offer and, although they may be excluded where an applicant is taking 4 A-level subjects, the grade achieved could be taken into account if necessary in August/September.

    Applicants are not normally asked to attend for interview, though there are some exceptions and specific information is provided with the relevant subject areas.

    If you are made an offer then you may be invited to a Faculty/School Open Day, which is usually held in the second semester. This will allow you the opportunity to visit the University and to find out more about the degree programme of your choice and the facilities on offer. It also gives you a flavour of the academic and social life at Queen's.

    If you cannot find the information you need here, please contact the University Admissions Service (admissions@qub.ac.uk), giving full details of your qualifications and educational background.

    International Students

    Our country/region pages include information on entry requirements, tuition fees, scholarships, student profiles, upcoming events and contacts for your country/region. Use the dropdown list below for specific information for your country/region.

    English Language Requirements

    An IELTS score of 6.5 with a minimum of 5.5 in each test component or an equivalent acceptable qualification, details of which are available at: go.qub.ac.uk/EnglishLanguageReqs

    If you need to improve your English language skills before you enter this degree programme, INTO Queen's University Belfast offers a range of English language courses. These intensive and flexible courses are designed to improve your English ability for admission to this degree.

    • Academic English: an intensive English language and study skills course for successful university study at degree level
    • Pre-sessional English: a short intensive academic English course for students starting a degree programme at Queen's University Belfast and who need to improve their English.

    International Students - Foundation and International Year One Programmes

    INTO Queen's offers a range of academic and English language programmes to help prepare international students for undergraduate study at Queen's University. You will learn from experienced teachers in a dedicated international study centre on campus, and will have full access to the University's world-class facilities.

    These programmes are designed for international students who do not meet the required academic and English language requirements for direct entry.

    INTO - English Language Course(QSIS ELEMENT IS EMPTY)

    NEXT
    Careers

  • Careers

    Career Prospects

    Introduction
    Studying for an Anthropology and International Relations degree at Queen’s will assist you in developing the core skills and employment-related experiences that are increasingly valued by employers, professional organisations and academic institutions.

    Employment after the Course
    Career pathways typically lead to employment in:
    • User Experience
    • Consultancy
    • Civil Service
    • Development, NGO work, International Policy, Public Sector
    • Journalism, Human Rights, Conflict Resolution, Community Work
    • Arts Administration, Creative Industries, Media, Performance, Heritage, Museums, Tourism
    • Market Research
    • Public and Private Sector related to: Religious Negotiation, Multiculturalism/Diversity
    • Teaching in schools
    • Academic Teaching and Research
    • Human Rights, Conflict Resolution, Community Work, Journalism

    Employment Links
    A growing number of Internship opportunities will match dissertation students with organisations and institutions relevant to their career paths by building on local and international staff networks and professional connections. Current placement partners include
    • Operation Wallacea, which works with teams of ecologists, scientists and academics on a variety of bio-geographical projects around the globe
    • Belfast Migration Centre offers students of the module ‘Migration, Displacement and Diasporas’ internship opportunities in their ‘Belonging Project’
    • Department of the Northern Ireland Executive
    • The Equality Commission of Northern Ireland
    • Public affairs consultancies
    • Charities such as Women’s Aid

    We regularly consult and develop links with a large number of employers, including NI government departments and the North/South Ministerial Council, who provide sponsorship for our internships.

    A growing number of Internship opportunities will match dissertation students with organisations and institutions relevant to their career paths by building on local and international staff networks and professional connections.

    Professional Opportunities
    International Travel
    As part of undergraduate training, students have the opportunity to use practice-based research skills during eight weeks of ethnographic fieldwork in areas of their specialisation, which can entail working with organisations around the globe.

    Additional Awards Gained

    Students have the option to take the Social Anthropology dissertation module. This will involve undertaking fieldwork in the summer vacation period between years 2 and 3. The cost will vary depending on the location of the fieldwork, ranging from £100-£500. The School will provide financial support up to a maximum of £300.

    Prizes and Awards(QSIS ELEMENT IS EMPTY)

    Degree plus award for extra-curricular skills

    In addition to your degree programme, at Queen's you can have the opportunity to gain wider life, academic and employability skills. For example, placements, voluntary work, clubs, societies, sports and lots more. So not only do you graduate with a degree recognised from a world leading university, you'll have practical national and international experience plus a wider exposure to life overall. We call this Degree Plus. It's what makes studying at Queen's University Belfast special.

  • Fees and Funding

    Tuition Fees

    Northern Ireland (NI) 1 £4,630
    Republic of Ireland (ROI) 2 £4,630
    England, Scotland or Wales (GB) 1 £9,250
    EU Other 3 £18,800
    International £18,800

    1 EU citizens in the EU Settlement Scheme, with settled status, will be charged the NI or GB tuition fee based on where they are ordinarily resident. Students who are ROI nationals resident in GB will be charged the GB fee.

    2 EU students who are ROI nationals resident in ROI are eligible for NI tuition fees.

    3 EU Other students (excludes Republic of Ireland nationals living in GB, NI or ROI) are charged tuition fees in line with international fees.

    All tuition fees quoted relate to a single year of study unless stated otherwise. The NI and ROI fees relate to academic year 2022-23 and will be updated to 2023-24 rates once they have been confirmed. All fees will be subject to an annual inflationary increase, unless explicitly stated otherwise.

    NI, GB and ROI fees for 2022 entry will be published soon. International fees for 2022 entry can be viewed here: www.qub.ac.uk/International/International-students/International-tuition-fees

    Tuition fee rates are calculated based on a student’s tuition fee status and generally increase annually by inflation. How tuition fees are determined is set out in the Student Finance Framework.

    Additional course costs

    All Students

    Depending on the programme of study, there may be extra costs which are not covered by tuition fees, which students will need to consider when planning their studies.

    Students can borrow books and access online learning resources from any Queen's library.

    If students wish to purchase recommended texts, rather than borrow them from the University Library, prices per text can range from £30 to £100. A programme may have up to 6 modules per year, each with a recommended text.  

    Students should also budget between £30 to £75 per year for photocopying, memory sticks and printing charges.  

    Students undertaking a period of work placement or study abroad, as either a compulsory or optional part of their programme, should be aware that they will have to fund additional travel and living costs.

    If a final year includes a major project or dissertation, there may be costs associated with transport, accommodation and/or materials. The amount will depend on the project chosen. There may also be additional costs for printing and binding.

    Students may wish to consider purchasing an electronic device; costs will vary depending on the specification of the model chosen.

    There are also additional charges for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines.

    Anthropology and International Relations costs

    Students have the option to take the Social Anthropology dissertation module. This will involve undertaking fieldwork in the summer vacation period between years 2 and 3. The cost will vary depending on the location of the fieldwork, ranging from £100-£500. The School will provide financial support up to a maximum of £300.

    How do I fund my study?

    There are different tuition fee and student financial support arrangements for students from Northern Ireland, those from England, Scotland and Wales (Great Britain), and those from the rest of the European Union.

    Information on funding options and financial assistance for undergraduate students is available at www.qub.ac.uk/Study/Undergraduate/Fees-and-scholarships/.

    Scholarships

    Each year, we offer a range of scholarships and prizes for new students. Information on scholarships available.

    International Scholarships

    Information on scholarships for international students, is available at www.qub.ac.uk/International/International-students/International-scholarships/.

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  • Apply

    How and when to Apply

    How to Apply

    Application for admission to full-time undergraduate and sandwich courses at the University should normally be made through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS). Full information can be obtained from the UCAS website at: www.ucas.com/students.

    When to Apply

    UCAS will start processing applications for entry in autumn 2023 from 1 September 2022.

    Advisory closing date: 25 January 2023 (18:00). This is the 'equal consideration' deadline for this course.

    Applications from UK and EU (Republic of Ireland) students after this date are, in practice, considered by Queen’s for entry to this course throughout the remainder of the application cycle (30 June 2023) subject to the availability of places.

    Applications from International and EU (Other) students are normally considered by Queen’s for entry to this course until 30 June 2023. If you apply for 2023 entry after this deadline, you will automatically be entered into Clearing.

    Applicants are encouraged to apply as early as is consistent with having made a careful and considered choice of institutions and courses.

    The Institution code name for Queen's is QBELF and the institution code is Q75.

    Further information on applying to study at Queen's is available at: www.qub.ac.uk/Study/Undergraduate/How-to-apply/

    Apply via UCAS

    Terms and Conditions

    The terms and conditions that apply when you accept an offer of a place at the University on a taught programme of study. Queen's University Belfast Terms and Conditions.

    Additional Information for International (non-EU) Students

    1. Applying through UCAS
      Most students make their applications through UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service) for full-time undergraduate degree programmes at Queen's. The UCAS application deadline for international students is 30 June 2023.
    2. Applying direct
      The Direct Entry Application form is to be used by international applicants who wish to apply directly, and only, to Queen's or who have been asked to provide information in advance of submitting a formal UCAS application. Find out more.
    3. Applying through agents and partners
      The University’s in-country representatives can assist you to submit a UCAS application or a direct application. Please consult the Agent List to find an agent in your country who will help you with your application to Queen’s University.

    Download a prospectus

    Keywords

    INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

    PEACE-MAKING

    RELIGION

    SOCIETY

    ANTHROPOLOGY

    ART

    CONFLICT

    CONTEMPORARY POLITICS

    CULTURE

    DIPLOMACY

    ETHNOMUSICOLOGY

    HUMAN DIVERSITY

    IDENTITY

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Course Vacancy Status

Below is the current vacancy status for this course. For further information please contact us.

Student Type
Places available?
NI and RoI Students
GB Students
International and EU (not RoI) Students