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History and International Relations (BA HONS) LV21

BA|Undergraduate

History and International Relations

Entry year
Academic Year 2023/24
Entry requirements
ABB
Duration
3 years (Full Time)
UCAS code
LV21
  • Overview

    The Joint Honours Programme in History and International Relations provides students with an intellectual training in disciplines that are complementary and mutually enriching. The programme enables students to appreciate how historical events shape modern politics and how such themes are to be understood and explained through insights into political analysis (eg political theory, political institutions, international relations). It offers students the opportunity to analyse country-based developments across the globe and pays specific attention to the histories and politics of Africa, Europe and the America.

    History and International Relations Degree highlights

    History at Queen’s is ranked in the top 200 as per the QS World University Rankings 2021.

    Global Opportunities

    • This programme offers students opportunities to travel and study at universities in Europe and North America. Short-term (two weeks) and longer-term (up to one academic year) exchanges are on offer.

      Possible examples include:
      • George Washington University (Washington DC, USA)
      • Aarhus Universitet (Denmark)
      • College of Charleston (South Carolina, USA)
      • Institut d’Etudes Politques de Bordeaux (France)
      • University of Oslo (Norway)
      • Universiteit Utrecht (Netherlands)
      • Vanderbilt University (Nashville, Tennessee, USA)

      Field trips may also be offered in particular years or as part of certain modules.
    • The School also has links with Queen’s University’s Global Research Centre, The Senator George J. Mitchell Institute for Global Peace, Security and Justice. Many of the School’s staff are Fellows in the Mitchell Institute, where they work in collaboration with experts in peace and conflict studies from other disciplines such as law, sociology, and the creative arts.

    Industry Links

    • The School offers a range of employment placements where students can gain real world work experience which is invaluable in terms of employment after graduation. Given that Belfast is a regional capital with devolved powers, we can offer students placements in the high profile political and related institutions on our doorstep - for example in the Department of Justice, Equality Commission, Police Ombudsman’s Office, or BBC Northern Ireland.
    • The internship scheme at Queen's University involves work placements with a range of government agencies and political parties at Stormont, as well as the Police Ombudsman, the BBC and local non-governmental agencies and consultancies. Students spend three days a week seconded to an organization, providing them with vital work experience and exposure to the world of policy-making.

    Career Development

    • Understanding the present and anticipating the future requires the ability to study and interpret the past as a means to understanding the present. This programme enables students to appreciate how historical events shape modern issues and how such themes are to be understood and explained through insights into political analysis (e.g. political theory, political institutions, international relations).

    Internationally Renowned Experts

    • With over 30 staff at the cutting edge of research and publication, the Politics and IR at Queen’s is the largest in Ireland and one of the largest in the UK and Ireland, with specialisms in Irish and British politics, political theory, sustainable development, the politics of film and literature, gender, democratic innovations, European Union politics, ethnic conflict, and international relations.
    • Professor David Phinnemore is an expert on EU Treaty reform and EU enlargement, which led to his secondment as an advisor to the UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office.
      Dr Alex Titov publishes widely, both academically and in popular media, on various aspects of Russian history, politics and foreign policy. One of his research fields has been Russian foreign policy since the collapse of the USSR. His work has appeared in the Irish Times, The Independent (London), The Conversation, BBC History Magazine, and many others.
    • We offer a wide-ranging history curriculum, that attends to historical phenomena like racism traditionally neglected by British and Irish universities.
    • The School of History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics at Queen‘s has 30 full-time academics, making it the largest institutional centre for the study of these subjects in Ireland and one of the largest in the UK.

      The School also boasts the following:
      • Centre for Public History
      • Institute of Cognition and Culture
      • Institute of Irish Studies
      • Two International Summer Schools (the Irish
      Studies Summer School; and the Conflict
      Transformation and Social Justice Summer
      School)

    Student Experience

    “When I came to visit Queen‘s, the facilities, the city and the feel of the place were far above any of the other universities I‘d visited. I chose this particular course as it looked interesting, and covered a variety of topics. Belfast itself is a lovely city, with an amazing river walk. I‘ve loved trips to the coast and to the mountains and it really is a beautiful place to live.”
    Naomi Armstrong
  • Course content

    Course Structure

    Course ContentHistory explains the world around us. What is gender, race, class, religion, the state, empire, capitalism? What is the USA, China, the United Kingdom, Ireland? What is NATO and the EU? Our historians explain the modern world by reaching back to the Roman empire, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Reformation and the great modern revolutions across all of Europe, North America, Africa, and Asia. From their first year, we trust our students to make choices and range widely across all these histories to understand where we have come from. And from the beginning of your degree you will be taught in small groups by expert historians. Our range in time and space, our trust in you to explore and make good choices, and our small group teaching from the first year of the degree, mark us out among our peer universities.

    The International Relations modules will provide you with a solid grounding in international relations, conflict studies, and comparative politics. They will provide you with the analytical tools to analyse contemporary international and national politics and issues.
    Stage 1HISTORY
    Stage 1
    Modules at Level 1 offer a systematic introduction to the discipline of History, partly by sampling some of the many different approaches that historians take in studying the past, and partly by an exploration of some of the major questions of theory and method with which they are concerned.

    Core Modules
    • Exploring History 1
    • Exploring History 2

    INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
    Stage1
    Students are introduced to the study of politics, political ideology, comparative politics, the state of world politics, international history and contemporary Europe.
    Stage 2History modules at stage 2 are generally survey modules seeking to convey a sense of the principal events, trends and developments in a particular country or region over a fairly long time span.
    Examples include:
    • Apocalypse! The History and Anthropology of the End of the World
    • Politics and Society in 20th-Century Ireland
    • The American South 1865–1980
    • The Expansion of Medieval Europe 1000–1300
    • • Uniting Kingdoms: Britain and Ireland, 1603-1815
    • Nationalism and Liberation in Africa
    • Politics and Society in 20th Century Ireland

    International Relations will have to take the core module (International Relations) and then choose over two IR modules among the following list:
    • Deeply Divided Societies
    • Modern Political Thought
    • Northern Ireland Conflict and Paths to Peace
    • International Organisations
    • American Politics
    • British Politics in crisis?
    • Irish Politics
    • Identity Politics in Diverse Societies
    • Politics and Policies of the EU
    • Security and Terrorism
    • Peace and Conflict Studies

    • Studying Politics (research methods)
    Stage 3HISTORY
    Taught modules at Level 3 are more specialised, offering the opportunity to study a short period or a particular theme or problem in detail, working from documents as well as secondary sources.

    Students can also do a dissertation in either History or International Relations and/or take a work-experience module. Module options include:
    • The Second World War in Europe
    • The Peasants Revolt, 1381
    • The Long Sexual Revolution in Western Europe
    • The Soviet Union, 1921 – 1991
    • The Ancient City
    • That Vast Catastrophe: The Irish Famine
    • Thatcher’s Britain
    • Kings, courts and culture in Carolingian Europe
    • The Rise of Christianity
    • Popular Culture in England – 1500 – 1700
    • The Origins of Protestantism
    • Evangelical Protestantism in Ulster
    • The American Civil War and Reconstruction

    In addition, Joint Honours students at Level 3 may choose to complete a dissertation based on an individually assigned research topic chosen in consultation with a supervisor. Some modules, especially surveys, use lectures and tutorials; others are taught through seminars, in which students are expected to come prepared to fully engage in and sometimes lead group discussions. There is also increasing use of web based learning.

    INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
    In the final year, students can select more specific areas and specialist-based modules on, for example, immigration, the Far Right, political extremism, politics of the global economy, and modules on identity politics, international ethics, war and visual culture, conflict and conflict resolution.

    • Arms Control
    • Asylum and Migration in Global Politics
    • Contemporary Political Philosophy
    • Global Political Economy of Energy
    • Politics of the Global Economy
    • European Cultural Identities
    • National and Ethnic Minorities in European Politics
    • Northern Ireland: A Case Study
    • Political Parties and Elections in Northern Ireland
    • Challenges to Contemporary Party Politics
    • Politics, Public Administration and Policymaking
    • Security and Technology
    • The Far Right in Western Europe and North America
    • The Politics of Irish Literature
    • Earth, Energy, Ethics and Economy
    • Radical Hope: Inspiring Present-day Sustainability Transformations

    Dissertation
    In their final year, students can opt to write a dissertation based on a research topic of their choice and under one-to-one supervision by an academic with specialist knowledge in the chosen field.

    Note that this is not an exclusive list and these options are subject to staff availability.

    People teaching you

    Dr Cillian McBride, International Relations


    School Office: +44(0)28 9097 5028 Email: happ@qub.ac.uk

    Dr Ian Campbell, History


    School Office: +44(0)28 9097 5028 Email: happ@qub.ac.uk

    Contact Teaching Times

    Large Group Teaching6 (hours maximum)
    In a typical week you may have up to 6 hours of lectures, depending on the level of study
    Medium Group Teaching9 (hours maximum)
    In a typical week, you may have up to 9 hours of practical classes, workshops or seminars, depending on the level of study.
    Personal Study30 (hours maximum)
    Typically 30 hours per module (30 hours per week), revising in your own time
    Small Group Teaching/Personal Tutorial6 (hours maximum)
    In a typical week, you will have 3-6 hours of tutorials (or later, project supervision).

    Learning and Teaching

    Examples of opportunities for learning provided on this course are as follows:

    • Dissertations
      In their final year, students can write a dissertation based on a research topic of their choice and under one-to-one supervision by an academic with specialist knowledge in the chosen field. This provides a unique opportunity for students to marshal all the research and writing skills they have learned through the course of their degree to produce an original piece of research which reflects the particular interests that they have acquired in their time studying at Queen’s.
    • E-Learning technologies
      Information associated with lectures and assignments is often communicated via a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). Many of the course readings are supplied via Queen’s Online, and e-learning experiences are also embedded in the degree programme through the use of, for example, interactive support materials, podcasts and web-based learning activities.
    • Lectures
      These introduce foundation information about new topics as a starting point for further self-directed private study/reading. As the module progresses this information becomes more complex. Lectures, which are normally delivered in large groups to all year-group peers, also provide opportunities to ask questions and seek clarification on key issues as well as gain feedback and advice on assessments.
    • Self-directed study
      This is an essential part of life as a Queen’s student when important private reading, engagement with e-learning resources, reflection on feedback to date and assignment research and preparation work is carried out.
    • Seminars/tutorials
      A significant amount of teaching is carried out in small groups (typically 8-15 students). These sessions are designed to explore, in more depth, the information that has been presented in the lectures, and reading material that has been set for the course. These sessions provide students with the opportunity to engage closely with academic staff who have specialist knowledge of the topic, to ask questions of them and to assess their own progress and understanding with the support of their peers. During these classes on some courses, students will be expected to present their work to academic staff and their peers.

    Assessment

    A variety of assessment methods are used, depending on the learning objectives of each module.

    • Coursework essays
    • Written examinations
    • Oral presentations
    • Weekly assignments
    • Learning logs
    • Group projects
    • Dissertations

    Feedback

    As students progress through their course at Queen’s they will receive general and specific feedback about their work from a variety of sources including lecturers, module co-ordinators, placement supervisors, personal tutors, advisers of study and peers. University students are expected to engage with reflective practice and to use this approach to improve the quality of their work. Feedback may be provided in a variety of forms including:

    • Feedback provided via formal written comments and marks relating to work that you, as an individual or as part of a group, have submitted.
    • Face to face comment. This may include occasions when you make use of the lecturers’ advertised “office hours” to help you to address a specific query.
    • Placement employer comments or references.
    • Online or emailed comment.
    • General comments or question and answer opportunities at the end of a lecture, or during a seminar or tutorial.
    • Pre-submission advice regarding the standards you should aim for and common pitfalls to avoid. In some instances, this may be provided in the form of model answers or exemplars which you can review in your own time.
    • Comment and guidance provided by staff from specialist support services such as, Careers, Employability and Skills or the Learning Development Service.
    • Once you have reviewed your feedback, you will be encouraged to identify and implement further improvements to the quality of your work.

    PREV
    Overview

  • Modules

    Modules

    The information below is intended as an example only, featuring module details for the current year of study. Modules are reviewed on an annual basis and may be subject to future changes – revised details will be published through Programme Specifications ahead of each academic year.

    • Year 1
      • Exploring History 1
        Overview

        This module allows students to study a closely-defined area of history. They will choose from a range of courses offered by History staff and will study one topic in detail. Each course is designed as a significant area of study in its own right, and as a means of developing in depth some of the issues of historiography and method that students will encounter over their course of studies in History at Queen's. Particular emphasis is placed on essay writing at university level.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of this module, students should be aware of the range of approaches that have been used to study the past. They should be able to demonstrate knowledge of a particular historical case study and how it has been debated amongst historians. They should also be aware of the links between historical research and methodological/theoretical frameworks.

        Skills

        Ability to think critically, reason logically, and evaluate evidence; develop communication skills, both written and oral; an ability to work independently; the ability to use and interpret a range of sources.

        Assessment

        90% Portfolio, comprising:
        • 30% Bibliography and Referencing Exercise
        • 30% Article review
        • 30% Summative assessment (verbal skills, incl. presentation or oral exam)
        10% Tutorial participation

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS1003

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Comparative Politics
        Overview

        The purpose of this course is to explore key themes in British and Irish Politcs in a comparative perspective. The aim is to enable students to understand current politics by comparing Britain, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland to each other and also to other developed democracies. The course opens with two lectures that lay out the ideas behind comparison as a tool of understanding. Subsequent topics include: party systems, electoral systems, government formation, inter-party competition, intra-party competition and devolution.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students should be able to identify what the fundamental differences are between Britain and Ireland in terms of how political life is organised and how citizens think and act politically. Students should also become familiar with the fundamental elements that are shared by the two islands. Students should gain an understanding of what it is about the politics of Britain and Ireland that is unique in a comparative European context. They should also gain insight into the elements of political life on these islands that is common across our European neighbours.

        Skills

        Students will be taught how to identify fundamental political factors and processes rather than the surface details of everyday political life. They will be taught to compare rather than simply describe. In class they will be taught how to discuss the politics of a country - whether that be Northern Ireland, Britain or the Republic of Ireland - in a comparative context and so speak of fundamental differences and similarities rather than a lot of country specific nuance and detail. In their assignments they will be taught how to write and argue about Britain and Ireland using comparison rather than description as their major analytic tool.

        Assessment

        Essay (55%), Presentation (10%), Portfolio (35%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI1009

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Exploring History 2
        Overview

        This module allows students the chance to enrich their understanding of historical methods, theories and themes via a closely defined case study. Students will choose from a range of course offered by History staff and will study one topic in detail. Each course is designed as a significant area of study in its own right, and as a means of developing in depth some of the issues of historiography and method that students will encounter over their course of studies in History at Queen's.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of this module, students should be aware of the range of approaches that have been used to study the past. They should be able to demonstrate knowledge of a particular historical case study and how it has been debated amongst historians. They should also be aware of the links between historical research and methodological/theoretical frameworks.

        Skills

        Ability to think critically, reason logically, and evaluate evidence; develop communication skills, both written and oral; an ability to work independently; the ability to use and interpret a range of sources.

        Assessment

        • 60% Essay
        • 30% Essay
        • 10% Tutorial participation

        Coursework

        30%

        Written

        60%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS1002

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • World Politics
        Overview

        The module examines the development of the international system and raises questions about how and whether this system is changing in light of processes of globalisation. International relations theories of realism, idealism and critical approaches will be introduced, as well as issues of war and conflict, global inequality, poverty, climate change, race and gender.

        Learning Outcomes

        To provide an introduction to two important sub-disciplines of Politics, International Relations and Comparative Politics, while enlarging students' knowledge of current affairs.

        Skills

        To enable students to follow world affairs intelligently and to appreciate the historical background to contemporary developments, as well as how current conflicts are related to structures of political and economic power in the world.

        Assessment

        Students must submit: Research Essay (55%), Portfolio (35%), Tutorial Journal (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI1006

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Revolutions
        Overview

        The aim of the module is to introduce level 1 students to the concept and the scholarly debates that surround the term revolution. It does so by examining four examples of revolutions, which may include the Consumer Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the French Revolution, and the Revolution of the 1960s. By doing so, it will raise broader questions about what causes historical change, the interplay between long-term trends and short-term turning points, and the role of individuals. The module will also introduce students to the importance of small group teaching at university and the importance of individual contribution to tutorials. This will be done through an individual presentation, a structured response to presentations from other students, and a short student reflection on the theory and practice of small-group teaching.

        Learning Outcomes

        An understanding of the concept and the scholarly debates that surround the term revolution; An ability to engage with the most important historiographical debates relating to the subject-matter of the module; Effective presentation and oral communication skills; The ability to contribute effectively and courteously to class debates and discussions; An ability to write an informed analysis of historical problems discussed in the module; Enhanced ability to think critically, reason logically, and evaluate evidence; An ability to reflect on learning experience.

        Skills

        None.

        Assessment

        60% presentation and response, 30% oral exam, 10% tutorial participation.

        Coursework

        60%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        40%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS1004

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Issues in Contemporary Politics
        Overview

        To expose students to contemporary/recent and developing political issues locally, nationally and globally. The module will change year-to-year depending on these issues and staff availability. Typically each topic/issue will be taught in 3-week blocs and each bloc either team taught or given by the same colleague.

        Indicative list of issues (not exhaustive)
        Political Economy - trade, finance, energy, resources, politics of austerity
        War/conflict/geopolitics - current crisis in Syria, ISIS, Ukraine-Russia-EU, Israel-Palestine
        Environment/Sustainability - climate change, climate justice, biodiversity loss,
        Political Parties and Policy-making - rise of Jeremy Corbyn, Bernie Sanders, reform of party finances, decentralisation of policy-making, innovations such as participative budgeting from around the world;
        Gender, women and politics – Hilary Clinton as US President/candidate, strategies for increasing women’s representation (including quotas), the women’s movement and politics
        Social movements and political ideas – Occupy movement, religion and politics, relevance of debates on long-standing normative political ideas – social justice, democracy, recogniton etc. to these issues; role of trades unions, workplace democracy, workers rights etc.
        Migration and refugees – normative, empirical and political-policy explanations of and responses to flows of people across borders, current Syrian one for example, but also other case studies
        Leadership and citizenship- examples of political leadership and citizenship in formal electoral politics and civil society from around the world

        Learning Outcomes

        Knowledge of long-standing or emerging contemporary international political issues

        To be able to connect conceptual-normative ideas about politics to these contemporary issues

        To be above to connect the issues, themes, ideas of this module to other Level 1 PISP modules in on their Degree Programme

        To come to their own understanding and explanation of the political issues covered

        Understand the main dynamics, actors, factors to be considered in order to analytically understand and causally explain these contemporary political issues

        Skills

        Critical and Independent Thinking
        Ability to integrate conceptual and empirical information and data
        Critically analyse evidence and normative positions and appreciate different analyses of the same issue
        Summarise the main points of different issues, positions and approaches to understanding politics
        Understand complex issues, different understandings and perspectives on political issues
        Verbal and written communication of complex issues and express one’s own critical understanding of published research and other module resources
        Managing and prioritising knowledge: identify relevant and subject-specific knowledge, sources and data; manage such information in an independent manner
        Analytical Thinking: identify, understand, interpret and evaluate relevant subject-specific arguments made by others; construct independent arguments

        Assessment

        Essay (35%), Participation (10%), Portfolio (55%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI1003

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • The Long Road to Black Lives Matter
        Overview

        A systematic introduction to ways in which history is used outside the university campus, including in museums and exhibitions, film, memorials and political discussion. The course will involve visits to local museums and students will get a chance to work together to pitch a new public history project. Previous projects have included public exhibitions, new museums or digital apps. The module focuses on the history of race, ethnicity, slavery, colonialism and anti-colonialism and their representations in pubic history.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students who successfully complete the module should • Be able to demonstrate an understanding of the role of academic history within society; • Be able to present historical information systematically and in accordance with normal

        academic practice; • Be able to demonstrate an understanding of the requirements of effective group work • Have identified a dissertation topic and be able to demonstrate an ability to place it in its broad historiographical context.

        Skills

        Working in groups; oral communication skills, public history theory.

        Assessment

        NONE

        Coursework

        60%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        40%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS1005

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

    • Year 2
      • Politics and Society in 19th Century Ireland
        Overview

        The union and post-union government of Ireland; the development of nationalism and unionism in their different forms; the relationship between religion, politics and society; economic and social development, the famine and emigration; gender relations and the family; the land question and attempts to resolve it; Home Rule and resistance to it; Ireland’s relations with the British empire.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students should understand the key developments in Ireland’s political and social history over the course of the nineteenth century, in terms of continuities and changes.

        Skills

        The acquisition, weighing and assessment of historical information and interpretation. Analytical skills in interpreting and critiquing primary sources. Development of presentation skills involving the analysis and interpretation of material and articulation of evidence-based argument.

        Assessment

        Students must: 1. Complete and submit a summative essay of 3,500-4,000 words. 2. Complete and submit a sources paper of 1,500-2,000 words. Contribute to tutorial discussion.

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS2011

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The American South 1619-1865
        Overview

        In a nation which would later commit itself to upholding the ideals of freedom and democracy, the early American South developed a distinct social order based on the enslavement and subordination of Africans and their descendants. This course will explore the development of southern distinctiveness over two centuries, from the evolution of racial ideology in the early Chesapeake to the armed defence of the South's "peculiar institution" in the Civil War.

        Learning Outcomes

        To explore and understand the unique development and problems of the American South.

        Skills

        The ability to analyse and explain orally and on paper, the complex issues relating to the topic.

        Assessment

        60% essay, 30% assignment, 10% tutorial participation.

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS2028

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Politics and Society in 20th Century Ireland
        Overview

        Home Rule or Union?; Social and economic change; Gaelic revival and parliamentary politics; separatism; the Home Rule/Ulster crisis, 1912-14; war, rebellion and revolution; partition, independence and devolution.

        Learning Outcomes

        To understand the course of Irish development during the remaining years of the Union; partition, independence and devolution in Northern Ireland.

        Skills

        The acquisition and analysis of information; prioritisation and interpretation; effective presentation of written and oral reports.

        Assessment

        Assignment (30%), Paper (60%), Tutorial Contribution (10%)

        Coursework

        30%

        Written

        60%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS2012

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The American South, 1865-1980
        Overview

        The outcome of the Civil War sealed the destruction of slavery and raised hopes among African Americans and others of a new,more egalitarian social order in the American South. After a promising start in the immediate aftermath of the War,those hopes were crushed beneath the weight of racial reaction and the demands of the region's new industrial order,leaving ordinary southerners of both races languishing amidst intense poverty and racial violence. In this module we will attempt to understand both the remarkable resilience of racial divisions in the American South and the periodic attempts on the part of black and white southerners to challenge regional "tradition".

        Learning Outcomes

        To explore and understand the consequences of the ending of slavery in the American South.

        Skills

        An ability to analyse orally and on paper, the complex issues of race in the context of the American South.

        Assessment

        60% Essay, 30% Assignment, 10% tutorial participation.

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS2029

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Politics and Policy of the European Union
        Overview

        This module serves as in introduction to the European Union and demonstrates how this evolving and expanding tier of European governance impacts on national political systems . The module is divided into three parts. The first part sets the scene for the study of the EU and introduces students to the evolution of the EU, the treaty base and the theories of integration. The second part explores the composition and powers of the main EU institutions (such as the Commission, the European Parliament, the Council and the Courts). It also accounts for the decision making process and the role of NGOs in the EU system. The final part focuses on the EU policy base and seeks to explain where and why the EU is active in certain policy areas. It examines a series of salient policy areas including the common agricultural policy, environmental policy, foreign and defence policy, enlargement.

        Learning Outcomes

        To provide an understanding of the evolution of the European Union as the principal instrument of integration in Western Europe.

        Skills

        Development of critical and analytical skills. Emphasis on comparative methodology and the ability to synthesise knowledge in both written and oral form in a cross-national (European) context.

        Assessment

        Students must submit Two Essays/Reports (90%). Participation and attendance (10%).

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2001

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Modern Political Thought
        Overview

        This module focuses on a critical analysis of key texts and themes in the history of modern political thought. The study of the work of key thinkers in the modern era serves a range of purposes. Firstly, we can, in some instances, learn directly from these works, acquiring ideas that we can apply to our own circumstances. Secondly, through studying these texts we can learn about ourselves and our own political, ethical, and intellectual situation, through coming to a better understanding of how these works have contributed to shaping the world that we live in. Finally, through engaging with the complex arguments constructed in classic texts we can hope to learn how we might come to construct political arguments of our own. The choice of texts to be studied may vary from year to year.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will:
        - Be familiar with the central arguments of key texts in the history of modern political thought
        - Understand the main traditions of thought which have shaped contemporary political
        thinking
        - Be equipped with the analytical skills necessary to necessary to interpret and criticise
        complex arguments.

        Skills

        The aim of the module is to provide students with the necessary analytical and historical tools to approach major theoretical texts. It will provide students with an opportunity to develop communication skills (listening, oral and written), and equip students with basic intellectual skills (particulary critical thinking and analysis). It is fundamental to both further study, and future chances of employment, that students are able to present other people's arguments in an informed, coherent, and efficient manner, and be able to point out weaknesses in apparently plausible arguments.

        Assessment

        Essay 1 (35%), Essay 2 (55%), Presentation (10%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2005

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Irish Politics
        Overview

        An examination of the Politics of Ireland (North and South) since 1920.

        Learning Outcomes

        To provide an understanding of the political systems of both parts of Ireland and to understand Northern Ireland as an example of a deeply divided society.

        Skills

        The ability to think analytically, communicate ideas with peers, reproduce ideas in an exam setting, and construct cogent essays.

        Assessment

        Continual Assessment (55%), Essay (35%), Participation (10%)

        Coursework

        30%

        Written

        60%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2013

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • International Relations
        Overview

        This module sets out to help students understand and analyse the development of International Relations as a discipline through its theories and major issues. The key theories of international relations are examined, from Realism, through Marxism to contemporary approaches such as Poststructuralism, with a focus upon how each one criticises and responds to the others revealing its strengths and weaknesses. Within this, major issues of international relations will be explored from a theoretical and conceptual perspective, such as the balance of power, peace, international society, norms and gender. Finally, the course turns to modern challenges to the discipline of International Relations, such as International Political Economy, the spread of Globalization, and contemporary concerns with security and the War on Terror. The module therefore considers how well International Relations is responding to these challenges.

        Learning Outcomes

        Upon completion of this module, students should be able to: Understand the main approaches to the study of IR, including current theoretical developments in the discipline. Understand the relationship between the academic analysis of international relations and the actual behaviour (e.g. foreign policy) of states. Communicate ideas to others in a clear and concise manner, both orally and in written form. Pursue intellectual questions in a rigorous and academic manner, employing analytical skills and critical thinking.

        Skills

        The module aims to equip students with basic intellectual skills (e.g. critical thinking, analysis, problem solving), as well as communication skills.

        Assessment

        Continual Assessment (10%), Essay (55%), Journal (35%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2017

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Studying Politics
        Overview

        Without understanding the methodology of research practice it is not possible to undertake political research effectively or to critically assess the work of others. Equally, without research skills it is not possible to test our assertions, assumptions, knowledge and preconceptions about the political world. Research methods are therefore crucial if we are to be able to address the important questions of ‘how do we know’ and ‘what is there to know’, which are critical in all fields of political studies. Consequently, this module has four aims. Firstly, to introduce students to the political research environment, incorporating both the elements and processes that underpin inquiry. Secondly, the module seeks to examine different methodologies and techniques to enable the undertaking of both original and critical research. Thirdly, to encourage candidates to develop a critical appreciation of data including both content and use. Fourthly, to promote a general awareness and working knowledge not only of the complexities of political research but also of the variety of environments in which research takes place.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

        • Describe the relationship between the researchers of, the actors in and the environment determining political and social processes.
        • Develop communication skills through computer lab participation and writing for coursework.
        • Identify both the strengths and weaknesses of different research techniques.
        • Pursue intellectual questions on the basis of interpretation and analysis of data in a rigorous and academic manner by employing analytical skills and critical thinking.
        • Critically assess the collection of data and understand its use as a tool for understanding political processes.
        • Evaluate and discriminate between qualitative and quantitative data analyses and, in doing so, demonstrate a willingness to implement good practice.
        • Interpret the research of others and appreciate the problems involved in both collection and interpretation of data.
        • Compare, contrast and choose between different quantitative research methods and justify the choice through an awareness and working knowledge of quantitative methodology.
        • Implement basic intellectual skills that include data understanding, analysis, numeracy, and problem solving.
        • Present research findings in an appropriate manner and communicate finding to others in a clear and concise manner in written form.

        Skills

        To think analytically and methodologically, to apply quantitative analysis techniques using specialised computer software, and to interpret and communicate results of statistical analyses.

        Assessment

        Assignment (30%), Presentation (10%), Research (60%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2043

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Roman Origins of the East and West; From Augustus to Charlemagne
        Overview

        This course focuses on one of the most exciting periods in the formation of the East and West, namely, the transition between the ancient and medieval worlds. Invasions of ‘barbarian’ hordes across the Rhine and Danube frontiers in the fifth and sixth centuries ended a stable system; in the seventh and eighth centuries, the invasions came from the south, as the forces of Islam exploded from Arabia and changed the Mediterranean Sea from a Roman lake to a contested frontier. In response to these political changes, individuals such as Augustine, Jerome, Basil of Caesarea, Gregory Nazianzos, Basil of Nyssa and John Chrysostom sought to incorporate the Classical heritage into the Christian life. Beginning with the Emperor Augustus, this course charts the development of the Roman empire and surveys its major institutions and culture, from the mechanics of autocracy to the character of polytheism. The success of Christianity within this empire is examined, particularly in relation to persecution and the ways in which the triumphant Christian church shaped ‘late antiquity’ are explored. This world, however, became subject to forces of change that transformed it dramatically. The course proceeds to highlight the significance of Theoderic, King of the Ostrogoths, who strove to unify Roman and barbarian cultures. It also examines Justinian the Great, the Byzantine emperor, whose attempt to reunite the Roman world ultimately failed. This course looks at Rome’s successor states in the East and West, namely medieval Byzantium, Frankish Gaul, Ostrogothic Italy and Visigothic Spain. The emphasis is on the theme of continuity and change. We look at how the Franks, having conquered Gaul, drew on Roman imperial and Christian ideology to legitimise their authority; how the Visigoths, having established their authority in Spain, produced a remarkably rich Roman-based culture; how the Romans of Byzantium, under hammer blows of Gothic, Hunnic and Muslim invasions, forged an enduring Byzantine culture combining Roman polity, Greek civilisation and Christian religion.

        Learning Outcomes

        • Help students think critically, reason logically and evaluate evidence.
        • Develop students’ written and communication skills.
        • Encourage critical appraisal of historical sources.
        • Enable students make effective use of electronic sources

        Skills

        • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of Late Roman and early medieval history.
        • Make conceptual links between different historical periods and places.
        • Trace concepts and ideas over time.
        • Critically evaluate historical issues and problems in this field.
        • Write essays and develop arguments, making extensive use of both primary and secondary literature in the field

        Assessment

        • One assessed essay – 70%
        • Assignment - 20%
        • Tutorial participation – 10%

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS2049

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Expansion of Medieval Europe, 1000-1300
        Overview

        A dramatic expansion of medieval Europe occurred between about 1000-1300. This module will explore the growth of kingship and state formation, but will cover not only political history, but also economic and social, religious and cultural change. The main historical themes that dominated and shaped the history of Europe in the central Middle Ages will be explored with a focus on those institutions that laid the foundations for the formation of modern Europe.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students should acquire knowledge of the history of medieval Europe and be able to recognize and evaluate historical debates relating to the content of the module; be able to engage with historical interpretations and to judge between them; be able to evaluate the strengths and limitations of the principal primary sources relating to the module; be able to write informed and critical analysis of the historical issues and problems explored in the module.

        Skills

        Development of skills in critically analysing, contextualising and evaluating different types of written evidence; development of a critical understanding and appraisal of different types of historical writing and of approaches and concepts used by historians;; development of writing skills through formative and assessed coursework and a timed examination; development of oral communicative skills through tutorial presentation.

        Assessment

        Assignment (20%), Essay (70%), Tutorial Contribution (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS2047

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Europe between the Wars, 1919-1939
        Overview

        The course will stress the major themes and distinctive modern conflicts of the interwar period, particularly those resulting from World War I and leading to World War II. Considerable attention will be given to the rise of fascism, Nazism and other forms of right-wing authoritarianism. The internationalisation of the Spanish Civil War will be used as a case study to explore political polarisation and the gradual collapse of the post-Versailles order. Throughout the course, students will become familiar with the cultural and social implications of the interwar clash of ideologies, including the impact on women, children and ethnic minorities.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate: 1) an understanding of the main political developments that occurred in Europe between the end of the Great War and the outbreak of the Second World War 2) an understanding of the principal phases of the breakdown of the Versailles order 3) an understanding of the reasons for the rise to power of Lenin, Stalin, Mussolini and Hitler, and the social and political consequences of these dictatorships 4) an understanding of the impact of left and right-wing authoritarianism on ethnic minorities, women and children 5) an awareness of the historiography of the interwar period and an ability to engage in key debates on the subject

        Skills

        On completion of this module, students should have acquired the following skills: 1) the ability to engage critically with various kinds of historical evidence, including primary and secondary literature, official documents, documentary and fiction film, photography and the press 2) the ability to distil historical research into a cogent, well-written, well-organized and well-argued essay 3) the ability to engage with confidence and authority in critical discussions with classmates and the tutor on a wide variety of themes related to Interwar Europe 4) the ability to formulate original responses to questions on Europe between the war based on research, reading and tutorial discussion.

        Assessment

        This course is assessed by an assessed essay (60%), a second essay (30%) and tutorial participation (10%).

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS2050

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • American Politics
        Overview

        This survey course introduces students to the American political system, current debates on democracy in America and its role in the world. The first section of the module, examines the basic institutions of the American political system, its origins, development and evolving dynamics. Particular emphasis is placed on the US Constitution, federalism and the system of checks and balances, as well as the three branches of government: the Presidency, Congress and the Supreme Court. The second section constitutes a more normative engagement with issues relating to the contemporary nature of American democracy, examining in particular controversies surrounding the electoral process and the role of socioeconomic inequality and race in shaping political outcomes.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will acquire an understanding of the basic components of the American political system and its historical and ideational origins. Students will be conversant with contemporary debates on the nature of democracy and its socio-economic context in America.

        Skills

        Ability to think conceptually and pursue rigorous, systematic inquiry into some aspect(s) of American Politics. Ability to construct a lucid argument, theoretically and empirically informed, in examination paper form, and to present oral arguments in a concise manner.

        Assessment

        Analysis of Data (35%), Essay (55%), Participation and Attendance (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2018

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The making of contemporary Britain: 1914 to the present
        Overview

        The course examines key debates in British history between 1914 and the present and complements "The making of modern Britain". It charts political, economic and social change in twentieth century Britain, including decolonisation and the loss of empire.

        Learning Outcomes

        At the end of the module, students should have developed an increased ability to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of contemporary British history as well as an enhanced ability to critically evaluate historical issues and problems in this field. Increased ability to discuss key historiographical debates relating to contemporary Britain. Students should also have enhanced ability to prepare written analyses of a primary source that draws upon key secondary literature. Increased ability to gather and synthesise material.

        Skills

        Students should develop an enhanced ability to think critically, reason logically and evaluate evidence, as well as to have further developed written and communication skills. They should also have an increased critical appraisal of and engagement with historical sources. Enhanced ability to make effective use of a range of sources.

        Assessment

        60% essay, 30% article review, 10% tutorial contribution.

        Coursework

        30%

        Written

        60%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS2018

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Revolutionary Europe, 1500-1789
        Overview

        The module will examine the revolutionary developments in Europe from the age of the high Renaissance around 1500 to the outbreak of the French Revolution in 1789 and its aftermath. Although the course content will be structured and delivered chronologically, the main focus of the module will be on those specific events and developments that historians have labelled ‘revolutionary’. Included in the analysis will be the cultural innovations brought on by the Renaissance, the upheavals in the religious world effected by the Reformation, the social and political changes associated with the rise of the state, and the revolution in forms of thought (from the scientific to the political) that emerged during the Age of Enlightenment. The module will end with a close study of the French Revolution, which was in many ways the culmination of the events and developments that make up the content of the module.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students should acquire knowledge of the main historical developments of early modern European history and the extent to which the various revolutionary aspects of the age (from the religious and the cultural to the social and political) led to a fundamental reshaping of society and provided the foundations for the making of the modern age. The student should acquire knowledge and understanding of these historical developments in historical context, by which is meant they should acquire an understanding of the cause, consequences, and basic histories of developments such as the Renaissance, Reformation, state formation, and the rise of political revolution. They should also be able to place the specific developments within the broader dynamic of early modern history, thus acquiring a knowledge of how the various revolutions during this period influenced each other.

        Skills

        The module should enable the student to develop the following skills:

        Analytical Thinking: the ability to identify, understand, interpret and evaluate relevant subject-specific arguments made by others; to construct independent arguments;
        Critical & Independent Thinking: the ability to think critically and construct one’s own position in relation to existing and ongoing debates in the field;
        Communication Skills: ability to communicate clearly with others, both orally and in writing;
        Efficient and Effective Work Practice: demonstrate the ability to work efficiently to deadlines for both written work and tutorial presentations;
        Clear Organisation of Information: show efficiency in the organisation of large amounts of complex information and the ability to identify, describe and analyse the key features of the information.

        Assessment

        Essay 60%
        Continual Assessment 30%
        Tutorial Contributions10%

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS2057

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Security and Terrorism
        Overview

        This module explores contemporary approaches to the study of security and terrorism. It will examine changes in definitions of security and terrorism, the evolution of approaches to the study of security and terrorism. Students will be familiarised with the main “threats” to state and human security; the changing nature of war and other organised violence; and areas of security policy and practice including arms control, alliance formation, peacekeeping and peacebuilding, among others. Students will also explore domestic and transnational non-state terrorism, state terrorism, and counter-terrorism policy and practice.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of the course students will:
        • Be familiar with the main theories and approaches to the study of security and terrorism; and the debates between them.
        • Understand and be able to discuss the relative merits of different theoretical approaches to security issues.
        • Be able to critically evaluate international policy and practice in key areas of security policy and counter-terrorism.
        • Be able to communicate ideas to others in a clear and concise manner, both orally and in written form;
        • Be able to pursue intellectual questions in a rigorous and academic manner, employing analytical skills and critical thinking.

        Skills

        Managing & Prioritizing Knowledge: identify relevant and subject-specific knowledge, sources and data; manage such information in an independent manner.
        • Analytical Thinking: identify, understand, interpret and evaluate relevant subject-specific arguments made by others; construct independent arguments.
        • Critical & Independent Thinking: ability to think critically and construct one’s own position in relation to existing and ongoing debates in the field.

        Communication Skills, including oral and written communication.
        • Time-Management
        • Information Technology skills;
        • Organisation and communication skills;
        • Enterprise Thinking.

        Assessment

        Coursework (55%), Coursework (35%), Tutorial Attendance (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2055

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • International Organisations
        Overview

        This module on International Organizations offers an introduction into the multilateral global security architecture. The core focus of the module is collective security. The module IO thus will deal with international law, collective security, regimes in international security and International security organizations. The United Nations system forms the core of the study. Peacekeeping, peace enforcement, peace building and the ‘outsourcing’ of core collective security tasks to regional players will dominate the sessions of the module. Core military interventions by international organizations will be analyzed. The module thus will deal with military interventions by the UN, NATO, CIS/CSTO, EU and core security and mediation tasks by the CIS, SCO and OSCE. The new policy agenda of energy security will be tackled by studying resource control: The NPT regime, the IAEA and oil and gas regimes thus will be scrutinized at the end of the semester. The major aim of the module is to outline the ‘institutionalized’ world order of today – with its hierarchies, cleavages and contradictions. The module is wedded to a strategic studies approach to IR.

        Learning Outcomes

        None

        Skills

        None

        Assessment

        Coursework (55%), Coursework (35%), Participation (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2056

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Nationalism and Liberation in 20th Century Africa
        Overview

        Nationalism has been a key factor in African history since the late 19th Century. How has it emerged, under what forms, how has it evolved, when and how did it become a mass ideology, and what happened to it after the independence of African states in the second half of the 20th Century? This module offers a critical look at these themes, focusing on ideas, cultures and the politics of nationalism and liberation. The module considers different theories and articulate their discussion to a consideration of diverse case studies, e.g. Ghana, Congo, Angola, Mozambique, and South Africa.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students who successfully complete the module should
        • Be able to demonstrate an understanding of the history of Africa in the late 19th and 20th centuries;
        • Be able to develop critical arguments about nationalism, liberation and the non-Western world;
        • Be able to demonstrate an understanding of the requirements of essay writing, archival work, and oral presentation.

        Skills

        Critical writing; archival research; oral presentation.
        Archival research will be kept to a minimum, in an archive in Belfast or online. The oral presentation will be a presentation of archival material to be used for the second essay.

        Assessment

        Essay (60%); Assignment (30%), Tutorial participation (10%).

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS2061

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Recording History
        Overview

        Students should develop knowledge of twentieth-century social history through a case-study of Belfast. By conducting their own interview, and analysing those conducted by the other members of the group, students should develop a working knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of oral history as a research method and thus enhance their understanding of the broader methodological issues posed by research in modern social history. They should develop team-working skills (through collaborative research on their chosen topic), as well as their capacity for independent learning (through the conduct of one-to-one interviews and the transcription and analysis of those interviews). Oral presentational skills will be developed through reporting on work-in-progress in seminars. The module will, therefore, significantly enhance many of the skills related to the types of employment to which history graduates aspire, i.e. team-working, interpersonal skills, the ability to synthesize large bodies of information, and the compilation of written reports.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of this module, students should have acquired the following skills:

        Team-working (through collaborative research on your chosen topic)
        A capacity for independent learning (through the conduct of one-to-one interviews and the transcription and analysis of those interviews).
        Oral presentational and interpersonal skills will be developed through reporting on work-in-progress in seminars and by carrying interviewing.
        The ability to synthesize large bodies of information
        The ability to compile professionally prepared written reports.

        Skills

        Taking Recording History should enable students to:

        develop skills in the collection and analysis of primary sources
        gain experience of project management
        develop research skills
        gain experience of pitching project ideas in a non-academic context
        develop experience of the professional compilation and presentation of research results, including footnoting, referencing

        Assessment

        Each student will record an oral history interview. They will then produce a professional interview transcript accompanied with a reflective report on the interview (30%). The interview transcripts will be distributed amongst all students to facilitate two further elements of assessment. The first will be a group presentation. This will take the form of a pitch to BBC Radio Ulster. Students will work in small groups to develop a programming idea based on the recorded interviews (10%). Students will also use the transcripts in writing a 3,500-4,500 word project report (60%).

        Coursework

        80%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        20%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS2063

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Uniting Kingdoms
        Overview

        The aim of the course is to examine the interrelationships between the kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 1603 to 1815 and the factors contributing to the formation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in 1801. It will provide an overview of the principal events and developments following the union of the Crowns in 1603, including the wars of religion of the mid seventeenth century, the establishment of a ‘parliamentary monarchy’ in 1688, the Anglo-Scottish Union, the rise of the press, the making of empire, religious and intellectual change, Jacobite rebellions, the 1798 rising in Ireland and the British-Irish Union. An important feature of this module will be the use of primary printed materials through electronic databases, especially EEBO and ECCO, for which training will be provided.

        Learning Outcomes

        An understanding of the various relationships between England, Ireland, and Scotland and the forces that encouraged the creation of the United Kingdom; An ability to engage with the most important historiographical debates relating to the subject-matter of the module; An ability to use electronic resources and to develop key research skills; Effective communication skills; An ability to write an informed analysis of historical problems discussed in the module; An ability to work independently.

        Skills

        Enhanced ability to think critically, reason logically, and evaluate evidence; Further develop communication skills, both written and oral; Critical appraisal of, engagement with, and effective use of a variety of historical sources.

        Assessment

        Assessment
        60% Essay
        30% Assignment
        10% Tutorial Contribution

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS2064

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Alexander The Great and the Creation of the Hellenistic World
        Overview

        An analytical survey of ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern history from the conquest of the whole of Balkan Greece by Philip II of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great, to the emergence of successor kingdoms within Alexander’s conquered territories after his death in 323 BC. After an introduction on sources and methodology, the course proceeds chronologically. Topics receiving special emphasis include: the rise, and the ultimate triumph, of Macedon over the Greek city-states; Alexander’s war against Persia and subsequent conquests; the fragmentation of Alexander’s empire after his death; and events in Sicily and the West (including the expansion of Rome in Italy).

        Learning Outcomes

        To apply objective historical methodology to a period of alleged decline in Greek history.

        Skills

        Skills of analysis and evaluation, in particular the organization and interpretation of widely scattered and fragmentary source material.

        Assessment

        Essay (60%), Coursework (30%), Participation (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS2020

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Apocalypse! End of the World.
        Overview

        The aim of the course is to introduce students to historical and anthropological reflection on millennial / millenarian beliefs and movements across space and time. Taking a long view of historical events and using case studies of present-day groups that attend to ideas about the end of the world, taking advantage of the interdisciplinary character of the School, and using a wide range of primary sources, including novels, film, websites, and ethnographic case studies and film, this course will invite students to consider the ancient roots of millennial theory; its foundational texts, exponents / prophets and movements; examples of well-known failed and successful millennial claims and movements, including the Crusades, radical puritans, Mormons, Jewish Zionists, American evangelicals, new religious movements, including UFO and suicide cults, and radical Islamists; the use of millennial theory as presentist critique; the development of millennial majorities, and the social, cultural and political implications of their dominance; millennialism’s place in utopian theory; and a final consideration of theoretical rejoinders, in which the course leaders encourage students to consider whether millennial claims might be right – for example, in terms of global warming – and whether that might change the way in which historians and anthropologists should approach the subject.

        Learning Outcomes

        An understanding of the broad history and anthropology of millennial movements across space and time; An ability to discuss millennial ideas and movements using heuristic tools from history and anthropology; An ability to use electronic resources and to develop key research skills; Effective communication skills; An ability to write an informed analysis of historical problems discussed in the module; An ability to work independently.

        Skills

        Enhanced ability to think critically, reason logically, and evaluate evidence; Further develop communication skills, both written and oral; Critical appraisal of, engagement with, and effective use of a variety of historical and anthropological sources.

        Assessment

        Essay 30%, Essay 60%; Tutorial Participation 10%

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HAP2065

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Cabinets of Curiosity: Museums Past and Present
        Overview

        This module will focus on museums from the Renaissance to the modern day, charting the transition from private collecting to public display. It will consider the shifting roles of museums across time and will provide students with an understanding of how and why museums’ aims, purposes and functions continue to change. Students will engage with debates about object collection, preservation, repatriation and display, and will explore some of the current issues facing museums. They will also consider diverse museum audiences, including the elite and wealthy audiences of the eighteenth century and international audiences served by twenty-first-century online museums. Through their reading, research and museum visits, students will also begin to appreciate the different roles of museum staff and through their object engagement project, will gain vital skills that could be useful for their own future employment.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of this module, the successful student should be able to
        - Discuss the history of museums
        - Understand debates about the purpose, aims and roles of museums in society
        - Explain how and why the function of museums and their target audiences have changed over time
        - Identify current issues facing museums, particularly in Northern Ireland
        - produce object labels or object biographies for a wide audience

        Skills

        - Analytical skills
        - Research skills
        - Object appreciation skills
        - Written, oral and visual communication skills
        - Debating skills
        - Computer/multimedia skills
        - Group work skills

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS2067

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Northern Ireland Conflict and paths to peace
        Overview

        What caused the Northern Irish conflict? What factors sustained it? What role did world leaders, paramilitaries, clergy and local politicians play in progressing the peace process? And what role does civil society, arts, culture and heritage play in building social cohesion?
        This interdisciplinary, team-taught module will draw on expertise from across the School of History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics to explore some of the key themes of the Global Bachelor’s Program. Using Northern Ireland as a case study, it will ask questions about the means through which societies can move from conflict to peace, about the roles that various actors can play in conflict resolution, and about the roles that public representations and explorations of the past can play both in entrenching divisions and in furthering peace and mutual understanding.

        Learning Outcomes

        By the end of this module the successful student should be able to demonstrate in assessed essays, coursework and seminar contributions:
        - A familiarity with the major issues and debates around the development of the Northern Ireland conflict, the peace process, and the role of civil society in peace-building. - A sense of the interrelatedness of political, economic, cultural and social forces in shaping the past
        - An appreciation of the internal and external forces that contributed to the conflict AND helped build peace
        - A heightened sense of the complexity of identity, politics and place in Northern Ireland
        - Demonstrable awareness of the role that arts, culture, heritage and public engagement with the past can play in building social integration.

        Skills

        On completion of this module the student should be able to:
        - Understand and process complex information
        - Engage in sustained and self-directed reading
        - Engage in intellectual discussion based on reading and class content
        - Communicate complex information effectively and with precision in oral presentation and in writing to an academic audience

        Assessment

        Essay 3,000 words 50%
        Reading Journal entries x 4 40%
        Tutorial Participation 10%

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HAP2001

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Peace and Conflict Studies
        Overview

        This module will introduce students to the analysis of civil wars and the fields of conflict analysis and peace studies. The aim of this module is to introduce students to theoretical and empirical problems in the study of the outbreak, development and resolution of armed civil conflicts. It explores the conflict cycle, the complexity of violent conflict, dynamics of political violence, the effects of certain situations on conflict dynamics, different types of actors in civil war, the outcomes of civil war, peace processes, and techniques such as mediation. It explores the main concepts (such as “conflict”, “civil war”, “peace”, etc.), some theories (such as the causes of civil war, the dynamics, and consequences), and some issues and debates (such as when and how to mediate conflicts) in peace and conflict studies. It also covers theoretical and methodological issues in peace and conflict studies, such as issues in classification and measurement.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will:
        -Understand basic approaches to the causes, development and resolution of conflicts
        - Be able to identify and critically evaluate central concepts, issues, debates, and obstacles in civil wars, conflict resolution and peace
        - Be able to explain, critically evaluate, and discuss central questions and theories on causes, development and resolution of conflicts
        - Conduct independent research by independently finding, gathering, and evaluating information and texts on armed conflicts and peace
        - Be able to recognise and differentiate between descriptive, explanative and normative studies
        - Be able to distinguish between and locate primary and secondary sources of information
        - Be able to identify different approaches to conceptualization and measurement of key variables as they relate to Peace and Conflict Studies
        - Communicate ideas to others in a clear and concise manner, both orally and in written form
        - Pursue intellectual questions in a rigorous and academic manner, employing analytical skills and critical thinking.

        Skills

        This module will assist in developing students’ skills in a number of important areas. These include:

        Intellectual skills
        - Managing & Prioritizing Knowledge: identify relevant and subject-specific knowledge, sources and data; manage such information in an independent manner
        - Analytical Thinking: identify, understand, interpret and evaluate relevant subject-specific arguments made by others; construct independent arguments
        - Critical & Independent Thinking: ability to think critically and construct one’s own position in relation to existing and ongoing debates in the field

        Professional and career development skills
        - Communication Skills: ability to communicate clearly with others, both orally and in writing
        - Teamwork: ability to work with others in a team, negotiate conflicts and recognize different ways of learning
        - Diversity: ability to acknowledge and be sensitive to the range of cultural differences present in the learning environment
        - Self-Reflexivity: ability to reflect on one’s own progress and identify and act upon ones own development needs with respect to life-long learning and career development
        - Time Management: ability to negotiate diverse and competing pressures; cope with stress; and achieve a work / life balance

        Technical and practical skills
        - Information Technology: demonstrate the knowledge and ability to use contemporary and relevant ICT

        Organizational skills
        - Efficient and effective work practice: demonstrate ability to work efficiently to deadlines
        - Clear organisation of information: show efficiency in the organisation of large amounts of complex information and the ability to identify, describe and analyse the key features of the information
        - Organisation and communication: demonstrate ability to use evidence to develop logical and clear arguments; show aptitude for the effective use of information in a direct and appropriate way
        - Enterprising thinking: Demonstrate ability to think and argue in novel and enterprising ways, to display originality of thought and argument and the ability to clearly support arguments in innovative ways

        Assessment

        1 Policy Report - 35%; 1 Essay - 55%; 1 Presentation - 10%

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2065

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Identity Politics in Diverse Societies
        Overview

        Liberal values in Europe, as elsewhere, are coming under serious threat, driven by identity politics designed to exploit societal divisions. The historical link between liberalism and diversity in Europe, and the extent to which one can negotiate and accommodate, if not facilitate the other, holds the key to sustainable, coherent and peaceful societies. The module provides an overview and critical analysis of minority protection offering engagement with issues underpinning national politics, law and societal processes in Europe. Using a critical approach to contemporary politics, this module provides:

        - a historical analysis of state formation and nation building in Europe with context of religious wars and political revolutions, including the (re-)conceptualisation of basic concepts and terms such as territoriality, sovereignty, state, nation and citizenship;

        - reassesses primordial views on ethnicity/nationality and language & religious identities and provides a sociologically informed political lens to reconcile the requirements for political unity, obligations to international law and ensure social cohesion for the culturally diverse society;

        - examines the liberal and national ideological framings of equality protection in liberal-democratic regimes and the number of mechanisms from voting rights to proportional representation in state bodies, forms of cultural and territorial autonomy and federalism to engage with the challenges of the ongoing re-nationalisation in all parts of Europe.

        This module will help students interested in European politics, human and minority rights, governance and nationalism, and politics of diverse societies to understand the origins of and anticipate political developments of their increasingly diverse societies.

        Learning Outcomes

        - Place issues of governance in diverse societies in the context of domestic and European political and legal obligations to ensure equality of all citizens;

        - Contrast the differential impact nation-state building had in different parts of Europe on diverse resident populations and reflect on the role of European integration on political process;

        - Ascertain importance of diversity and equality as guarantee for societal stability and peace in and around Europe

        - Understand and be able to reflect critically on the impact accommodation and support for minorities has on the likelihood of conflict in contemporary Europe

        - Communicate clearly and concisely, both orally and in written form on issues relating to equality and diversity in contemporary Europe

        - Pursue intellectual questions in an academic manner, using analytical skills and critical thinking to develop transferrable skills

        Skills

        Intellectual skills

        - Managing & Prioritizing Knowledge: identify relevant and subject-specific knowledge, sources and data; manage such information in an independent manner

        - Critical & Independent Thinking: ability to think critically and construct one’s own position in relation to existing and ongoing debates in the field

        Professional and career development skills

        - Communication Skills: ability to communicate clearly with others, both orally and in writing

        - Teamwork: ability to work with others in a team, negotiate conflicts and recognize different ways of learning

        - Self-Reflexivity: ability to reflect on one’s own progress and identify and act upon ones own development needs with respect to life-long learning and career development

        - Time Management: ability to negotiate diverse and competing pressures; cope with stress; and achieve a work / life balance

        Technical and practical skills

        - Information Technology: demonstrate the knowledge and ability to use contemporary and relevant ICT Organizational skills

        - Efficient and effective work practice: demonstrate ability to work efficiently to deadlines

        - Clear organisation of information: show efficiency in the organisation of large amounts of complex information and the ability to identify, describe and analyse the key features of the information

        - Organisation and communication: demonstrate ability to use evidence to develop logical and clear argument; show aptitude for the effective use of information in a direct and appropriate way

        Assessment

        The module each covers various elements and study techniques to approach, appreciate and understand issues underpinning politics in diverse societies. The module is designed in a lecture/tutorial format to introduce students to a range of issues not necessarily in clear sight outside the classroom in Belfast.

        Throughout the module, in lectures and tutorials students will be introduced to interdisciplinary method of assessing political process in diverse societies by discussing comparative political, legal, and social science methodologies. Students will be introduced to independent work as part of the assessment (see below) via literature assessment and synthesis.

        The module builds upon – but does not rely on – the PAI2011 Deeply Divided Societies offering a perspective on state led management of diversity that did not result in conflict. It offers an opportunity to consolidate the content learnt over L1 and L2, prepare students for independent learning in L3 and facilitates reflection on contemporary political issues.

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI2066

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

    • Year 3
      • The American Civil War and Reconstruction, 1860-1877
        Overview

        Against the backdrop of increasing tensions over slavery, Abraham Lincoln posed the question in 1855 of whether the United States could “as a nation, continue together permanently—forever—half slave and half free.” The answer came in 1861, when war broke out between the federal government at Washington and the newly seceded Confederacy. The American Civil War and the period of Reconstruction that followed are sometimes referred to by historians as a “Second American Revolution”: together they constitute one of the most dramatic social upheavals of the nineteenth century world, and their outcome established the foundations upon which—for better or worse—the modern United States would be built.
        Making use of a range of primary sources and some of the best recent scholarship in the vibrant field of Civil War & Reconstruction historiography, we will approach the events through close examination of key historical problems: sectionalism and the causes of war; Lincoln, war and emancipation; slavery and grand strategy, North and South; and Reconstruction & the limits of black freedom.

        Learning Outcomes

        To explore and understand this critical period in the history of the United States.

        Skills

        The ability to analyse and explain both orally and on paper, the complex issues relating to this topic.

        Assessment

        Students must submit Two Essays (90%). Continuous Assessment (10%).

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3035

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Origins of Protestantism
        Overview

        The module will examine the rise of Protestantism in the early modern period (1517-1740), from the onset of the Reformation in Germany and Switzerland to the spread of the movement throughout Europe and America to the eve of the mainstream Enlightenment.

        Learning Outcomes

        To introduce students to history of confessional development in Europe; to encourage critical thought.

        Skills

        Analysis of textual evidence (primary and secondary) and the ability to formulate arguments in written and oral form.

        Assessment

        Essay 60%
        Coursework 30%
        Tutorial Presentations 10%

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3022

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Soviet Union 1921-1991
        Overview

        The political, social, economic and international conditions leading to Bolshevik success after 1917; the nature of the Soviet state as evolving under Lenin ; the evolution of Stalin's personal rule and the Stalinist system; the nature and limits of de-stalinization under Kruschchev.

        Learning Outcomes

        To understand the Bolshevik takeover of Russia, the adaption of Marxism to Russian conditions and the adjustment of the peoples of Russia to such circumstances.

        Skills

        To discover, assess and select evidence mainly from secondary sources, to interpret and evaluate this material, to envisage the ways of thinking in a very different environment.

        Assessment

        Coursework (30%), Project (60%), Tutorial Contribution (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3039

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Contemporary Political Philosophy
        Overview

        This module examines problems in contemporary normative political philosophy. Topics may vary from year to year, but will typically include questions about the interpretation of values such as freedom, equality, and welfare, principles of distributive justice, equal respect and social recognition, pluralism, toleration, and democracy.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will:
        -be in a position to think critically about the normative aspects of political life,
        -understand and be able to construct normative arguments about moral and political problems.
        -be able to structure logical arguments involving abstract ideas in both discussion and written work.

        Skills

        Note-taking both at lectures and during private study of key texts; ability to structure tightly knit arguments concerning abstract ideas in both oral and written form; debating and other oral communication skills; teamwork in small groups; role play.

        Assessment

        Students must submit Two Essays/Coursework (90%). Continuous Assessment (10%).

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3025

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Internship
        Overview

        This double-weighted module, which is made available on a competitive basis, enables successful applicants to spend three working days per week for 12 weeks, in either the first or second semesters, with one of a range of public and private organisations in Northern Ireland and elsewhere. Previous student placements have been with the devolved government departments, the Equality Commission, the Police Ombudsman’s Office, the BBC, the Northern Ireland Local Government Association, the PSNI and a number of PR and consultancy firms. The module is an alternative to either the dissertation or the project for Level Three Single and Major Honours candidates and to Level Three Joint Honours candidates. To be eligible to apply, students on these pathways must have taken and passed PAI2043 – Studying Politics, at Level Two. The module offers a hands-on, workplace-based learning opportunity in the participating institutions during which they will contribute to their work and undertake a piece of assessed research work (the Project element of the module) that is academically rigorous and, ideally, enhances the operation of the relevant host institution.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will have significantly developed their administrative knowledge and capacity; acquired a clear understanding of the work, organisation and operation of the host institution; produced a body of work that is both academically sound and, ideally, of practical utility for the host institution; and developed and acquired a range of skills (see below) including working within a team setting and complying with the norms and ethical standards of a professional working environment. Students will also have learned to locate their applied experience with academic interests and concerns.

        Skills

        Intellectual skills
        - Managing & Prioritizing Knowledge: identify relevant and project-specific knowledge, sources and data; manage such information in an independent manner
        - Analytical Thinking: identify, understand, interpret and evaluate relevant subject-specific arguments made by others; construct independent arguments
        - Critical & Independent Thinking: ability to think critically and construct one’s own position in relation to existing tasks and ongoing debates in the field

        Professional and career development skills
        - Communication Skills: ability to communicate clearly with others, both orally and in writing
        - Teamwork: ability to work with others in a team, negotiate conflicts and recognize different ways of learning
        - Diversity: ability to acknowledge and be sensitive to the range of cultural differences present in the working environment
        - Self-Reflexivity: ability to reflect on one’s own progress and identify and act upon one’s own development needs with respect to life-long learning and career development
        - Time Management: ability to negotiate diverse and competing workplace pressures; cope with stress; and achieve a work / life balance

        Technical and practical skills
        - Information Technology: demonstrate the knowledge and ability to use contemporary and relevant ICT, and to learn new IT skills
        - Regulations and standards: students will be made aware of the current rules and regulations concerning information management and security in the workplace

        Organizational skills
        - Efficient and effective work practice: demonstrate ability to work efficiently to deadlines, both individually and as part of a team
        - Clear organisation of information: show efficiency in the organisation of large amounts of complex information and the ability to identify, describe and analyse the key features of the information
        - Organisation and communication: demonstrate ability to use evidence to develop logical and clear arguments; show aptitude for the effective use of information in a direct and appropriate way
        - Enterprising thinking: Demonstrate ability to think and argue in novel and enterprising ways, to display originality of thought and argument and the ability to clearly support arguments in innovative ways

        Assessment

        - Attendance for 36 days total in host workplace organisation
        - Submission of both forms of assessment- Journal (30%), Project (70%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        40

        Module Code

        PAI3097

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        Yes

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Gender and Politics
        Overview

        This module introduces students to the centrality of gender and sexuality in shaping political dynamics at the local, national and global level. It approaches the topic from three perspectives - feminist political thought; strategies for political mobilization and change; and the relevance of gender in international affairs. The module aims to offer an introduction to the contribution of feminist intersectional scholarship in challenging understandings of politics and international relations as gender-neutral and draws attention to the, often neglected, experiences, agency and political claims of gender minorities. It considers key contemporary issues such as intersectionality and feminist politics, sexuality and reproductive justice; social movements and anti-gender politics; war, peace and security; climate change and the politics of global crises.
        Lectures will chart the development of feminism in its diverse ideological strands and ‘waves’.
        Students will have the opportunity to discuss theoretical perspectives and empirical examples as entry points to the gendered complexities of global politics.

        Learning Outcomes

        To provide a political perspective on gender; to clarify the diversity of feminist thought; to analyse and explain the causes of women's inequality in the public and private realms; and to provide an understanding of the inequalities confronting women.

        Skills

        The ability to comprehend the politics of sex and gender in an historical and theoretical framework; to develop a political perspective on gender; to debate positions; to engage in small group activity; to improve oral presentation and essay-writing skills.

        Assessment

        Weekly research tasks 10%
        Learning Journal 35%
        Essay 55%

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3008

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Dissertation (Politics and International Studies)
        Overview

        The dissertation is a research project that the student develops, designs and implements. There is a Dissertation Synopsis of approximately 700 words and the end product is a substantial piece of written work of 12,000 words on a topic that has been agreed between the student and his/her supervisor.

        Learning Outcomes

        By the end of the dissertation, students will be able to: (a) develop a sustained argument, test a hypothesis, and/or write an original narrative; (b) carry out research including finding appropriate sources of information for the topic in question; (c) review appropriate theories for the topic.

        Skills

        Students participate in a workshop prior to registering for the dissertation, which focuses on how to formulate a dissertation question, how to research the dissertation and how to organise and write the dissertation. Further consultation and skills development with individual advisors. A further workshop is held at the start of the second semester. Students will work closely with an individual supervisor throughout the research, drafting and writing of their dissertation. The skill required for ongoing research and writing of a dissertation are acquired and monitored through liason with the supervisor.

        Assessment

        Dissertation synopsis (10%) Dissertation (90%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        40

        Module Code

        PAI3099

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        Yes

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Irish Revolution, 1917-1921
        Overview

        The module will explore revolutionary politics in Ireland between 1916 and 1921. Key themes will include the rise of Sinn Fein following the Easter Rising, the establishment of Dail Eireann, the Irish Volunteers' military campaign and the British government's response to these political and military challenges. The course will make use of a wide range of local and thematic studies to investigate controversial questions relating to the Irish revolution: what factors motivated republicans, how important was sectarianism in revolutionary violence, why did some areas of the country see little fighting and how important a factor was the north?

        Learning Outcomes

        An ability to identify the key issues and themes of this period. An understanding of the importance of the economic, social and cultural forces which contributed to the political events of this period. An ability to assess and evaluate a range of approaches to the key controversies relating to the Irish revolution. An understanding of the historiography of the Irish Revolution.

        Skills

        The ability to demonstrate an argument based on study of documents and secondary readings in a written essay and examination paper. Oral participation in tutorials through debate and presentations. Assessing and evaluating conflicting arguments in the secondary literature.

        Assessment

        Examination (60%), Essay (30%), Tutorial Contribution (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3073

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Earth, Energy, Ethics and Economy: The Politics of Unsustainability
        Overview

        The continuing problematic relationship between key dynamics of modern economic and social systems and the non-human world is one of the most pressing issues of the 21st century and will continue shape the political agenda both nationally and globally. This module will examine some of the key debates of the politics of sustainable development, including: green ethical and political theory; the role of the environment and nature in political theorising; the economic and policy alternatives to unsustainable development and the normative underpinnings of a sustainable society.

        Learning Outcomes

        Upon completion of this module students will: Have a firm understanding of the key ethical, political and economic dimensions of green theory Be able to identify and understand the varieties of schools of thinking with green theory. Have a firm understanding of sustainable development; Be able to relate green theory to the politics of sustainable development; Be able to relate green political theory to other schools of thought within contemporary political theory; Be able to articulate and defend their own understandings of both green political theory and sustainable development; Be able to relate the empirical and scientific arguments and debates about sustainable development to normative theorising about sustainable development; Be able to defend and explain interdisciplinary methodological approaches to the study of sustainable development

        Skills

        Knowledge of the main issues, thinkers, schools of thought and debates within green political and ethical theory; knowledge of the political, economic and ethical dimensions of debates about sustainable development; ability for independent research and study; critical, analytical and independent thinking; presenting informed arguments in class; critical independent and reasoned judgement and assessment and appreciation of the arguments of others; awareness and appreciation of the complexities and nuances of different normative positions; relating the issues, thinkers and schools of thought covered in this module to other modules that students have done in Politics or other pathways.

        Assessment

        Logbook (10%), 2 essays (1 x 1500-2000 words; 1 x 2500-3000 words) (90%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3026

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Popular Culture in England 1500-1700
        Overview

        Exploration of the cultural world of ordinary people in early modern Europe; the forms of popular culture; the relationship between elite and popular culture; the methodology historians have developed in order to study popular culture.

        Learning Outcomes

        To generate interest in early modern popular culture in Europe; to encourage critical thought.

        Skills

        Absorbing and evaluating various forms of evidence; constructing arguments in written form.

        Assessment

        Essay (60%), Coursework (30%), Tutorial Contribution (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3018

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • European Cultural Identities
        Overview

        An examination of the range of concepts related to the notion of identity in modern and contemporary Europe. The module offers an interdisciplinary survey of the construction of identity in localities, regions, and states of Western Europe, with a particular emphasis on the role of identity in cultural integration and diversity

        Learning Outcomes

        To introduce students to the notion of identity and the various factors (linguistic, ethnic, national, social, historical) which have contributed to the identity of western Europeans.

        Skills

        Development of critical and analytical skills. Emphasis on comparative methodology and the ability to synthesise knowledge in both written and oral form in a cross-national (European) context.

        Assessment

        Essay 1 (55%), Essay 2 (35%), Participation and Attendance (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3027

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Dissertation
        Overview

        Students will research and write a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words on an appropriate subject negotiated with a member of staff.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will have gained a detailed knowledge of the secondary literature and primary sources relating to a specific historical problem, and will have acquired first hand experience of the processes involved in producing a piece of historical writing based on primary sources.

        Skills

        Students will acquire skills in identifying, locating, and gathering information from a variety of sources, in analysing evidence and formulating reasoned conclusions, and in presenting the results of research and analysis in an appropriate format.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        40

        Module Code

        HIS3077

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        Yes

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Evangelical Protestantism in Ulster: From the United Irishmen to Ian Paisley
        Overview

        This course considers how protestant religion and evangelicalism shaped the response of groups and individuals to a variety of issues in the north of Ireland between 1798 and the present. Religious and cultural themes include revivalism, missionary activity, evolutionary science, gender, urban growth, philanthropy and the rise of religious fundamentalism. Political themes include the development of unionism, church and state in Northern Ireland, and Paisleyism. Students will be encouraged to place Irish developments in a broader context . They will encounter a range of primary source material including sermons, pamphlets, newspapers, religious tracts, sound recordings, and photographs.

        Learning Outcomes

        An understanding of the relationships between Protestantism, evangelicalism and society in the north of Ireland. An ability to engage with the most important historiographical debates relating to the subject-matter of the module. An ability to evaluate critically, and place in their particular historical context, primary documentary sources relating to the subject-matter of the module. An ability to write an informed analysis of the historical problems discussed in the module

        Skills

        Enhanced ability to think critically, reason logically, and work independently .Further develop communication skills, both written and oral. Critical appraisal of, engagement with, and effective use of a variety of historical sources

        Assessment

        60% - Assignment
        30% - Coursework
        10% - Tutorial Participation

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3046

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Kings, courts and culture in Carolingian Europe
        Overview

        This module focuses on the pivotal role played by the Carolingians in the intellectual and cultural formation of Europe. To this period, historians traditionally ascribe the following developments: the growth in the production of manuscripts, proliferation of scriptoria and preservation of classical writings. Key topics will be the royal patronage of artistic and literary activity; the vigorous use of Roman and Christian ideology, ritual and imagery; the growing interest in logic in the Carolingian schools; and the appearance of important scholars, philosophers and poets, most famously John Scottus Eriugena.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the following areas: Carolingian intellectual history, critical evaluation of historical issues and problems in this field, the historiographical debates relating to the Carolingian period, both primary and secondary literature in the field, how to gather and synthesise material relating to ninth-century Carolingian history

        Skills

        This module should help students develop their skills in the following areas: 1) Critical thinking and logical reasoning 2) Evaluation of evidence 3) Analysis of arguments 4)Construction of an argument 5)Oral communication 6)Written communication 7)Use of primary sources

        Assessment

        70% essay, 20% presentation, 10% tutorial contribution

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3079

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Politics of the Global Economy
        Overview

        This module examines how politics conceived as relations between governments and with and between various socio-economic interests and groups shapes the global economy and the power relations it represents. Various issues addressed in the module include: how to think about power and authority in the global economy; contrasting national models of capitalism; the United States as a global economic hegemon in the post 9/11 era; the political economy of the rise of BRIC; the Doha Round of trade talks; Credit Crunch (causes, implications and responses); the geo-politics of currency rivalry; the global governance of oil; and a new global economic order to replace the old order?

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will:

        Students will understand the importance of politics and the role of power in the global economy.

        Students will be able to debate a range of contemporary global economic issues with reference to the relevant academic literature.

        Students will have an appreciation and understanding of some of the key policy issues to be faced in the management of the global economy, the theoretical and normative debates surrounding them and the trade offs they entail.

        Students will be able to communicate ideas concisely and coherently in written and oral form.

        Students will be able to pursue intellectual questions in a rigorous and academic manner, based on analytical and critical thinking.

        Skills

        Students will be able to communicate ideas to others in coherent and concise, written and oral form;

        Students will be able to think analytically, critically and logically about a range of important contemporary social issues.

        Students will have the capacity to identify many of the key causes, strategies and motivations of contemporary global economic trends and developments.

        Assessment

        Assignment (35%)

        Critical Review (10%)

        Coursework (55%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3063

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Religion and Empire: Christian Missions ro Africa, Asia and Middle East
        Overview

        Christian missions are often seen as old fashioned, but for long they were at the forefront of modernity. They carried modernity overseas and brought back fresh ideas which helped shape new societies. This course investigates when and how Christian overseas expansion happened; how missionaries related to empire and indigenous peoples; why and how Africans or Asians chose to convert; what they did with the Christianitywith which they were confronted; and how missionary activities contributed to the elaboration of new ideas of race, class and scientific knowledge at home.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students who successfully complete the module should
        • Be able to demonstrate an understanding of the history of Christian expansion in the 19th and 20th centuries;
        • Be able to develop critical arguments about religion and modernity in the West and in the rest of the world;
        • Be able to engage successfully with archival material;
        • Be able to demonstrate an understanding of the requirements of essay writing, bibliographic work, and oral presentation.

        Skills

        Critical writing; archival research; oral presentation.
        Archival research will be kept to a minimum, in an archive in Belfast or online. The oral presentation will be a presentation of archival material to be used for the second (major) essay.

        Assessment

        Essay 1 (60%), Essay 2 (30%), Participation (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3099

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Far Right in Western Europe and North America
        Overview

        Right-wing extremist parties have experienced success in elections in a number of countries in Western Europe over the last two or three decades. This phenomenon has attracted widespread attention, both in the media and in academic circles, sparking a number of frequently asked questions: why have these parties suddenly become electorally successful? What exactly do they stand for? What kind of people vote for them? Why do people vote for them? Why have they experienced more success in some countries than in others? Should we be worried about their rise? And what can we, or mainstream political parties, do to counter their rise?

        This module aims to examine all these questions. It begins by introducing students to the theoretical perspectives and key bodies of literature on the nature of right wing extremism in contemporary Europe, and it explores the complex conceptual, analytical and terminological debates surrounding this subject of enquiry. It places particular emphasis on the politics of the far right in France, Germany and the United Kingdom after 1945. It engages in empirical investigations into the ideology and the electoral base of different right-wing extremist parties across Western Europe and, in so doing, it also examines the question of why some right-wing extremist parties have been electorally more successful than others. It finishes by exploring the impact that right-wing extremist parties have had on public debate, policy-making and party competition over the last 30 years and by considering how mainstream parties have attempted to counter the rise and growing influence of the parties of the extreme right.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will acquire knowledge of and engage with major debates within the literature on the far right. Students will be in a position to apply definitions and classifications of right-wing extremism to case studies so as to compare and contrast the ideologies right-wing extremist parties across Western Europe. Students will be able to identify and assess the reasons that explain why some right-wing extremist parties have been electorally more successful than others and be able assess the impact of right-wing extremism on public debate, policy-making and party competition across Western Europe and relate the academic study of right-wing extremism to questions of public and political concern.

        Skills

        Intellectual skills

        • Critical and independent thinking: the ability to think critically and to construct one’s own position/argument in relation to leading debates within the field
        • Synthesis of information: the skill of collecting, analyzing and synthesizing information from a variety of web and library sources via oral debates and written work.
        • Case study analysis: the knowledge and use of relevant case studies to illustrate, to support or to challenge key arguments and debates.


        Professional and career development skills

        • Communication skills: the ability to clearly communicate one’s position both orally and in writing.
        • Advocacy skills: the ability to present and sustain a convincing argument.

        Organizational skills

        • Preparatory skills: always being well prepared for tutorials (e.g. required reading)
        • Time management: effective use of study time, meeting coursework deadlines
        • Independent research: making good use of the library and the materials available

        Assessment

        Essay (30%), Group Work (60%), Participation and Attendance (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3056

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Political Parties and Elections in Northern Ireland
        Overview

        This module analyses political parties and elections in Northern Ireland. The module is motivated by the following simple question: What drives citizens’ party choice in Northern Ireland elections. The module situates the Northern Ireland case in the context of the international literature on political and electoral institutions. Specifically, given the consociational institutional context of Northern Ireland, what expectations should we have of how citizens choose parties at election time? The module assesses the relative importance of ‘conflict’ and ‘non conflict issues’ in determining voting behaviour.
        The following is an indicative description of the seminars

        1. Introduction
        2. The Institutional Context: Consocationalism
        3. Social Bases of Voting: Religion versus other effects
        4. Ideological Bases of Voting: Ethno-national ideology versus other ideological effects (economic left-right, liberal-conservative, pro-EU anti EU)
        5. Psychological identification: Positive Affective attachment versus negative identification
        6. Group representation: Tribune versus Catch-All effects
        7. Holding parties responsible for governing performance
        8. Parties from the South and the East: What would happen if...?
        9. Implications for other deeply divided places and consociational contexts

        Note that there will be an element of quantitative statistical analysis in this module. Students should be prepared for this.

        Learning Outcomes

        Understanding of the nature of party competition and electoral choice in Northern Ireland

        Skills

        Intellectual skills
        Understanding theoretical interpretations of political choice and understanding how theories are empiricallly tested


        Professional and career development skills

        Participation in seminars and knowledge of methodological matters

        Organizational skills

        Assignment completion

        Assessment

        Analysis of Data (35%), Essay (55%), Presentation (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3058

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • National and Ethnic Minorities in European Politics
        Overview

        Often trapped between the competing logics of nation and state, minority groups in Europe have played an important role in the twentieth century's bloodiest tragedies and have been targeted in many conflicts. However, contemporary Europe offers a substantial institutional approach to put minority issues on an entirely novel footing. This course looks at the role of minority groups in Europe addressing their competing claims over political representation, economic resources and cultural rights that persist throughout the Union. The course will examine minority issues from a comparative perspective to shed light on challenges that face specifically postcommunist European societies and will address issues pertaining to recognition of minority rights in the ‘older’ EU member states.

        We start with the analyses of the origins of minority rights, the establishment of the European minority rights regime, and the relationship between national minorities and majorities in contemporary Europe. The module will engage with issues on European minority rights agenda moving beyond the perspective of nation-state, and will focus upon the impact of both, social processes domestically and geopolitical considerations regionally to enhance understanding of complicated relationship between the human rights and non-discrimination agendas globally. It engages literature on postcommunist Europeanisation, minority rights regime and accommodation of rights of migrants during the complex path of building European institutions. Taking its starting point in theoretical debates of post-cold War minority protection in Europe, the module is focused empirically on European cases, East and West, where tensions between groups have been identified and examined in terms of ethnic and/or national identities. By contrasting the issue relevant for national minorities throughout Europe the course will allow greater understanding of consequences going in hand with the recognition of national minority rights for European societies with growing numbers of old and new minority communities.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:
        • Place minority situations in a broader context of domestic and European politics
        • Contrast the differential impact European integration had on minority groups in different waves of enlargement
        • Ascertain importance of national minorities as guarantors of geopolitical stability
        • Understand and be able to discriminate the impact of new and old minorities have on likelihood of ethnic conflict in contemporary Europe
        • Communicate clearly and concisely, both orally and in written form contemporary situation in Europe
        • Rigorously pursue intellectual questions in an academic manner, using analytical skills and critical thinking.

        Skills

        This module will assist in developing students’ skills in a number of important areas. These include:

        Intellectual skills
        • Analytical Thinking: identify, understand, interpret and evaluate relevant subject-specific arguments made by others; construct independent arguments
        • Critical & Independent Thinking: ability to think critically and construct one’s own position in relation to existing and ongoing debates in the field
        Professional and career development skills
        • Communication Skills: ability to communicate clearly with others, both orally and in writing
        • Teamwork: ability to work with others in a team, negotiate conflicts and recognize different ways of learning
        • Self-Reflexivity: ability to reflect on one’s own progress and identify and act upon ones own development needs with respect to life-long learning and career development
        Organizational skills
        • Clear organisation of information: show efficiency in the organisation of large amounts of complex information and the ability to identify, describe and analyse the key features of the information
        • Organisation and communication: demonstrate ability to use evidence to develop logical and clear argument; show aptitude for the effective use of information in a direct and appropriate way

        Assessment

        Case Study (35%), Essay (55%), Literature Review (10%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3059

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Challenges to contemporary party politics
        Overview

        This module focuses on two themes: party system change and the contemporary challenges that affect political parties. Why and how do new parties emerge? Why do old parties survive crises and new party challenges? Who joins political parties and how can we explain the decline in party membership? How can parties and their representatives be more representative of society at large? Should parties be funded through our taxes or private money? Do political parties make a difference in terms of public policy? These are some of the questions that will be addressed in this module.
        The module is comparative in nature, with a focus on European and North American countries, but discussions of other cases are welcome.
        Assessment is designed to hone the students’ presentation, writing, critical and knowledge-transfer skills: students make a presentation that is partly assessed through student peer evaluation, write a case-study report and a book review, and write a policy paper in which they advise a (fictional) political party on addressing a contemporary challenge (representation of women and minorities, party finance, or membership).
        Past students on this module have enjoyed the presentations and the advantages of peer assessment (making the presentation to the whole class, more focus on content and making a good presentation, and getting to exercise their critical skills through marking), as well as the relaxed style of the seminars and the ability to write a policy paper instead of an academic essay.

        Learning Outcomes

        Upon successful completion of the module, students will
         acquire knowledge of and engage with major debates within the literature on political parties, their interaction with other parties and their internal organisation;
         be able to identify and discuss the functions and roles played by political parties in modern representative democracies;
         be able to compare contexts of party and party system formation and forms of party organisation;
         be able to identify the challenges political parties currently face;
         use comparative qualitative and quantitative data to support arguments and evaluate relationships between variables/factors that contribute to explaining parties and party systems;
         develop and improve their skills in oral and written communication through seminar activities, presentations, essays and research papers, and feedback provided by the module convenor.

        Skills

        Intellectual skills

        • Managing and prioritizing knowledge: the skill of identifying relevant and subject-specific knowledge, sources and data and to manage such information in an independent manner;
        • Synthesis of information: the skill of collecting, analysing and synthesizing information from a variety of web and library sources via oral debates and written work.
        • Critical and independent thinking: the ability to think critically and to construct one’s own position/argument in relation to leading debates within the field;
        • Comparative analysis: the knowledge and use of relevant data from a range of cases to illustrate support or challenge key arguments and debates and evaluate hypotheses (the relationship between variables or factors) in the literature. Also the ability to select appropriate cases and methodology to answer research questions.

        Professional and career development skills

        • Communication skills: the ability to clearly communicate one’s position both orally and in writing;
        • Presentational and advocacy skills: the ability to present your ideas to a group of peers and sustain a convincing argument;
        • Evaluation skills: the ability to assess your peers’ work in an impartial fashion using a pre-determined set of criteria.

        Organizational skills

        • Preparatory skills: always being well prepared for tutorials (e.g. required reading)
        • Time management: effective use of study time, meeting coursework deadlines
        • Independent research: making good use of the library and the materials available

        Assessment

        - Portfolio: book review and case study report (1,500-2,000 words) 30%
        - Presentation (lecturer-and peer-assessed) 10%
        - Policy paper (2,500-3,000 words) 60%

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3067

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Arms Control
        Overview

        The module will introduce the student to arms control as a part of national security policy and strategy. The focus of the module is mainly on strategic arms control of the 20th Century and early 21st Century. The module focus is on nuclear arms control and the structures of world order. The Nuclear Non Proliferation regime will be the basis for the analysis of the arms limitation and arms reduction treaties of the 1970s to 2000s. The module will thus deal with SALT I, SALT II, with START, New START and the INF Treaty. The MBFR negotiations and CFE treaty will offer a bridge to the wider spectrum of arms control. Humanitarian arms control, biological and chemical arms control regimes and control or prohibition of space based weapons will also feature. The module will offer a classic and a critical introduction into arms control theory.

        Learning Outcomes

        NONE

        Skills

        NONE

        Assessment

        Essay (90%) and presentation (10%).

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3039

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Asylum and Migration in Global Politics
        Overview

        down many routes for asylum seekers, turning attention to security and border control concerns. Bilateral and multi-lateral relations are imbued with concerns about controlling the movement of people as states work with and respond not only to each other, but to non-governmental and international organizations. These dynamics are imbued with global power relations, with changing notions of security and with age-old questions of sovereignty, citizenship, and belonging. The dominant policy direction favours solutions that emphasize either preventative protection or repatriation, both practices of containment and conflict resolution and management. We are witnessing a decline in the traditional category of refugees, but a rise in the number of internally displaced persons. Economic deprivation and poverty continues to pair with conflict to drive migration that muddies the waters between “forced” and “voluntary” categories. Increasing incidents of human smuggling and human trafficking, and a failure in many circles to effectively distinguish between the two, are demanding new policy innovations that are linking international criminal law to diplomatic relations – and migrants are caught in the middle. Finally, emerging categories such as “environmental refugees” are challenging the current refugee regime, which remains rooted in the 1951 Convention.

        This module will examine these changes in the fields of refugee and migration studies, asking questions that assess not only shifting policy and practices but also the impacts these shifts have on the lived lives of migrants themselves. We will engage these questions and the issues they raise through thoughtful and critical dialogue. We will focus on the politics of migration and citizenship as dynamic practices rather than pre-determined institutions, and ask what roles the various structures and frameworks of contemporary International Relations play in these politics. Importantly, we will also ask what role individuals play, and examine the politics of voice and agency in both shaping, contesting and resisting state practices. To tackle these issues, we will engage with both policy and theoretical literatures and illustrate conceptual and philosophical arguments through extensive use of specific case studies from different regions of the world. We will emphasize contemporary and emerging issues, but also look at the historical contexts and questions that shape the politics of migration and citizenship as they exist today.

        Learning Outcomes

        none

        Skills

        none

        Assessment

        none

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3041

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Rise of Christianity 2: The Conversion of the Roman Empire
        Overview

        A study of the growth of the Christian community within the Roman world from the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem (AD 70) to the death of Constantine the Great (AD 337). Students will assess the variety and character of early Christian teaching; the appearance and definition of heresies; the literary interaction between the upholders of Roman religio and Christians; the nature and extent of persecution within the Roman empire; the conversion of Constantine the Great (c. AD 312) and its significance for the Roman empire.

        Learning Outcomes

        To understand the methods used for the resconstruction of an historical topic and acquire advanced perspectives of early Christianity in its Roman context.

        Skills

        Advanced development of skills of analysis and evaluation, in particular the organization and interpretation of widely scattered and frequently fragmentary source material.

        Assessment

        Coursework (60%), Assignment (30%), Participation (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3071

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Security and Technology
        Overview

        Security politics has long been associated with the development, use and regulation of new technologies, from the ‘nuclear revolution’ to contemporary practices of cyber-security and surveillance. This module focusses on the inter-relationships of technology and security, and seeks to develop advanced understanding of the complexities of the “technopolitics” of security. This includes both novel technologies and the mundane materialities of security (fences, walls, guns). It introduces students to the role and political significance of science and technology from different theoretical perspectives, from political realism to the contemporary ‘material turn’ in critical security studies. It seeks to engage students in contemporary political debates and practices that entangle science and technology and security politics which may include issues such as cyber-security, UAVs/Drones, disarmament, nuclear terrorism, critical infrastructure protection, technologies of killing, biotechnology, biometrics, surveillance, border control, food security, health and medical technologies, and technologies of (military) bodies, among others. The module incorporates both theoretical perspectives (including IR/Security theory, and wider philosophy of technology and Science, Technology and Society approaches) and in depth empirical material.

        Learning Outcomes

        Upon successful completion of the module students will:

        - Demonstrate an awareness and understanding of different theoretical understandings of science and technology in security politics and practice.
        - Be able to discuss in depth the politics of several key security technologies.
        - Critically engage in debates on key developments in the politics of security that relate to emerging technologies and technologically mediated forms of security practice.
        - Be able to reflect upon the ethical and political implications of technological developments and practices in relation to security.
        - Pursue independent, creative and critical thinking through both written work and group discussions.

        Skills

        Intellectual skills
        • Managing & Prioritizing Knowledge: identify relevant and subject-specific knowledge, sources and data; manage such information in an independent manner
        • Analytical Thinking: identify, understand, interpret and evaluate relevant subject-specific arguments made by others; construct independent arguments
        • Critical & Independent Thinking: ability to think critically and construct one’s own position in relation to existing and ongoing debates in the field

        Professional and career development skills
        • Communication Skills: ability to communicate clearly with others, both orally and in writing
        • Teamwork: ability to work with others in a team, negotiate conflicts and recognize different ways of learning
        • Diversity: ability to acknowledge and be sensitive to the range of cultural differences present in the learning environment
        • Self-Reflexivity: ability to reflect on one’s own progress and identify and act upon ones own development needs with respect to life-long learning and career development
        • Time Management: ability to negotiate diverse and competing pressures; cope with stress; and achieve a work / life balance

        Organizational skills
        • Efficient and effective work practice: demonstrate ability to work efficiently to deadlines
        • Clear organisation of information: show efficiency in the organisation of large amounts of complex information and the ability to identify, describe and analyse the key features of the information
        • Organisation and communication: demonstrate ability to use evidence to develop logical and clear arguments; show aptitude for the effective use of information in a direct and appropriate way
        • Enterprising thinking: Demonstrate ability to think and argue in novel and enterprising ways, to display originality of thought and argument and the ability to clearly support arguments in innovative ways

        Assessment

        35% Essay, 55% Portfolio, 10% Continuous Assessment

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3073

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Global Pol. Econ. of Energy
        Overview

        This module examines the role of natural resources in modern societies, with a particular focus on energy resources and how they have shaped international politics and economics. Specific topics include: the transition from coal to oil and the emerging role of the multinational energy corporations in international politics; the link between natural resources and development in the Global South; the nature and consequences of the ‘resource curse’; the geo-strategic implications of contestation over natural resources; a range of case studies, which may include the following: post-colonial petro-states in the Gulf of Guinea; the politics of land in Africa; the global impact of the US shale revolution; energy and authoritarianism in Russia and Venezuela; and the future of fossil fuels and the capitalist world order.

        Learning Outcomes

        By the end of this module, students will be able to identify key developments in the modern era of resource politics, and how domestic and international contestation over natural resources such as oil, gas, minerals and land have shaped global economic and political developments. Students will also be able to relate a range of topics and developments in global resource politics to other aspects of international politics and economics, including the emergence of the post-colonial world and the rising powers of the Global South, socio-economic development, international conflict and environmental sustainability.

        Skills

        Thinking conceptually and pursuing rigorous, systematic inquiry into various aspects of the political economy of natural resources in a global context; constructing lucid arguments that are theoretically and empirically informed, in both critical analysis and essay forms; presenting concise and clearly articulated oral arguments in a group setting. Intellectual skills development, including managing and prioritising knowledge, analytical thinking and critical and independent thinking. Professional and career development skills, including communication skills, self-reflexivity and time management. Organisational skills, including efficient and effective work practice, clear organisation of information, communication and enterprising thinking.

        Assessment

        Essay (55%), Essay (35%), Participation (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3012

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Placement
        Overview

        This module offers students the opportunity to undertake a work placement for a total of 1.5 days per week for 12 weeks (18 days in total) in a host organisation. Assessment will be via a reflective learning log, policy brief and academic case study. The module offers a hands-on, workplace-based learning opportunity in the participating institutions during which they will contribute to their employer’s work and undertake three pieces of assessed work.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will have significantly developed their administrative knowledge and capacity; acquired a clear understanding of the work, organisation and operation of the host institution; produced a body of work that is both academically sound and, ideally, of practical utility for the host institution; and developed and acquired a range of skills including working within a team setting and complying with the norms and ethical standards of a professional working environment. Students will also have learned to locate their applied experience with academic interests and concerns.

        Skills

        This module will assist in developing students’ skills in a number of important areas. These include:

        Intellectual skills
        • Managing & Prioritizing Knowledge
        • Analytical Thinking
        • Critical & Independent Thinking

        Professional and career development skills
        • Communication Skills
        • Teamwork
        • Diversity
        • Self-Reflexivity
        • Time Management

        Technical and practical skills
        • Information Technology
        • Regulations and standards

        Organizational skills
        • Efficient and effective work practice
        • Clear organisation of information
        • Organisation and communication
        • Enterprising thinking

        Assessment

        Attendance for 18 days total in host workplace organisation (e.g. Civil Service Department, NGO, consultancy firm)
        Submission of all three forms of assessment.
        Case Study (55%), Logbook (10%), Policy Paper (35%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        PAI3089

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        Yes

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Sin Cities? Everyday Life in the Modern Metropolis
        Overview

        What, when and - perhaps most importantly - where was modernity? Were cities merely the inactive sites or containers of emerging economic, social and cultural processes, or was urbanity a fundamental part of what it meant to be living in a ‘modern age’? ‘Sin Cities’ explores these questions through the study of metropolitan centres in the Western world between c.1880-1939. You will be taken through urban life in places such as London, New York, Paris and Berlin – and the pleasures, anxieties and identities that they came to represent.

        The course begins with the late-nineteenth century growth of both academic and popular belief in the idea that cities were now somehow different to what had come before – new, shocking, and possibly the end (or maybe the beginning?) of Western society. Following lectures and tutorials range widely across a diverse field of analytical approaches and topics, including: sexuality sub-cultures; shopping and entertainment; miscegenation and ‘slumming’; prostitution and ‘sexual danger’; and the rise of urban sociology. We will end the module by debating the importance of the ‘urban variable’, and its value as a distinct category of historical analysis.

        Learning Outcomes

        i) Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of urban history as a specific discipline.
        ii) Students will be able to critique the concept of ‘modernity’ in a Western framework.
        ii) Students will hone their capability to understand different theoretical approaches (gender, class, sexuality) relevant to social history more broadly.
        iv) Students will be able to understand the history of different countries in a comparative framework.

        Skills

        i) Students will enhance their ability to critically analyse different primary sources in connection with secondary literature.
        ii) Students will increase their confidence and ability to orally present analysis and argument, working in groups.
        iii) Students will increase their ability to organise and synthesise secondary literature in a coherent argument.

        Assessment

        Critical Review (30%), Essay (60%), Tutorial Contribution (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3128

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Ancient City
        Overview

        This module considers the ancient Greco-Roman city as a dynamic form of settlement, from its origins in archaic Greece to its demise (or transformation) in the late antique West. Our readings will include ancient discussions of the political and economic roles of cities and of urban architecture and design, as well as depictions in prose and poetry of everyday life in imperial Rome and classical Athens. We will also examine the material remains of these two ancient “mega-cities” and of the smaller but well-preserved cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum. We will attempt to formulate our own definition(s) of the ancient city, and we will trace changes in the organization and uses of urban space, and in ancient writers’ conceptions of the political, social, economic, and religious roles of cities, over the course of classical antiquity.

        Learning Outcomes

        - An understanding of the historical and geographical diversity of ancient Mediterranean urbanism.
        - An ability to recognize and evaluate historical debates (both ancient and modern) relating to the development of the Greco-Roman city.
        - An ability to evaluate the wide range of textual and material-cultural evidence pertaining to the Greco-Roman city.

        Skills

        - The ability to engage with historical interpretations and to judge between them, both orally and in written form.
        - The ability to evaluate the strengths and limitations of diverse primary and secondary sources.
        - The ability to locate relevant sources and to construct a consistent written argument from them.
        - The confidence to discuss, present and articulate arguments to peers.

        Assessment

        Essay (60%), Coursework (30%), Participation (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3129

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Twentieth-Century China
        Overview

        This module examines the last century for the most populous country in the world. During that period China experienced far-reaching changes and after a long submission period to the Western powers reaffirmed its central role on the global stage. In terms of political structures, there was a move from empire to republic, and then from a right wing to a left wing mono party rule. In that regard, the century can be split into before and after World War Two, when the leadership of the country was first in the hands of the Chinese Nationalist Party led by Sun Yatsen and then Chiang Kaishek, and since 1949 by the Chinese Communist Party led by Mao Zedong, then Deng Xiaoping and his successors. The twentieth century for China also witnessed epochal changes regarding society and culture, including the New Cultural Movement, the May Four Movement, the emancipation of women, and opposition to Confucian values. The course also presents the intricate foreign policy, which passed from a tributary system, to Japanese occupation, to a central player of the Cold War in Asia, and to a central player in the globalized world of today.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
        • Demonstrate detailed knowledge and understanding of the political and social changes of twentieth-century Chinese history.
        • Confidently evaluate a range of relevant historiographical debates and approaches.
        • Analyse and evaluate in translation a variety of primary sources drawn from across the period.
        • Evaluate evidence for continuity and change across the period, and compare regional variations.

        Skills

        • Students will improve their ability to engage with and critique a variety of historical interpretations.
        • Students will develop their ability to identify and locate primary and secondary sources and to exploit them in constructing sustained and coherent arguments.
        • Students will enhance their self-confidence, team-working and oral and written communication skills by engaging in group discussions, making presentations, and submitting written work.

        Assessment

        Essay: 60%
        Assignment: 30%
        Tutorial Participation: 10%

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3132

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Paths to Independence and Decolonisation in India and East Africa
        Overview

        This module explores different, yet interconnected, paths towards independence in India and East Africa. On the surface the Independence movements in India, Kenya and Tanzania have little in common. India became independent in 1947, Tanzania in 1961 and Kenya in 1963. Leaving aside the partition of British India into what is today India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, independence for the subcontinent was already being discussed since about the First World War, whereas Kenya saw the emergence of a strong majority national movement only after the Second World War. However, there existed cultural and political connections between the Indian Subcontinent and East Africa which played a significant role in the struggle for independence in these regions. This course aims at illuminating the circulation of political ideas and the way in which they acquired specific meaning in local contexts. Moreover, the course highlights the importance of South-South connections in the making of the modern nation-state in Asia and Africa. Students will be expected to engage with a range of interdisciplinary sources such as governmental reports, political tracts, film documentaries, oral testimony and fiction.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
        Acquired knowledge and informed understanding of nationalist movements in Asia and Africa, their specific characteristics, and the connections and links between the countries studied.
        Analyzed and discussed a wide range of source materials.
        Confidently evaluate a range of relevant historiographical debates and approaches.
        Analyse a multiplicity of primary sources.
        Evaluate evidence for continuity and change across the period, and compare regional variations.

        Skills

        Students will improve their ability to engage with and critique a variety of historical interpretations.
        Students will develop their ability to identify and locate primary and secondary sources and to exploit them in constructing sustained and coherent arguments.
        Students will enhance their self-confidence, team-working and oral and written communication skills by engaging in group discussions, making presentations, and submitting written work.

        Assessment

        Essay: 70%
        Assignment: 20%
        Tutorial Presentation: 10%

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3133

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Long Sexual Revolution: Family Life in Western Europe, 1945-1970s
        Overview

        Twentieth century Europe saw deep and far reaching transformations in the history of the family: sexuality, love, gender relations and marriage were all sharply redefined by war, politics and socio-economic change. While this story might seem on the surface to be a straightforward one of progress and increasing personal liberation, this module will show how such developments were equally beset by anxiety, uncertainty and reaction. Totalitarian regimes attempted to shape the bodies and emotions of their people as part of their projects to mould men and women to their political projects, while both religious authorities and democratic societies were often preoccupied with the sexual morality of their citizens, particularly in times of social change. Paradoxically while sexuality, love and relationships came to be seen increasingly as matters of private rather than family or community concern over the course of the century, they also became of greater public and state interest. This module will investigate the history of the intimate sphere in twentieth century western and southern Europe, examining how gender, sexuality and family have intersected with European politics, society and culture over the course of the last century, from the end of the Second World War and the social upheaval that it brought to the era of apparent sexual liberation in the 1970s.

        The national case studies that we examine are Italy, West Germany, France, Spain and Britain. Beginning in the 1950s we will explore the rise of the companionate marriage, investigating how the new focus on marriage for love was shaped both by the war and by the rise of mass culture. We will also examine how the sexual and emotional self was shaped by politics and ideology, looking particularly at the strong communist subcultures in post-war France and Italy. In turning to the 1960s, we will examine how the Pill shaped gender and sexual relations, before turning to the fracturing of mass culture with the rise of protest cultures, counter cultures and the feminist and gay rights movements of the 1970s. In doing so we will discuss how the 1960s revolutionised sexual and gender relations, as well as exploring both the limits and darker aspects of these developments. The limits of the narrative of twentieth century sexual liberation will be explored and discussed in relation to gender and honour in Mediterranean society.

        The primary sources that will be used will be drawn in particular from the mass media (incl. visual, textual and audiovisual) as well as from personal testimony(incl. the oral history database of the ‘Around 68’ project, and interviews about homosexuality in West Germany).

        Seminar topics might include:

        The 1950s I: The end of war, romance and marriage in Britainand Germany
        The 1950s II: Religion, reaction and ‘normality’ in post-war Italy
        The politics of love: Communism and sexuality in France and Italy
        Between reaction, religion and modernisation: Sexual politics in 1950s and 1960s Franco’s Spain
        Changing definitions of marriage and love I: The companionate marriage(Britain as case study)
        Changing definitions of marriage and love II: The commercialization of romance(Britain and France)
        ‘Je suis libre’? Sexuality in the 1960s between myth and reality
        The pill in Catholic Europe: From 1960 to Humanae Vitae
        ‘A revolutionary’s steak takes as long to be done as a bourgeois’ steak’: 1968 and the limits of sexual liberty
        Honour, gender relations and sexuality in southern Europe: Spain and Italy
        Second wave feminism: France and Italy

        Learning Outcomes

        The aims of this module are to:

        Explore a variety of approaches to the history of sexuality and the emotions, as they apply to late twentieth century Europe.

        Examine the history of sexuality, emotions and family in twentieth century Europe as it intersects with cultural, social and political developments in history from the impact of World War II, the rise of consumer society, developments in medicine and technology, and the rise of youth cultures, counter cultures and protest movements.

        Explore the rise of the companionate marriage in post-war society and the significance of romantic love in late twentieth century society and culture.·Examine and analyse how both culture and religion have shaped differing attitudes towards female sexuality, particularly in relation to honour both in southern Europe and more recently in migrant communities.

        Prompt reflection and debate about how such personal attributes as human sexuality, emotions and the body can become much broader social concerns, particularly with the increasing focus on individual happiness in post-war Western society.

        Knowledge and Understanding

        Having successfully completed the module, you will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

        The different approaches to the modern history of sexuality and the emotions.
        Debates about the history of love, sexuality and family and how they intersected with broader political, social and cultural developments in European history from the Second World War to the end of the twentieth century.

        The different sources that can be used to examine the history of emotions and sexuality, from diaries, memoirs and manifestos to fiction and documentary and advice manuals, and for the late twentieth century in particular mass media sources such as film and magazines.

        How sexuality and love became commercialised in Western society from the 1950s onwards with the rise of mass culture and the implications of these developments.

        How and why ‘personal’ matters of sexuality became political in the feminist and gay rights movements from the 1970s onwards.

        How a knowledge of the differing attitudes towards sexuality and love as shaped by politics, religion and culture over the course of the last century might enrich our understanding of these issues in the contemporary world.

        Skills

        Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

        Explain and discuss the different approaches to the history of sexuality and love and how these can be applied to late twentieth century Europe.

        Analyse and discuss a wide variety of primary sources that can be used to approach the history of sexuality and the emotions.

        Critically evaluate and discuss how different historical themes such as the rise of mass culture intersect with the history of sexuality and the emotions.

        Evaluate critically the different ways in which historians of twentieth century Europe have approached these thematic and methodological issues.

        Be able to make connections and draw contrasts across time and space in terms of experiences, reactions and approaches to sexuality and emotions in late twentieth century European history.

        Explain and defend your own views on debates and key developments in the history of sexuality and the emotions in late twentieth century Europe.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3023

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Diaspora: Irish 19th-century migration
        Overview

        This module investigates the making of the Irish diaspora; explores factors that led unprecedented numbers of Irish migrants to permanently leave the country of their birth in the course of the 19th century and comparatively assesses the often challenging experiences of Irish migrants in the leading host societies of Britain, the United States and Australia. It also assesses the Irish migrant outflow against the backdrop of European migration to ascertain the distinctive features of Irish 19th-century migration. Course contents: Week 1 Introduction to migration history Week 2 The Scattering: the Irish case study Week 3 The key features of a diaspora Week 4 Pre-famine migratory patterns Week 5 Famine migration Week 6 Post-famine migration Week 7 Women and Irish migration Week 8 Host society analysis I: Britain Week 9 Host society analysis II: The United States Week 10 Host society analysis III: Australia - convict migration Week 11 Host society analysis IV: Australia - free settler migration

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will:

        In Understand the social and economic conditions in Ireland, and in recipient countries over the course of a century; Comprehend why people leave their country of birth; the difficulties and prejudices they often face in their new homelands; and the impact of migration on the place of birth and to the place of destination; Develop a wider and deeper understanding of the experience of Irish migration and the historical debates that surround the Irish diaspora; Understand the occupational and residential distribution of Irish migrants, paying particular attention to regional diversity and gender difference; An Be aware of the comparative aspect of migration studies; AN Be able to investigate migration in a rigorous academic manner Co Communicate historical arguments effectively both orally and in writing Have knowledge of Irish immigrants’ political, cultural and religious affiliation and the complex and problematic questions of ethnic identity, ethnic fade and attitudes to migrant populations which are issues of considerable contemporary resonance.

        Skills

        Managing and Prioritising Knowledge: identify relevant and subject-specific knowledge, sources and data; manage such information in an independent manner Analytical Thinking: identify, understand, interpret and evaluate relevant subject-specific arguments made by others; construct independent arguments Critical and Independent Thinking: ability to think critically and construct one’s own position in relation to existing and ongoing debates in the field professional and career development skills Communication Skills: ability to communicate clearly with others, both orally and in writing Diversity: ability to acknowledge and be sensitive to the range of cultural differences present in the learning environment Self-Reflexivity: ability to reflect on one’s own progress and identify and act upon one’s own development needs with respect to life-long learning and career development Time Management: ability to negotiate diverse and competing pressures; cope with stress; and achieve a work / life balance Practical and technical skills: demonstrate the knowledge and ability to use contemporary and relevant ICT/historical databases/online archival resources. Organisational skills: Efficient and effective work practice: demonstrate ability to work efficiently to deadlines Clear organisation of information: show efficiency in the organisation of large amounts of complex information and the ability to identify, describe and analyse the key features of the information Organisation and communication: demonstrate ability to use evidence to develop logical and clear arguments; show ability for the effective use of information in a direct and appropriate way Enterprising thinking: Demonstrate ability to think and argue in novel and enterprising ways, to display originality of thought and argument and the ability to clearly support arguments by the use of historical evidence

        Assessment

        NONE

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3137

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Extermination: History and Memory of the Murdered Jews of Europe
        Overview

        This is a final-year UG taught module devoted to the destruction of European Jewry during the Second World War. The module will treat separately the following components of the history and memory of an event often referred to as the Holocaust or Shoah, but here called “the Extermination”: 1. The origins of the Jewish peoples some 5,000 years ago and their eventual settlement in North Africa and Europe near the end of the Ancient period. 2. The flowering of Jewish culture in the Middle Ages and Early Modern periods. 3. The growth of antisemitism and anti-Jewish pogroms across Europe from the late 19th C., spawning successive waves of emigration. 4. The peculiar qualities of Nazified antisemitism in Germany from 1933, included the piecemeal and soon wholesale denial of civil rights for German Jews. 5. Wartime escalation of the persecution of Jews, both in Germany and across occupied Europe. 6. The transition to ghettoization, and then extermination, resulting in the murder of six million Jewish persons by spring 1945. 7. The implication in the Extermination of a wide array of collaborators beyond Nazi Germans, including bystanders, neighbors, neutral governments and the Allies. 8. Post-1945 memory wars, stalled attempts at reparations and restitutions, and the creation of public history research centers and memorials. 9. The struggles to represent the Extermination, on the stage, in the cinema, on the page and in other media. 10. The more recent biological imperative for historians to reinvent Holocaust Studies as the last wartime survivors and eyewitnesses die out.

        Learning Outcomes

        * an understanding of the destruction of the Jews of Europe between 1939 and 1945, in the context of previous and later historical developments * knowledge of a variety of historical sources from this period, including official documents and the press, memoirs, novels, films and images, as well as with secondary materials and historiographical debates appearing books and articles * knowledge of the wartime European political regimes and their ideologies that gave rise to exterminationist antisemitism * an understanding of the outlook and experiences of various sectors of Jewish society over the course of WWII, including women and children * an understanding of the post-war emergence of Holocaust studies and the various ways that the Extermination was remembered, memorialised, but also trivialised and falsified * an appreciation of the depths of the problems of representation, on the screen and on the page, as well as in other forms of representation * an understanding of the key role of survivor testimonies in creating narratives of the Extermination, and the current crises of transition to a post-survivor re-invention of Holocaust studies.

        Skills

        * to promote the development of key skills required to study history effectively * the ability to identify and select information relevant to the topic area from a variety of sources * the ability to analyse and evaluate evidence and argument * the ability to present your own arguments in essays, using appropriate evidence to support your views * the ability to work effectively within a group, making appropriate contributions to discussions, debates and tasks, as well as contributing and presenting a small group presentation * to hone public speaking skills and confidence, through discussions, debates and presentations

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3139

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Surviving the Victorian city: poverty, welfare and public health in nineteenth-century Belfast
        Overview

        Using Belfast as a case study, this module will explore the dichotomy between industrial and economic growth and the poverty and disease that accompanied it with the emergence of the industrial city in nineteenth-century Ireland and Britain. We will examine the social conditions that accompanied industrialisation and urbanisation and the experiences of the poorest in society as they sought to survive the city. We will seek to understand the various factors that led families into destitution, the ways in which they sought to get by, and how they engaged with welfare authorities and the workhouse as a last resort. We will also examine societal attitudes towards poverty and disease and explore the attempts by welfare and civic authorities to tackle these. There will be an emphasis on the role of the poor law in health and welfare in the latter half of the century, and a focus on the experience of specific groups such as women, children, and the sick.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will identify the main factors that drove Belfast’s urban and industrial growth during the nineteenth century and will be able to place this in the wider context of both Ireland and Britain. They will understand the social consequences of rapid urbanisation and the challenges around poverty and public health that this presented, and will engage with historiographical debates around poverty and welfare in the nineteenth-century city. They will develop a clear understanding of the poor law and how it operated in the nineteenth-century city.

        They will critically examine a range of primary sources, examining how these can be approached in order to uncover attitudes towards poverty and the poor and the ways in which society sought to address poverty, destitution and disease. In particular students will become familiar with the types of sources that can help uncover the lived experiences of the poorest in society.

        Skills

        Students will improve their critical skills and their ability to engage with historiographical debates. They will develop their ability to locate and use a range of primary sources and to apply these appropriately to independent historical research Students will develop their communication skills, understanding and articulating complex ideas in a variety of written forms, and engaging in discussion and debate over a range of issues.

        Assessment

        Essay (60%) Research task (30%) Tutorial participation (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3140

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Exceptional Origins of the American Republic
        Overview

        The Italian Renaissance statesman, political philosopher and historian Niccolò Machiavelli is best known for his treatise The Prince. Machiavelli’s creation of the archetype of the autocratic ruler has been admired by countless statesmen, historians and political scientists ever since.

        It may therefore come as a surprise that the righteous “New World” Founders of the American Republic were almost without exception devoted followers of the “Old World” Machiavellian Prince. John Adams, for one, confessed that he was a keen “student” of Machiavelli, dubbing him “the restorer of true politics,” and a man who had brought about a “revival of reason in matters of government.” Needless to say, this poses some awkward questions around what Adams lovingly described as “Our pure, virtuous, public spirited federative Republick.”

        But Machiavelli was not the only political thinker the American Founders turned to for ideas about how to build a new Republic that would withstand the test of time. In fact, they read just about every author who had written on the rise and fall of states. This poses a range of intriguing historical, political and constitutional questions. For if the nation state that the Americans cobbled together from examples they had found in previous philosophers, political historians and other writers, then how did they come up with the idea for an America that was ‘exceptional’ and hence unique among modern nations?

        In this module we will be exploring America’s supposedly “exceptional” liberal tradition, destined by God himself to thrive for ever in a Republic beyond the reach of despotism, in which governments exists solely because they derive “their just powers from the consent of the governed.” And yet for many outside America, it is a nation that is socially, racially, economically, politically, ecologically, and morally broken. That said, America put humans on the moon (surely for some good reason) and relieved the world of many a dictator (though often not for legitimate reasons). And those who like to take aim at America’s social deprivation and capitalist greed, need to explain why socialism never even came close to getting a foothold in the country.

        In this module we will be looking at how the nation that arose from the American Revolution and subsequently put its undisputable mark on the course of history (for better or for worse), comes across to many non-Americans as a phenomenon that is self-contradictory, if not wholly irrational. For that reason, this module sits at the confluence of political idealism and historical experience. Methodologically, the topic is wedged between the history of ideas and what may be described the history of fact or event.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will:


        • Be able to integrate the history and politics of the US within world historical, political and cultural developments, particularly within a transatlantic context
        • Be able to recognize recognize the key social and political events that marked the settlement of the Americas and the creation of the United States
        • have gained an understanding of the processes of colonization, nationhood, and identity formation in the context of the America
        • will be able to negotiate the different disciplinary aims and methodologies of the history of ideas and history proper
        • will have an understanding of the interdependent relation between a nation’s—notably America—ideas and ideologies on the one hand, and historical event and experience on the other

        Skills

        • are able to use primary sources in fashioning arguments
        • are able to analyze and interpret historiographical, literary, sociopolitical and philosophical sources as well as cultural artefacts
        • can make constructive contributions to class discussions and reproduce relevant material under exam conditions
        • have some grasp of how to situate their own interpretations of this period in a broader historiographical fabric have improved oral and writing skills
        • Students will learn to build these sources first into their essay, and then into their take-home exam essays.

        Assessment

        1. Three reflective commentaries (30%)
        2. Take-home exam/essay (60%)
        3. Tutorial ans seminar contribution (10%)

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        10%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        HIS3142

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

  • Entry Requirements

    Entrance requirements

    A level requirements
    ABB

    A maximum of one BTEC/OCR Single Award or AQA Extended Certificate will be accepted as part of an applicant's portfolio of qualifications with a Distinction* being equated to grade A at A-Level and a Distinction being equated to a grade B at A-level.
    Irish leaving certificate requirements
    H3H3H3H3H3H3/H2H3H3H3H3
    Access Course
    Successful completion of Access Course with an average of 70%.
    International Baccalaureate Diploma
    33 points overall, including 6,5,5 at Higher Level
    BTEC Level 3 Extended/National Extended Diploma
    QCF BTEC Extended Diploma (180 credits at Level 3) with overall grades D*DD

    RQF BTEC National Extended Diploma (1080 GLH at Level 3) with overall grades D*DD
    Graduate
    A minimum of a 2:2 Honours Degree
    All applicants
    There are no specific subject requirements to study History and International Studies.

    Selection Criteria

    In addition, to the entrance requirements above, it is essential that you read our guidance below on 'How we choose our students' prior to submitting your UCAS application.

    Applications are dealt with centrally by the Admissions and Access Service rather than by individual University Schools. Once your on-line form has been processed by UCAS and forwarded to Queen's, an acknowledgement is normally sent within two weeks of its receipt at the University.

    Selection is on the basis of the information provided on your UCAS form. Decisions are made on an ongoing basis and will be notified to you via UCAS.

    For entry last year, applicants for this degree offering A-Level/ BTEC Level 3 qualifications or equivalent must have had, or been able to achieve, a minimum of 5 GCSE passes at grade C/4 or better (to include English Language). The Selector will check that any specific entry requirements in terms of GCSE and/or A-level subjects can be fulfilled.

    Offers are normally made on the basis of 3 A-levels. Two subjects at A-level plus two at AS would also be considered. The offer for repeat applicants is set in terms of 3 A-levels and may be one grade higher than that asked from first time applicants. Grades may be held from the previous year.

    Applicants offering two A-levels and one BTEC Subsidiary Diploma/National Extended Certificate (or equivalent qualification), or one A-level and a BTEC Diploma/National Diploma (or equivalent qualification) will also be considered. Offers will be made in terms of the overall BTEC grade(s) awarded. Please note that a maximum of one BTEC Subsidiary Diploma/National Extended Certificate (or equivalent) will be counted as part of an applicant’s portfolio of qualifications. The normal GCSE profile will be expected.

    For applicants offering Irish Leaving Certificate, please note that performance at Irish Junior Certificate is taken into account. Applicants must have a minimum of 5 IJC grades C/ Merit. The Selector also checks that any specific entry requirements in terms of Leaving Certificate subjects can be satisfied.

    For applicants offering a HNC, the current requirements are successful completion of the HNC with 2 Distinctions and remainder Merits. For those offering a Higher National Diploma, some flexibility may be allowed in terms of GCSE profile but, to be eligible for an offer, the grades obtained in the first year of the HND must allow the overall offer to be achievable. The current entrance requirements are successful completion of the HND with 2 Distinctions, 10 Merits and 4 Passes overall. Any consideration would be for Stage 1 entry only.

    The information provided in the personal statement section and the academic reference together with predicted grades are noted but, in the case of BA degrees, these are not the final deciding factors in whether or not a conditional offer can be made. However, they may be reconsidered in a tie break situation in August.

    A-level General Studies and A-level Critical Thinking would not normally be considered as part of a three A-level offer and, although they may be excluded where an applicant is taking 4 A-level subjects, the grade achieved could be taken into account if necessary in August/September.

    Applicants are not normally asked to attend for interview, though there are some exceptions and specific information is provided with the relevant subject areas.

    If you are made an offer then you may be invited to a Faculty/School Open Day, which is usually held in the second semester. This will allow you the opportunity to visit the University and to find out more about the degree programme of your choice and the facilities on offer. It also gives you a flavour of the academic and social life at Queen's.

    If you cannot find the information you need here, please contact the University Admissions Service (admissions@qub.ac.uk), giving full details of your qualifications and educational background.

    International Students

    Our country/region pages include information on entry requirements, tuition fees, scholarships, student profiles, upcoming events and contacts for your country/region. Use the dropdown list below for specific information for your country/region.

    English Language Requirements

    An IELTS score of 6.5 with a minimum of 5.5 in each test component or an equivalent acceptable qualification, details of which are available at: http://go.qub.ac.uk/EnglishLanguageReqs

    If you need to improve your English language skills before you enter this degree programme, INTO Queen's University Belfast offers a range of English language courses. These intensive and flexible courses are designed to improve your English ability for admission to this degree.

    • Academic English: an intensive English language and study skills course for successful university study at degree level
    • Pre-sessional English: a short intensive academic English course for students starting a degree programme at Queen's University Belfast and who need to improve their English.

    International Students - Foundation and International Year One Programmes

    INTO Queen's offers a range of academic and English language programmes to help prepare international students for undergraduate study at Queen's University. You will learn from experienced teachers in a dedicated international study centre on campus, and will have full access to the University's world-class facilities.

    These programmes are designed for international students who do not meet the required academic and English language requirements for direct entry.

    INTO - English Language Course(QSIS ELEMENT IS EMPTY)

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    Careers

  • Careers

    Career Prospects

    Introduction
    We regularly consult and develop links with a large number of employers, including NI government departments and the North/South Ministerial Council, who provide sponsorship for our internships.

    In addition, the School offers a range of employment placements where students can gain real world work experience which is invaluable in terms of employment after graduation. Given that Belfast is a regional capital with devolved powers, we can offer students placements in the high profile political and related institutions on our doorstep - for example in the Department of Justice, Equality Commission, Police Ombudsman’s Office, or BBC Northern Ireland.

    Employment after the Course
    Skills to enhance employability
    Graduates from this degree at Queen’s are well regarded by local, national and international employers and over half of all graduate jobs are now open to graduates of any discipline, including History and International Relations.

    Studying for a History degree at Queen‘s will assist students in developing the core skills and employment-related experiences that are valued by graduate employers. Our modules are designed to enhance skills such as research, workload planning and management, presentational expertise, fluent literacy, close analysis, and the synthesis of competing arguments or evidence. Although the majority of our graduates are interested in pursuing careers in the public and voluntary/community sectors, significant numbers develop careers in the private sector, working in industries from management consultancy to law and journalism.

    Graduates in History from QUB pursue careers in areas such as:
    • Marketing
    • Journalism
    • Broadcasting
    • Research
    • Heritage
    • museum sector
    • education
    • the Civil Service
    • banking
    • accountancy
    • public relations
    • local government itself.

    Alumni Success
    Various serving politicians have studied in the School, including Ian Paisley Jr (MP), the Green Party Leader, Stephen Agnew, and ministers in the Northern Ireland Executive.

    Additional Awards Gained(QSIS ELEMENT IS EMPTY)

    Prizes and Awards(QSIS ELEMENT IS EMPTY)

    Degree plus award for extra-curricular skills

    In addition to your degree programme, at Queen's you can have the opportunity to gain wider life, academic and employability skills. For example, placements, voluntary work, clubs, societies, sports and lots more. So not only do you graduate with a degree recognised from a world leading university, you'll have practical national and international experience plus a wider exposure to life overall. We call this Degree Plus. It's what makes studying at Queen's University Belfast special.

  • Fees and Funding

    Tuition Fees

    Northern Ireland (NI) 1 £4,630
    Republic of Ireland (ROI) 2 £4,630
    England, Scotland or Wales (GB) 1 £9,250
    EU Other 3 £18,800
    International £18,800

    1 EU citizens in the EU Settlement Scheme, with settled status, will be charged the NI or GB tuition fee based on where they are ordinarily resident. Students who are ROI nationals resident in GB will be charged the GB fee.

    2 EU students who are ROI nationals resident in ROI are eligible for NI tuition fees.

    3 EU Other students (excludes Republic of Ireland nationals living in GB, NI or ROI) are charged tuition fees in line with international fees.

    All tuition fees quoted relate to a single year of study unless stated otherwise. The NI and ROI fees relate to academic year 2022-23 and will be updated to 2023-24 rates once they have been confirmed. All fees will be subject to an annual inflationary increase, unless explicitly stated otherwise.

    NI, GB and ROI fees for 2022 entry will be published soon. International fees for 2022 entry can be viewed here: www.qub.ac.uk/International/International-students/International-tuition-fees

    Tuition fee rates are calculated based on a student’s tuition fee status and generally increase annually by inflation. How tuition fees are determined is set out in the Student Finance Framework.

    Additional course costs

    All Students

    Depending on the programme of study, there may be extra costs which are not covered by tuition fees, which students will need to consider when planning their studies.

    Students can borrow books and access online learning resources from any Queen's library.

    If students wish to purchase recommended texts, rather than borrow them from the University Library, prices per text can range from £30 to £100. A programme may have up to 6 modules per year, each with a recommended text.  

    Students should also budget between £30 to £75 per year for photocopying, memory sticks and printing charges.  

    Students undertaking a period of work placement or study abroad, as either a compulsory or optional part of their programme, should be aware that they will have to fund additional travel and living costs.

    If a final year includes a major project or dissertation, there may be costs associated with transport, accommodation and/or materials. The amount will depend on the project chosen. There may also be additional costs for printing and binding.

    Students may wish to consider purchasing an electronic device; costs will vary depending on the specification of the model chosen.

    There are also additional charges for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines.

    History and International Relations costs

    In Year 2 students can apply for a number of optional history exchanges with institutions in the USA. The cost will vary depending on the institution and length of exchange and can range from £500 - £6,000.

    Students are responsible for funding travel, accommodation and subsistence costs.

    How do I fund my study?

    There are different tuition fee and student financial support arrangements for students from Northern Ireland, those from England, Scotland and Wales (Great Britain), and those from the rest of the European Union.

    Information on funding options and financial assistance for undergraduate students is available at www.qub.ac.uk/Study/Undergraduate/Fees-and-scholarships/.

    Scholarships

    Each year, we offer a range of scholarships and prizes for new students. Information on scholarships available.

    International Scholarships

    Information on scholarships for international students, is available at www.qub.ac.uk/International/International-students/International-scholarships/.

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  • Apply

    How and when to Apply

    How to Apply

    Application for admission to full-time undergraduate and sandwich courses at the University should normally be made through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS). Full information can be obtained from the UCAS website at: www.ucas.com/students.

    When to Apply

    UCAS will start processing applications for entry in autumn 2023 from 1 September 2022.

    Advisory closing date: 25 January 2023 (18:00). This is the 'equal consideration' deadline for this course.

    Applications from UK and EU (Republic of Ireland) students after this date are, in practice, considered by Queen’s for entry to this course throughout the remainder of the application cycle (30 June 2023) subject to the availability of places.

    Applications from International and EU (Other) students are normally considered by Queen’s for entry to this course until 30 June 2023. If you apply for 2023 entry after this deadline, you will automatically be entered into Clearing.

    Applicants are encouraged to apply as early as is consistent with having made a careful and considered choice of institutions and courses.

    The Institution code name for Queen's is QBELF and the institution code is Q75.

    Further information on applying to study at Queen's is available at: www.qub.ac.uk/Study/Undergraduate/How-to-apply/

    Apply via UCAS

    Terms and Conditions

    The terms and conditions that apply when you accept an offer of a place at the University on a taught programme of study. Queen's University Belfast Terms and Conditions.

    Additional Information for International (non-EU) Students

    1. Applying through UCAS
      Most students make their applications through UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service) for full-time undergraduate degree programmes at Queen's. The UCAS application deadline for international students is 30 June 2023.
    2. Applying direct
      The Direct Entry Application form is to be used by international applicants who wish to apply directly, and only, to Queen's or who have been asked to provide information in advance of submitting a formal UCAS application. Find out more.
    3. Applying through agents and partners
      The University’s in-country representatives can assist you to submit a UCAS application or a direct application. Please consult the Agent List to find an agent in your country who will help you with your application to Queen’s University.

    Download a prospectus

    Keywords

    HISTORY

    INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

    INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

    IR

    POLITICS

Register your interest
Course Vacancy Status

Below is the current vacancy status for this course. For further information please contact us.

Student Type
Places available?
NI and RoI Students
GB Students
International and EU (not RoI) Students