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Law with French (M2R1)

LLB|Undergraduate

Law (Major) with French

Entry year
Academic Year 2023/24
Entry requirements
AAA
Duration
4 years (Full Time)
UCAS code
M2R1
Placement Year
Yes
  • Overview

    This is a fully integrated programme between Law and French. You will study the Law of Northern Ireland as well as aspects of French Law.

    The degree includes a year abroad which provides a unique opportunity for linguistic development. In a globalised workforce proficiency in an additional language, together with the experience of studying abroad, significantly enhances your employability.

    Law (Major) with French Degree highlights

    Law at QUB was ranked 8th in the UK for Graduate prospects with the Times Good University Guide 2022 and 18th in the UK for Law with the Complete University Guide 2022.

    Global Opportunities

    • Students spend an academic year studying French at a university in France or Belgium. This significantly enhances the employability of students and the global opportunities open to them.

    Professional Accreditations

    • The degree offers students the opportunity to study the modules required for the academic stage of legal qualification. In addition, students are offered the opportunity to explore their interests in final year with modules offered that allow them to specialise in a particular area, or simply receive a more rounded sense of what ‘Law’ is. Many of these modules consider law and law-like interactions on a local, national and international level.

    Industry Links

    • Law students have the unique opportunity of working with industry leaders through commercial awareness events and other negotiation exercises that offer insight into the legal practice (and services) world but also provide an enhanced skills development experience.
    • The Law School at Queen's has a well-established tradition of regular consultation with legal professional bodies and top international law firms that is very beneficial for students.

    Career Development

    • Past students have gained work placement with organisations such as the Council of the EU, European Commission, European Parliament, United Nations (UN), Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), Council of Europe, and Thomson Reuters.

    World Class Facilities

    • The £20m School at Queen’s offers students access to world-class facilities such as a fully interactive Moot Court room, a One Button Recording Studio and a wellbeing room.

      Queen’s has an excellent library with an outstanding range of resources in French and Francophone cultures. The Language Centre has state-of-the-art facilities for language learning, and the IT provision more generally is excellent.

    Internationally Renowned Experts

    • Students in the School of Law are taught by world leading experts in the areas of Law, Human Rights, Criminology and Socio-Legal Studies. Our staff have close research links with the professions, government and Civil Society. Research in Law was ranked joint 4th in the UK for research impact (REF 2014).

      French at Queen’s is taught by world-leading experts in French and Francophone Culture, with particular expertise in visual culture, linguistics, popular culture, medical humanities and postcolonial writing. Research in Languages at Queen’s was ranked 3rd in the UK in the most recent Research Assessment (REF 2014).

    Student Experience

    • Students can join a number of student led initiatives within the school including the Law Society, the Alternative Dispute Resolution Society, the Women in Law group and the Street Law project. Other initiatives include the Global Skills Project, LawPod, Queen’s Student Law Journal, Lawyers without Borders, the student magazine ‘The Verdict’ and the Mooting Society.

      Students run a lively French Society, and staff offer support through a personal tutoring system, skills development programme and a structured framework for feedback.
    “Since starting Queen's I haven't regretted my choice of degree once. I love the variety that comes with studying Law alongside a language - variety in people I meet, in styles of teaching, and variety in assessment. The year abroad sets this pathway apart and for me, it was the decisive factor in deciding to study this course."
    Matthew Carson, LLB Law with Language Student
  • Course content

    Course Structure

    Course ContentThe degree offers students the opportunity to study the modules required for the academic stage of legal qualification. In addition, students are offered the opportunity to explore their interests in final year with modules offered that allow them to specialise in a particular area, or simply receive a more rounded sense of what ‘law’ is. Many of these modules consider law and law-like interactions on a local, national and international level. Students spend the third academic year studying French at a university in France or Belgium.
    Stage 1• French 1 - This module aims to consolidate and develop the students existing written and oral language skills and knowledge of French and Francophone culture, equip them with professional and employability skills and prepare them to go further in the study of French.

    • Legal Methods and Skills - Legal Methods and Skills, as its title makes clear, is designed to introduce students to legal craft—specifically, the craft of case-handling. The course provides students with a staged introduction to case-handling, taking them from the basics of navigation and description, to more advanced skills such as written and oral argument. In so doing, the course also addresses a key question: what is law? Specifically, is law’s essence to be found in its form, its function(s), its key actors and institutions, in some combination of these, or in some other way?

    • Constitutional & Administrative Law - Introduces students to the basic institutions and principles of the constitution of the United Kingdom. Examines these institutions and principles in their wider philosophical, historical and political contexts. Introduces a comparative dimension to enable the distinctive features of the constitution to be better understood. Covers the different levels of governance including central government, devolved administrations and supranational institutions and explores the role of non-state actors in the development and workings of the constitution.

    • Contract Law - The course covers the fundamental principles of the general law of contract; rules relating to the formation of contracts and what makes a contract different from a non-binding agreement; key issues concerning the contents of a contract; grounds on which relief may be afforded to a contracting party because of some defect in the making of the contract; ways in which a contract may be ended and the applicable remedies that follow in that event. The theoretical context in which the module is set is one which stresses the transactional quality of Contract Law, i.e. how it enables transactions to be processed, and how it connects with Torts in a joined-up Law of Obligations.

    • Careers & Employability – This Module promotes awareness in relation to career choices and awareness of self. It provides the following:

    Local and International Labour Market Information, where to find it and how to research job markets and career development opportunities e.g. international experiences.

    Personal career choice and action planning supported by the University’s Careers Employability and Skills Service.

    Classes on the job application process, highlighting elements such as CVs, application forms, interview skills and psychometric testing. These also signpost the one to one services available. Self-reflection/career action plan.
    Stage 2• French 2 - Building on skills acquired at Level 1, this module aims to consolidate productive (writing and speaking) and receptive (reading and listening) skills in French language. Key components are: comprehension, translation into English and into French, résumé, grammar, CV preparation. The oral French component includes presentations and preparation for job interviews. Languages for special purposes strands equip students in law or business with skills for legal and professional contexts.


    • Criminal Law - Elements of Crime Actu Reus Mens Rea Offences against Property Theft, Burglary and Robbery, Criminal Damage, Non Fatal Offences against the Person, Assault, Aggravated Assault, Sexual Offences, Homicide, Murder, Manslaughter, Inchoate Offences, General Defences.

    • Tort - The course covers the fundamental principles of the general law of torts, informed by a theoretical, practical and comparative approach emphasizing the underlying function and role of the law of torts in contemporary society. There is also a recurring stress placed throughout the module on the relationship between the law of contract and tort. Key topics covered in the module include the function and philosophy of torts; the relationship between torts and human rights; negligence; trespass to the person; private/public nuisance; protection of reputation (privacy and defamation); vicarious liability; defences and remedies.

    • EU Law – This module offers an introduction to European Union law in a changing world. It examines the European Union as a polity, the legal framework of its institutions and its values (including the role of citizenship and human rights protection). The module continues with an introduction to the fundamentals of the Internal Market and a focus on the key economic freedoms, including primary, secondary and case law on free movement of goods, free movement of workers, freedom to provide and receive services and freedom of establishment. It concludes with a critical assessment of the interaction of institutional and substantive law, focusing on the effect of EU law in its Member States, comparing it to the functioning of international law beyond the EU, as well as critical aspects of the EU’s legitimacy.

    • Company Law & Corporate Governance - This module will introduce students to the foundations of company law. It will introduce students to the role of law in society, specifically in the economy, and to the regulation of corporate governance as a problem addressed both through and beyond company law. The module familiarises students with the corporate person as a concept, with the corporate constitution, with the company’s ‘lifecycle’ from incorporation to winding up and to the roles of and disputes between key stakeholders within the corporate form. The module will also introduce the manner in which corporate actors, mediated through law and regulation, seek to address social relationships, including through human rights and social responsibility initiatives.
    Stage 3• French 3 - Building on skills acquired at level 2, this module aims to develop the skills and understanding required to deal with a broad variety of language tasks. Linguistic, sociolinguistic and cultural awareness will be consolidated and deepened.

    • Land Law - The module provides a critical knowledge and understanding of key aspects of land law. Focusing on the current laws and policy debates in Northern Ireland and in England & Wales, the module outlines the legal frameworks in each, and differentiates the rules of these two legal jurisdictions in a critical and comparative context. Core elements of land law covered in the course include (1) estates in land; (2) land registration systems; (3) licences and proprietary estoppel; (4) co-ownership; (5) landlord and tenant law; (6) mortgages; (7) freehold covenants; (8) easements; and (9) adverse possession.

    • Equity & Trusts - This module deals with the rules and principles governing trusts. The syllabus focuses on three broad areas: 1. the requirements for establishing a valid trust including express trusts; purpose trusts (charitable and private purpose); resulting trusts; and constructive trusts; 2. the powers and obligations of trustees; and 3. the remedies available when trustees act improperly.

    • Evidence and Criminal Procedure - The module covers a range of issues in relation to criminal proceedings and the rules of evidence. It will consider the rules governing criminal investigations, prosecutions and the criminal trial. The module may cover areas of criminal procedure and evidential rules including the burden and standard of proof; rules circumscribing police powers, PACE, the admissibility of evidence, the right to silence; the admissibility of confessions; improperly obtained evidence; character evidence; cross-examination; witnesses and aspects of the trial process.

    Students may select one optional module from the list below. Please note this is not an exclusive list of optional modules. Optional modules are subject to staff availability, student numbers and change each academic year.

    • Climate Emergency – This module offers a critical introduction to law and society’s responses to the climate emergency and calls for ‘system change’, focusing on socio-economic and ecological transitions. The module will aim to enhance the ecological literacy of law students to assist critical thinking about the origins and meaning of law, the changing role and demands on law, and the role of legal pluralism (the pluriverse (Escobar) in navigating societal transitions.

    a. Ecology and the history of our legal traditions
    b. The scope and limits of Environmental Law
    c. Planetary Boundaries (Rockstrom et al. 2009)
    d. Law, Systems and System Change: Sustainable Development Goals
    e. Law and the pluriverse
    f.  Negotiating just transitions: climate negotiating skills

    - Law and climate change (multi-level governance)
    - Law and the wellbeing economy
    - Law, inequality and post-growth
    - Law and energy justice
    - Law and the commons
    - Law and the Rights of Nature

    • The Law of Coroners and Inquests - Indicative syllabic content includes:

    1) The origins of the coronial jurisdiction;
    2) The modern office of coroner;
    3) The jurisdiction of the coroner;
    4) Reporting of deaths;
    5) Conduct of the Inquest: Practicalities and Procedure (I/II);
    6) The inquest verdict;
    7) Challenging coronial decisions;
    8) Human rights and the coroner’s court
    9) Medical inquests;
    10) Notable Inquest: Case Study
    11) The case for reform: comparative analysis with England

    • Equality in Practice - This module is designed for learners who wish to develop an interdisciplinary understanding of equality, diversity and inclusion and to explore strategies for change.

    The module will provide learners with the knowledge and understanding needed to deal effectively with issues of equality, diversity and inclusion at all levels of society, the community and the workplace.

    Learners will draw on academic literature and practical case studies to identify and address challenges in a variety of environments. Case studies, guest lectures and site visits will be used to give students a real appreciation of the importance of equality, diversity and inclusion and the impact that supportive policies have on organisational culture. Interaction with leaders who have championed change in their own professional
    context will equip learners with the essential competencies necessary to meet the challenges of today's rapidly changing world.

    Students will engage in a value mapping exercise to reflect upon their own perceptions concerning aspects of equality, diversity and inclusion to understand the legal, social and cultural factors arising and they will consider foundational theoretical concepts of equality. The module will also introduce the students to the dynamics and processes implicit to inequality and social exclusion and to make them aware of the complexity of the conceptualisation and operationalisation of equality and social exclusion.

    The module will be divided into three parts. The first part of the module will introduce students to the various theories of equality such as formal equality, substantive equality,distributive equality, equality of opportunity, equality of outcomes, intersectionality etc.

    The second part of the module will focus on how a variety of organisations both public and private develop strategies to work on equality, diversity and inclusion both within their organisation and in how they carry out their work.

    The final part of the module will involve guest lectures to allow students to engage with leaders who have championed change within their own organisations (some guest lectures will be delivered live online to facilitate those speakers outside Northern Ireland).

    Pending the situation with Covid-19 in Spring 2023 it is also hoped to have two class site visits. These class site visits would be to large organisations who have implemented large scale successful equality, diversity and inclusion practices in their organisations.

    Students would get to hear from managers, employees and service users of these organisations while also viewing physical spaces that have implemented the principles of equality, diversity and inclusion.
    (Re the feasibility of the site visits - the module leader is a board member of the National Women’s Council of Ireland, as such there will be no issues with securing guest speakers or site visits.)

    •  Law, Literature, and Social Justice - This module will aim to offer students the opportunity to engage in critical analysis of key works of ‘law-heavy’ literature (and some works of popular fiction) that are relevant to issues of human rights violations and social justice (having sparked wider social or legal reforms, and/or controversial discourses) e.g. Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Attwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, Morrison’s Beloved; Ishiguru’s Never Let Me Go, Shelley’s Frankenstein. After close reading of relevant excerpts – and the weekly lecture - students will critique the role and nature of law, rights, and legal processes (as reflected in selected works of ‘protest literature’).

    The overarching theme is that of human vulnerability, arranged by weekly lectures and fortnightly seminars, grounded in group discussions and debates  to identify and analyse issues of social injustice and the need for law/policy reforms. Issues are likely to include:

    a. Gender (e.g. Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre; Attwood’s The Testaments; CEDAW);
    b. The voice of the child (e.g. Godden’s An Episode of Sparrows; Lowry’s The Giver; The UNCRC);
    c. Access to justice (Rose’s 12 Angry Men; Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird; The UDHR);
    d. Resource-rationing and the use of post-apocalyptic or dystopian ‘fictions’ (Huxley’s Brave New World; Orwell’s 1984; Collins’ The Hunger Games; Nolan and Johnson’s Logan’s Run; selection of domestic case law, Coronavirus Act provisions e.g. Care Easements).
    e. Homelessness (Smith’s Hotel World, Roth’s Divergent; Art 8 ECHR – selected case law)
    f. Disenfranchisement – social [in]security (Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath; Dickens’ A Christmas Carol; A1P1 ECHR; selected domestic case law)


    Aspects of such works will be evaluated against law and policy frameworks (e.g. UN Jurisprudence (Country Reports, Concluding Observations, Strasbourg case law, domestic legislation) to gauge the significance – or otherwise – of law reform/rights discourses in times of conflict, austerity, or social upheaval. Comparison with other jurisdictions will be made, where appropriate. There is also scope for guest speakers (from the charitable sector, NGOs etc e.g. CPAG, Kinship Care NI, NSPCC, Women’s Aid, Asylum Link). Students will also be encouraged to suggest works for analysis/debate.

    • Media Law - The module will introduce students to media law in Northern Ireland, and is aimed at students who may be interested in the practice of media law, or who may wish to work in media or public relations. Other jurisdictions (including England, the Republic of Ireland, Europe, US, Australia, and Canada) will be referenced throughout in comparison, as to develop students’ critical appraisal of the law.

    The module will explore how the media’s distribution of information is regulated by the legal regimes of Data Protection, Copyright law, and Freedom of Information. It will also examine the legal framework of Contempt of Court and the obligations of the press in that respect, and the protection of journalistic sources under the law.

    The module will look in depth at the subject of Defamation Law and will instruct students in relation to the legal regime that applies at the time (the Northern Ireland Assembly is currently debating whether to reform this area of law). The module will go into more detail than the brief overview of the subject that is provided students in the undergraduate Torts module. It will examine substantive contemporary issues, such as defamatory meaning, costs in defamation litigation, the defence of truth, privileged communication, the regulation of public interest speech, and liability for online defamation. It will also cover the basic process of a libel action, the particulars of claim, interlocutory matters, the defence, and trial.

    The module will also explore the protection of privacy in law, and good practice of the media in relation to the right to privacy. Again, this would involve covering the subject in greater depth than it is afforded in the undergraduate Torts module. The module will include examination of the Article 8 right to private life, the action of Misuse of Private Information, the various issues and topics that are likely to engage a reasonable expectation of privacy, and the proper conduct of reporting or media relations in respect of privacy. The course will also examine the conditions under which intrusions into private life may be justified in the public interest.

    The module will also examine relevant voluntary press codes, the role of apologies, retractions and corrections, and the extensive body of ‘soft-law’ here which has become increasingly important in the application and development of the law in this area.

    Finally, the module also aims to include two guest speakers; one a high-profile media lawyer who can talk to students about the thriving practice of this area of law in Northern Ireland; the other a print media journalist who can inform students about professional experience with the legal framework in Northern Ireland.

    • The Law and  the Dead - Death is universal, and creates distinct series of legal issues- affecting both the deceased and those who are left behind- from the moment of someone’s passing. This module explores selected issues, around the fate of the recently dead and the assets that they leave behind. It fuses the doctrinal with the theoretical, and draws on a range of other disciplines beyond law. 

    Part 1 of the module looks at the fate of the recently dead, focusing on three distinct topics: (i) post-mortems, and the law’s adaptation to new methods of technology and religious/cultural sensitivities towards invasive procedures; (ii) the legal resolution of family disputes over funerals; and (iii) the legal challenges posed by new methods of bodily disposal (e.g. natural burial, water cremation and human composting) that are being driven by demand for greater choice and environmental concerns.

    Part 2 of the module looks at core elements of succession law. Beginning with theories of inheritance, it focuses on will-making and the attempts to move beyond rigid compliance with legal formalities in the internet age and drawing also on the recent experience of the pandemic (when will-making increased significantly and access to legal services was more difficult). This is followed by intestacy laws (rules for estate distribution where someone dies without a (valid) will) and whether these laws replicate modern notions of kinship and family. The module then moves to family provision, which allows specific relatives and dependants to challenge the fact that they did not receive anything/enough from the deceased’s estate, and focuses on high-profile, contentious legal disputes between two categories of applicant: surviving spouses and independent adult children. The family provision system (unique to the common law) is contrasted with civil law inheritance systems with their fixed shares spouses and dependants. Finally, the module looks at the legal and social policy issues ‘of dead hand control’, where will-makers try to control their beneficiaries’ behaviours and lifestyle choices from beyond the grave by leaving gifts with forfeiting conditions attached.

    • Business and Human Rights - This module is designed to introduce students to an emerging and important area of the law, namely the role that business plays in the protection of human rights.  Large business, typically referred to in the literature as global corporations (or Multi-national/trans-national corporations) have in the last fifty years or so become increasingly powerful entities within the global system.  Now not only concerned with economic impacts on society, increasingly their operations are having a profound effect on the social, economic and environmental lives of the people with whom directly, or indirectly they interact.  In order to govern and legitimize their global corporations, they rely on different outlets.  Two of these outlets are the focus for this course, human rights discourse and corporate social responsibility (CSR).  The primary aim of this module is to attempt to situate the role of business within the human rights and broader responsibility discourse.  We will cover issues around the international regulation of human rights through and around law, important interactions between state and non-state actors and human rights discourses and obligations across corporate groups, through value chains and in investment operations.

    • Clinical Law - This module, which involves a ten-week placement with the Law Centre NI, is intended to facilitate critical reflection on the law in practice and to help you understand what the law can, and cannot, achieve on behalf of individuals. In practice, this will be done by allowing you to assist in cases related to tribunal proceedings and to analyse the relationship between law and facts, statute law and case law, and the human needs of clients. While you will, of course, be able to develop only a partial understanding of such issues in a twelve-week module, you will have the chance to transpose some of your learning from the classroom into the reality of the Law Centre’s work. The course is, in that sense, very much about (clinical) law in practice, and it can for that reason be regarded as unique within the Law School’s curriculum.

    • Competition Law - This module is an introduction to competition (or, as the Americans call it, “Antitrust”) law. It examines the legal rules in place which govern the market to make it more “competitive”. The usual rationale for this is that competitive markets benefit consumers by ensuring lower prices and better products and services. The typical threat to the consumer is a large firm which possesses significant market power, which can use that power to raise prices, and because consumers have no other options such firms can treat consumers poorly and not bother with improving their products.

    •  Consumer Law and Policy - This module aims to provide students with awareness and understanding of consumer right protection legislation and policy, the underpinning economic and social rationales as well as practical application in a rage of realistic scenarios. Consumer law regulates great many daily transactions and activities. These include sale of goods and services (inclusive of online shopping) and consumer financing and credit.

    This course has a strong contemporary focus. Apart from necessary familiarisation with theory, real-world, everyday life problems will be used to discuss appropriateness and actual application of existing protections and to identify their shortcomings, areas in need of further legislative intervention. Therefore, apart from providing theoretical understand of consumer law and policy, this module offers the potential to empower you as a consumer and prepare you to assertively face some of the challenges consumer dealings may present to you in the future (regardless of the career path you chose to follow).

    Everyday examples of consumer protection may relate to, for example, shopping online, misleading advertising, flights cancelations, protections offered under credit cards, problems with holiday bookings, post-purchase quality problems as well as options generally available to consumers in case of small, everyday disputes.

    • Contemporary Issues in British and Irish Human Rights - This module will allow students to explore in some depth a variety of issues that raise important and difficult questions in the UK and/or Ireland concerning the extent to which certain claims should be legally protected as human rights claims. It will build on knowledge and skills already transferred to students through their Constitutional Law in Context and Rights and Accountability modules. The content of the module will vary from year to year depending on the issues that are most topical at the time and the staff available to teach on the module, but it is likely that in most years at least two or three weeks of teaching will be devoted to each of the following: (a) the prevention of terrorism, (b) the right to freedom from Torture, (c) the right to education, (d) the right to freedom of expression, and (e) the right to fair trial. The focus will be on how legislative and judicial institutions the UK and Ireland and the European jurisprudence have addressed these matters, with particular emphasis on case law.

    • Criminal Liability - This module explores the boundaries of the criminal law examining issues of current controversy.  Deciding what to criminalise or decriminalise are important issues for any society. The proper boundaries of the criminal law are often contested with competing ideologies and perspectives offering different viewpoints. The module adopts a doctrinal, socio-legal and philosophical approach to the exploration of these issues. Issues to be examined include: Theories of criminalisation; Responding to hate crime; Responding to stalking and harassment; Regulating prostitution; Regulating the use of illegal drugs; Regulating pornography; The criminalisation of transmission of disease; Responding to anti-social behaviour.

    • Criminology: Theory and Practice - This course is designed to offer students an introduction to some of the key issues and controversies surrounding the study of crime from a social scientific perspective. Crime will be understood as a legal and social construct rather than as an unchallengeable fact. Crimes are legally defined, they vary over time and between jurisdictions, they are therefore clearly linked to questions of power and powerlessness, gender, race and a host of other variables. The analysis of the criminal justice process, therefore, will be underpinned by such critical views. These issues will be explored through an array of national and international research evidence, and will also draw upon current developments and the lecturers’ own research. Drawing on inter-disciplinary sources and establishing an academic agenda for critical analysis it considers the foundations of and alternatives to criminal justice in the context of a society and social order that is ‘in transition’. Finally, it seeks to develop interdisciplinary skills and to encourage a full appreciation of the social nature of legal regulation and the role of criminology in understanding and resolving conflict.

    • Employment Law - This module will expose students to the wide range of laws relating to the world of work. It will introduce them to the main challenges of employment law and its significance, before going on to analyse some of the key topics in employment law such as the nature of an employment contract, the legal duties of an employer (especially as regards health and safety), the rights of an employee (especially as regards discrimination and privacy), the law relating to trades unions, the influence of the European Union, and the means by which employment contracts can be terminated. It will to some extent build upon knowledge gained from Contract and Tort. The focus will be on how legislative, administrative and judicial institutions in England and Wales and in Northern Ireland have addressed the issues most commonly arising in the employment relationship.

    • Environmental Law - The course introduces students to the issues faced by the legal community in tackling environmental degradation. In particular the course highlights how the law seeks to achieve and enforce a sustainable balance between economic development and the protection of the environment for present and future generations. Specific course content within the following structure is subject to change depending upon availability of individual staff members.  Course content, in detail, will be as follows: Part 1: An Introduction to Environmental law, Part 2: A Study of Important Areas of Environmental Law Part 3: Cross Cutting Issues.

    • Financial Services Law - This course will offer an introduction to the law of finance. Finance is often defined as the backbone of the economy as it provides essential services such as payment or credit intermediation, without which no business would be possible. In recent decades, the volume of legislation on financial law has increased exponentially and it touches virtually every aspect of financial intermediation, from day-to-day financial transactions to the regulation of cryptocurrencies. The objective of the module is to equip students with the analytical tools to navigate the complex world of finance from a legal perspective. The module will offer a broad overview of the three main pillars of financial law: financial institutions, financial transactions, and markets.

    • Gender, Justice and Society - The module provides students with an understanding of how law affects people differently, depending on gender and the ways in which law contributes to regulating and representing gender. This understanding is not specific to one area of law, rather the course cuts across a number of different areas (such as criminal law, human rights, international law) increasing students’ knowledge and understanding of legal issues more generally at the national and international levels from a gendered perspective. Students will have the opportunity to further evaluate these issues through film and visual representation of the interaction between gender, justice and society. The module introduces students to a number of new and different topics (for example, judicial decision making, the Global South, LGBTQI, kinship and reproduction, the military) from which to interrogate contemporary debates on gender and contribute to the development of students’ critical and analytical skills.

    • Global Business Law and Regulation - The role of law and regulation in the global economy shifted significantly over the past decades. This shift has been described as a shift to a modern regulatory state or to regulatory capitalism which is based on a complex mix of private and public regulation. This module focuses on the role of law and regulation in the area of global business and introduces students to key theoretical issues and practical problems affecting the operation of business in the global economy. Students will gain a detailed understanding and knowledge of the motives and drivers behind global business law and regulation, the dynamics of regulatory change and the problems, flaws, and challenges of global business law and regulation.

    • Intellectual Property Law - Intellectual property is widely perceived to be vital in fostering innovation and creativity in the global marketplace. Intellectual property protects innovative ideas, original literary and artistic works, attractive designs, and distinctive marks. The fact that protection is available provides an incentive for individuals and businesses to create new inventions and eye-catching products, cultural goods and brands. Moreover, intellectual property contributes enormously to the national economy. For example, the UK government recently reported that the creative industries generated £76.9 billion towards the country’s economy in 2013, and that the creative industries are currently growing at twice the rate of the wider UK economy. Similarly, the US Chamber of Commerce estimates that IP-intensive industries employ over 55 million Americans and are worth around $5.8 trillion to the country’s economy.

    • International Humanitarian Law - International humanitarian law (IHL sometimes called the Law of Armed Conflict (LOAC) is a core component of international law and governs the conduct of hostilities. The laws of war do not prohibit warfare – they are meant to regulate it, and mitigate the resultant humanitarian suffering, by directing the use of force towards the opposing armed forces. Surprisingly, the laws of war do not prohibit the killing of civilians; instead they prohibit their specific targeting, allowing for deaths of civilians (under the euphemism of ‘collateral damage’) in proportion to the military objective sought. The module begins by charting the history and legal basis of IHL, exploring the work of the Red Cross and the development of the Hague and Geneva Conventions, before examining the international law regarding the commencement of hostilities (jus ad bellum) and the conduct of hostilities (jus in bello). Further lectures will explore contemporary challenges regarding the conduct of hostilities, accountability for breaches of the laws of war, and modern methods of warfare through lectures, presentations and inter-active group work.

    • International Trade Law - This module will introduce students to the foundations of international trade law. We will explore the theories explaining the benefits, barriers and problems of a free trade regime, the institutional evolution of the global trade regime and policy, especially within the World Trade Organisation, the principles of international trade law, the role of tariffs and non-tariff standards, dispute settlement, various key issues of conflicts and tensions between trade and other policy domains, and challenges for the contemporary global trade regime. 

    • International Criminal and Transitional Justice - Since the Second World War international criminal justice has emerged as a body of law to hold individuals responsible for mass atrocities. This module aims to introduce students to the key questions on the relationships between international law, justice and the transition from conflict in the 21st century through an exploration of law, criminological and social theory and case studies. The module adopts a broad interdisciplinary approach to mapping these connected issues and draws on a range of source and geo-political contexts (Latin America and Africa). It touches on contemporary controversies with international justice and domestic political conflicts, such as the intervention of the ICC in Palestine, criminal responsibility of child soldiers who become commanders, and reparations by multinational corporations.

    • Law & Psychology - This module provides students with an introduction to the role of psychology within the law and in the operation of legal systems. It aims to explore both the presence of psychological concepts within the substance of the law and the ways in which a range of legal skills is imbued with processes and dynamics that have psychological underpinnings. Group work and problem-based learning (PBL) approaches will form an integral part of the module.  The module will begin with an examination of skills development within a group context, including (but not limited to): individual learning styles, formation of group identity, legal research, individual roles within groups, conflict resolution and communication (oral and written). There will be discussion of psychological and organisational theories throughout.  In the second part of the module, the focus will be on areas of the law where psychological factors (including emotion, group behaviour, mental capacity) play a role, for example in criminal law, property law and obligations. There will also be an examination of decision-making processes within the justice system (e.g. juries), lie detection, eyewitness testimony and the role of the forensic psychologist. The final part of the module will explore a mixed-subject PBL scenario, in which students identify key legal issues and conduct research into both substantive and normative areas of law, including the relevant psychological components. There will be opportunities for students to engage in presentations within class, based on group work.

    • Medical Law & Ethics - This module will familiarise students with the law on medical law and ethics. There will be a particular focus on current issues in the area.

    • Media and Information Law - In this module, students consider the various ways in which the media and information industries are regulated. The growth and significance of these industries in the 21st century has given rise to a range of legal disputes, as well as new legislation, regulatory systems, and international treaties; these disputes and interventions share a common feature of how a legal system ought to address innovation, human rights, transnational transactions and services, and the effectiveness of existing mechanisms, in a context of often rapid technological, economic and cultural change.  Indicative topics include the regulation of broadcasting, film, and games; electronic commerce and related consumer issues; data protection; the liability of intermediaries; Internet-related criminal offences.  Conceptual issues explored include the interaction between different types of regulation (e.g. statute, industry-led self-regulation, system design), whether ‘information’ and information technologies have special characteristics making conventional forms of control less feasible, and questions of jurisdiction and globalisation.

    • Legal Theory - This module is designed to equip students with the skills to better understand law, to ask questions about what law ‘is’ and what it ‘ought’ to be from a variety of perspectives. In doing so, students are encouraged to consider their own views and understandings of law, but also to encounter new views and understandings. This involves moving from a ‘black letter’ understanding of law and legal rules to engage with law in a more conceptual, creative and critical way. Students will explore a number of different theoretical perspectives which each provide contrasting ways to think about law, legal institutions and contemporary legal problems. These perspectives include Marxism, feminism, queer theory, post colonialism, critical race theory, sociology of law, critical legal studies, and legal positivism. Students will become familiar with the variety of tools which these interdisciplinary theoretical perspectives offer to interrogate law and ask critical questions about its everyday operation. The questions these theoretical tools help us to ask include ‘What role does law play in society?’, ‘Is law neutral?’, ‘What do the ideas of “justice” and “equality” mean?’, ‘What is the relationship between law and social change?’

    • Public International Law - There has never been a more exciting time to study Public International Law (PIL). Issues of international law and international justice are at the forefront of public debates and feature prominently also in domestic courts to a greater degree than ever before. International law provides the intellectual and the technical underpinnings to large areas of international co-operation. The PIL module covers the major areas of general international law and is not over-specialized. The lectures cover the core topics such as the nature and sources of international law, its relationship with national law but also introduces students to special areas such as international criminal law, and international human rights law. In addition, students will be examining the contextual constraints associated with public international law. The module will also cover the applicable rules governing international relations, and develop an understanding of the specifics of the law-making process in public international law and the intended and unintended consequences of present-day rule-making processes with regards to the politics and philosophy that dominates some of these areas. In sum, the PIL module will enable students to critically examine public international law.

    • Regulating Commercial Sex - The issue of sex is perhaps the one area of human behaviour that has been historically subject to particularly high levels of formal and informal regulation including the law, the police and official agencies but also via cultural norms and mores. This regulation extends to the arena of sexual commerce generally (pornography, lap dancing and strip clubs, massage parlours, Internet based web cams) but also to the regulation of commercial sex which usually involves the exchange of money or other goods for the provision of direct and physical sexual services. In many respects the provision of commercial sex and how it is policed and regulated has been challenged fundamentally by the growth of the digital economy and the contribution of the Internet to the growth and development of new sex markets. The module focuses primarily on developments that have occurred in the UK and Ireland but also draws upon comparative international evidence where required.

    • Remedies in Private Law - Contract Law Remedies – damages, actions for the price, liquidated damages clauses, specific performance, rescission, and rectification. Tort Law Remedies – mainly injunctions (permanent and interim). Equitable compensation and accounts of profits. Enforcement. Alternative Dispute Resolution.

    • Research Project A/B - A dissertation affords students the chance to research, explore and write an extended piece of work in an area of the student’s interest (subject to the availability of appropriate supervision). This module therefore offers students the opportunity to explore, in detail, an area of law that particularly interests them. In so doing, students will be able to develop their research and writing skills. As a student led module, success in the module requires excellent time management skills, self-discipline and application.

    • Sentencing - In this module we shall be looking at the law of sentencing.  Sentencing is a subject that was not very widely studied in the past in the academic context, but is now recognised as one of the most important parts of the criminal process; indeed, given that a good number of defendants in the criminal courts plead guilty, sentencing is arguably of as much if not more practical significance than the substantive criminal law itself.  Over the course of the module we shall be looking at the topic of sentencing from various different angles.  First of all, we shall look at the issue of punishment in general, both from a philosophical and a human rights perspective. Then we shall study the sentencing process, beginning with the conviction and ending with the final disposal of the case.  Next, we shall look more closely at the different types of sentence provided by the law, with special emphasis on the sentencing structure set out in relevant legislation.  We shall look at the sentencing of children and young offenders, with particular emphasis being placed on the important topic of restorative justice.  We shall look at the effect of mental abnormality on the sentencing process, and at the use of ancillary orders such as the confiscation of assets.  All of these topics will be looked at against the background of the contemporary penal system and the problems with which it is confronted.

    People teaching you

    Dr Adeniyi Olayode
    LLB Law with Languages Co-ordinator

    School of Law
    E: a.olayode@qub.ac.uk T: +44 (0)28 9097 3857 www.qub.ac.uk/law

    Contact Teaching Times

    Personal Study24 (hours maximum)
    20-24 hours studying and revising in your own time each week, including guided study using handouts, online activities and group study opportunities.
    Large Group Teaching6 (hours maximum)
    hours of lectures in Law
    Small Group Teaching/Personal Tutorial8 (hours maximum)
    8 (hours maximum) You will have 3-4 hours tutorials per week in Law. In French you will have 3 hours of language tuition in small groups, plus a specialist 1 hour seminar on Legal French.

    Learning and Teaching

    The Law School at Queen's is ranked as one of the top Schools in the UK and Ireland. Teaching quality within the School was judged to be 'excellent' and our research was awarded a 5B (excellent) by the UK Higher Education Funding Bodies.

    There are over 1,000 undergraduate students enrolled in the School of Law, 250 postgraduates, 30 PhD students and almost 50 members of academic staff. You will be taught by scholars from all over the world, many of whom have international reputations in their fields and all are committed teachers and researchers. Students will also have access to an excellent law section in the new library and extensive IT facilities. In addition, the School has active relationships with universities throughout the world – for Law and French students, these relationships offer opportunities for study abroad and staff exchanges, both of which can greatly enhance the student experience.

    The School operates a proactive system of student support. Advisers of Studies are allocated to each degree programme tasked to guide and support you throughout your time with us, together with the School's experienced and helpful administrative staff. In addition, students are allocated a Personal Development Programme Tutor for their time in the School. We place considerable emphasis on facilitating good communication between staff and students. To this end, a Student Voice Committee, comprised of elected student representatives, the Advisers and the Director of Education, meets twice each semester. This Committee provides students with a forum in which to raise matters of concern to them and also enables the School to keep students informed about matters affecting the School and wider university.

    At Queen’s, we aim to deliver a high quality learning environment that embeds intellectual curiosity, innovation and best practice in learning, teaching and student support to enable student to achieve their full academic potential.

    On the LLB programmes we do this by providing a range of learning experiences which enables our students to engage with subject experts, develop attributes and perspectives that will equip them for life and work in a global society and make use of innovative technologies and a world class library that enhances their development as independent, life-long learners. Examples of the opportunities provided for learning on this course are:

    • E-Learning technologies
      Information associated with lectures and assignments is communicated via a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) called Canvas. A range of e-learning experiences are also embedded in the degree through, for example: interactive group workshops in a flexible learning space; use of MS Teams; podcasts and interactive web-based learning activities; opportunities to use IT programmes associated with design in project- based work etc.
    • Language enrichment classes
      Students will have opportunities to develop oral skills and develop their knowledge of grammar and vocabulary in real-life, practical contexts. All these classes are taught in very small groups (typically 10-15 students). Students attend two language enrichment classes per week as part of the core language module. They also attend a one-hour oral class (typically 8-12 students), delivered by a native speaker.
    • Lectures
      Provide information about topics as a starting point for further self-directed private study/reading. Lectures also provide opportunities to ask questions, gain some feedback and advice on assessments (normally delivered in large groups to all year group peers). Law and French students will undertake the core law modules that will enable them to graduate with a Qualifying Law Degree (QLD) in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. This means that all the law modules that the students on this pathway will study are compulsory.
    • Personal Tutor
      Undergraduates are allocated a Personal Tutor during their time in the School. Tutors meet with their students on several occasions during the year to support their academic development.
    • Self-directed study
      This is an essential part of life as a Queen’s Law student when important private reading and research, engagement with e-learning resources, reflection on feedback to date and assignment research and preparation work is carried out.
    • Seminars/tutorials
      Significant amounts of teaching, in both Law and French, are carried out in small groups (typically 10-20 students). These provide an opportunity for students to engage with academic staff who have specialist knowledge of the topic, to ask questions of them and to assess their own progress and understanding with the support of peers. Students should also expect to make presentations and other contributions to these groups.

      In French, at every level of your degree, tailor-made tutorials (one hour per week) will be provided to introduce you to the French legal system, to enhance your specialist vocabulary, and to help prepare you for studying law at a French/Belgian university in third year. You will focus on the different sources of French law, will study institutions, cases, and the practice of justice in France, and will discuss a range of topical issues with legal/judicial ramifications.
    • Work placements
      In conjunction with the Careers, Employability and Skills Department, there are opportunities for a number of summer internships. These provide significant learning and employability enhancement opportunities.
    • Year Abroad
      Students spend an academic year studying French at a university in France or Belgium. In addition to the benefits for oral competence in French, the residence provides a unique opportunity for immersion in French and francophone culture. This feature of our degree programme gives students the opportunity for personal development, further developing communication and language skills and intercultural awareness. The challenges of living abroad come to be a unique (and unforgettable) stage in personal development, and significantly enhance employability.

    Assessment

    Details of assessments associated with this course are outlined below:

    • The way in which students are assessed will vary according to the learning objectives of each module. Some modules are assessed solely through project work or written assignments. Others are assessed through a combination of coursework and end of year examinations. Language modules are assessed through a variety of written tasks, class tests, a formal written examination and an oral exam at the end of the year. All assessment, apart from oral exams, is marked and returned anonymously. Details of how each module is assessed are shown in the Student Handbook which is provided to all students during their first-year induction.

    Feedback

    As students progress through their course at Queen’s they will receive general and specific feedback about their work from a variety of sources including lecturers, module co-ordinators, placement supervisors, personal tutors, advisers of study and peers. University students are expected to engage with reflective practice and to use this approach to improve the quality of their work. Feedback may be provided in a variety of forms including:

    • Summative feedback provided via formal written comments and marks relating to work that students, as individuals or as part of a group, have submitted.
    • Formative feedback opportunities such as face-to-face comment. This may include occasions when students make use of the lecturers’ advertised “feedback and guidance hours” to help address a specific query.
    • Placement employer comments or references.
    • Online or emailed comment.
    • General comments or question and answer opportunities at the end of a lecture, seminar or tutorial.
    • Immediate, on-the-spot feedback from your teacher during language and oral classes
    • Pre-submission advice regarding the standards you should aim for and common pitfalls to avoid. In some instances, this may be provided in the form of model answers or exemplars which students can review in their own time.
    • Feedback and outcomes from practical classes.
    • Comment and guidance provided by staff from specialist support services such as, Careers, Employability and Skills or the Learning Development Service.
    • Once students have reviewed their feedback, they are encouraged to identify and implement further improvements to the quality of their work.

    Facilities

    In September 2016, the School of Law moved into a £20m facility. This provides a variety of innovative teaching spaces to support a pioneering culture of learning, central to which is the Moot Court Room interactive teaching space.

    The facility also incorporates the Herbert Smith Freehills Student Hub supported by the leading global law firm as part of a 5-year sponsorship. This 600m2 space on the ground floor provides social and informal group study facilities and a café area.
    https://vimeo.com/189337628

    PREV
    Overview

  • Modules

    Modules

    The information below is intended as an example only, featuring module details for the current year of study. Modules are reviewed on an annual basis and may be subject to future changes – revised details will be published through Programme Specifications ahead of each academic year.

    • Year 1
      • French 1
        Overview

        This module aims to consolidate and develop the students existing written and oral language skills and knowledge of French and Francophone culture, equip them with professional and employability skills and prepare them to go further in the study of French. It consists of four elements designed to provide a comprehensive consolidation of French language competence:

        1. Language Seminar (1hr per week)
        Seminar aims to develop students ability to understand, translate and compose French language materials in a range of forms: text, image, audio-visual. Language will be engaged in context, guided by themes such as University life, Culture and Identity and Culture and Communication. Linguistic competence will be developed through a range of methods that may include: group discussion, comprehension, translation, responsive and essay writing.

        2. Grammar Workshop (1hr per week)
        Workshop designed to consolidate and enrich students' knowledge and understanding of French grammar and syntax. All major areas of grammar will be encountered, laying the foundations for future study of the language and its nuances. It focuses particularly on developing competence in the key area of translation into French.

        3. Professional skills (1hr per week)
        The class focuses on language skills for special purposes and contains two strands: Language for Business and Language for Law. Both provide linguistic and socio-cultural knowledge important to work-related situations in different fields.

        4. Conversation class (1hr per week)
        Conversation class is led by a native speaker of French and compliments the content of the Language hour. Students will meet in small groups to discuss, debate and present on the main themes of the course.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of the modules students should:
        1. Be able to read French texts in a variety of forms and demonstrate a sensitivity to their detail and nuance in speech, writing and when translating.
        2. Be able to produce French texts appropriate to different requirements and registers.
        3. Be able to investigate, structure and present a complex argument in longer pieces of written work.
        4. Be able to communicate using more sophisticated grammatical and syntactical constructions with a good level of accuracy (without basic errors).

        Skills

        On successful completion of the modules students should have developed the following range of skills: comprehensive dexterity using French grammar; translation skills; text analysis; comprehension; essay writing; lexicographical skills; report writing skills; IT skills; presentation skills; spoken language skills

        Assessment

        Completion and submission of continual assessment and coursework: written exam; oral exam

        Coursework

        35%

        Written

        40%

        Practical

        25%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        40

        Module Code

        FRH1101

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Careers and Employability
        Overview

        The Module will promote both student awareness in relation to career choices and awareness of self. It will provide the following:
        Local and International Labour Market Information, where to find it and how to research job markets and career development opportunities e.g. international experiences.
        Personal career choice and action planning supported by the University’s Careers Employability and Skills Service
        Classes on the job application process, highlighting elements such as CVs, application forms, interview skills and psychometric testing. These will also signpost the one to one services available to students through the Career, Employability and Skills Service and ensure students have an understanding of the recruitment process in its entirety.
        Self reflection/career action plan.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will –
        Relate their study to the work environment
        Become more aware of their career aspirations and how to achieve them;
        Develop knowledge of undergraduate and graduate opportunities both locally and internationally;
        Understand the skills required to compete effectively for vacation placements and graduate jobs;

        Skills

        The module equips students with a solid understanding of the job market and the careers inherent within it.
        The module will provide students with knowledge of the role of the University’s Careers Employability and Skills Service and highlight the opportunity for them to engage in more in-depth mentored by Career Consultants who will support and coach the students in achieving their career aims.
        The module will develop student skills in writing CVs and job applications as well as in relation to interview skills

        Assessment

        All level 1 students are automatically enrolled on this module. Since it is not credit bearing and does not contribute to the degree classification, successful completion of this module is assessed via attendance. Students need to attend at least 4 scheduled sessions, and must attend sessions on Module Introduction/Self-Awareness, and on job applications and CV writing.
        The result will be displayed as a Pass/Fail on the degree transcript.
        A register of attendance will be collated at each session.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        0

        Module Code

        LAW1027

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Constitutional and Administrative Law
        Overview

        Introduces students to the basic institutions and principles of the constitution of the United Kingdom. Examines these institutions and principles in their wider philosophical, historical and political contexts. Introduces a comparative dimension to enable the distinctive features of the constitution to be better understood. Covers the different levels of governance including central government, devolved administrations and supranational institutions and explores the role of non-state actors in the development and workings of the constitution. Links to European Union Law.

        Learning Outcomes

        Building on Induction, students will acquire knowledge and understanding of: 1. The institutions of the Constitution (including Parliament, Executive, Courts, devolved administrations) 2. Major constitutional doctrines (including the rule of law, parliamentary sovereignty) 3. The influence of European and International factors on the Constitution 4. The constitutional arrangements for Northern Ireland 5. Debates about democracy, the rule of law, globalisation and juridification 6. The contexts (historical, political) in which constitutional law operates.

        Building upon semester 1's study of basic constitutional law, the module will develop a fuller understanding of how public power is (or is not) constrained in the UK, whether within the framework of the Human Rights Act 1998, through judicial review, and/or through other accountability actors such as Commissions and Ombudsmen. While the focus of the course will be largely UK-centric, it will also contain an important comparative element, understanding the relationship between domestic law and international human rights standards. Students will also develop a deeper understanding of common law constitutionalism.

        Skills

        1. An understanding of the principal features of the UK legal system. 2. Understand Constitutional Law in its wider philosophical, historical, political and comparative contexts. 3. Identify accurately issues that require researching. 4. Identify and retrieve up-to-date legal information, using paper and electronic sources. 5. Use relevant primary and secondary legal sources. 6. Recognise and rank items and issues in terms of relevance and importance from a variety of different sources. 7. Act independently in planning and undertaking tasks. 8. Synthesise doctrinal and policy issues in relation to a topic. 9. Judge critically the merits of particular arguments. 10. Present and make a reasoned choice based on an informed understanding of standard arguments in the area of law in question. 11. Reflect on own learning and proactively seek and make use of feedback. 12. Use English proficiently in relation to legal matters. 13. Time management. 14. Present knowledge or an argument in a way that is comprehensible to others. 15. Read and discuss legal materials which are written in technical and complex language. 16. Produce word processed essays. 17. Use the web and email. 18. Work in groups as a participant.

        In Semester 2 students will acquire knowledge and understanding of: 1. The European Convention on Human Rights (institutions; substantive and procedural guarantees; general principles of law). 2. Key features of the wider body of international human rights law. 3. Common law constitutional rights. 4. The Human Rights Act 1998 (key provisions; leading case law). 5. Judicial Review (standing; respondents; grounds for review; remedies). 6. The role of Commissions (principally the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission; the Equality Commission; the Parliamentary Commissioner for Complaints).

        Assessment

        This module is assessed by a 1,500 word essay in semester 1 (20%) and a final exam in the summer exam period. The exam will count for 80% of the marks for this module

        Coursework

        20%

        Written

        80%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        40

        Module Code

        LAW1029

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Contract Law
        Overview

        The course covers the fundamental principles of the general law of contract; rules relating to the formation of contracts and what makes a contract different from a non-binding agreement; key issues concerning the contents of a contract; grounds on which relief may be afforded to a contracting party because of some defect in the making of the contract; ways in which a contract may be ended and the applicable remedies that follow in that event. The theoretical context in which the module is set is one which stresses the transactional quality of Contract Law, i.e. how it enables transactions to be processed, and how it connects with Torts in a joined up Law of Obligations.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of: the fundamental principles of the Law of Contract and will be able to apply them to produce reasoned solutions to problem scenarios; how Contract Law operates in practice and how to evaluate it in terms of efficiency and fairness; how to read contracts for the purposes of understanding their meaning, identifying problems of interpretation and enforceability; how Contract Law facilitates transactions; how Contract law connects to other parts of the Law of Obligations, particularly Torts.

        Skills

        Building on Level 1, students will acquire and develop a wide range of legal and wider employability skills including: A critical understanding of the principal features of the UK legal system; Understand Contract Law in its wider contexts; Identify accurately issues that require researching; Problem Solving; Identify and retrieve up to date legal information; Use relevant primary and secondary legal sources; Recognise and rank terms and issues in terms of relevance and importance; Bring together information and materials from a variety of different sources; Act independently in planning and undertaking tasks; Synthesise doctrinal and policy issues in relation to a topic; Judge critically the merits of particular arguments; Present and make a reasoned choice between alternative solutions; Make a personal and reasoned judgment based on an informed understanding of standard arguments in the area of law in question; Reflect on own learning and proactively seek and make use of feedback; Use English proficiently; Time management; Present knowledge or an argument in a way that is comprehensible to others and which is directed at their concerns; Use, present and evaluate information provided in a numerical or statistical form.

        Assessment

        50% Coursework
        50% Examination

        Coursework

        50%

        Written

        50%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW1031

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Legal Methods & Skills
        Overview

        Legal Methods and Skills, as its title makes clear, is designed to introduce students to legal craft—specifically, the craft of case-handling.

        The course provides students with a staged introduction to case-handling, taking them from the basics of navigation and description, to more advanced skills such as written and oral argument.

        In so doing, the course also addresses a key question: what is law? Specifically, is law’s essence to be found in its form, its function(s), its key actors and institutions, in some combination of these, or in some other way?

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will acquire case-handling skills, a key component in successful transition to law school life. Specifically, students will learn how to:

        (i) navigate a case;
        (ii) describe key elements of a case (facts, issue(s), decision and reason(s)); and
        (iii) analyse a case, in both a narrow manner and a broader law-in-context one.

        In addition, via the cases with which they engage, students will develop an awareness of the role of law in society. Students will also have a grasp of legal system basics, such as the court structure.

        Skills

        The course develops two key skills:

        (i) case-handling (notably description and analysis). More particularly, the ability to be clear, concise and precise, and to support one’s claims in an appropriate manner, whether orally or using the written word.

        (ii) the ability to evaluate the role of law in society, and to do so in a manner that is clear, concise, precise and supported in an appropriate manner.

        Assessment

        Assessment

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        1

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW1028

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        8 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

    • Year 2
      • French 2
        Overview

        Course contents: Building on skills acquired at Level 1, this module aims to consolidate productive (writing and speaking) and receptive (reading and listening) skills in French language. Key components are: comprehension, translation into English and into French, résumé, grammar, CV preparation. The oral French component includes presentations and preparation for job interviews. Languages for special purposes strands equip students in law or business with skills for legal and professional contexts.
        This module will contain the following elements:
        1.Written language (2 hrs per week)
        This component will focus on enhancing ability in written French through engagement with a range of journalistic and literary written texts at appropriate level. A variety of topics will be covered, dealing with current themes in society and topical issues. Written language tasks include translation (from and into French), résumé, comprehension and grammar exercises.
        2.Oral language (1 hr per week)
        This component will focus on enhancing ability in oral French. A variety of topics and themes are covered, which aim to develop knowledge of issues in present-day France, prepare students for the year abroad and for job interviews in the target language. Stimulus materials from a range of media (textual, visual, audio, video) are used.
        3.Contextual Study (filière; 1 hr per week)
        This component will raise awareness of cultural and linguistic issues in French and allow students to deepen their perspective of the field, as well as preparing students for a residence in a French-speaking country.

        Learning Outcomes

        Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of the modules students should:
        1) be able to demonstrate fluency, accuracy and spontaneity in spoken and written French, with a broad range of vocabulary and expression, so as to be able to discuss a variety of complex issues;
        2) be able to read wide variety of French texts and identify important information and ideas within them;
        3) be able to translate a range of texts into and from French;
        4) have developed a detailed critical understanding of representative textual and other material;
        5) be able to engage in complex problem-solving exercises.

        Skills

        On successful completion of the modules students should have developed the following range of skills:
        Skills in written and oral expression; critical awareness and problem-solving; close textual analysis; translation; comprehension; presentation; IT skills; employability skills, such as interview technique and cv preparation.

        Assessment

        Completion and submission of continual assessment and coursework; written exam; oral exam

        Coursework

        35%

        Written

        40%

        Practical

        25%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        40

        Module Code

        FRH2101

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        Yes

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • EU Law
        Overview

        This module offers an introduction to European Union law in a changing world. It examines the European Union as a polity, the legal framework of its institutions and its values (including the role of citizenship and human rights protection). The module continues with an introduction to the fundamentals of the Internal Market and a focus on the key economic freedoms, including primary, secondary and case law on free movement of goods, free movement of workers, freedom to provide and receive services and freedom of establishment. It concludes with a critical assessment of the interaction of institutional and substantive law, focusing on the effect of EU law in its Member States, comparing it to the functioning of international law beyond the EU, as well as critical aspects of the EU’s legitimacy.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students understand the role and cooperation of the EU’s institutions, in comparison with international organisations and the understand the interaction of EU law and polity in law making and adjudication at EU level. Students are introduced to the socio-economic basis for transnational economic integration, and the legal framework of the EU internal market, and can apply two of the economic freedoms to a problem scenario. Students are able to critically access the interaction of substantive and institutional EU law, are able to answer problem questions on the effects of EU law, and discuss critically the EUs legitimacy from a constitutional standpoint.

        Skills

        # knowledge and understanding of theories, concepts, values, principles and rules of European Union law within a global context. # ability to acquire new knowledge and engage in critical evaluation. # critical ability in assessing transnational legal processes # awareness of values of the European Union #. Problem solving, including the ability to identify accurately questions for self-directed research and to identify and retrieve up to date legal information, using hardcopy and electronic sources; as well as ability to identify and rank information and materials from a variety of different sources and disciplines # intellectual independence; viii ability to recognise ambiguity and deal with uncertainty in law, ix ability to produce a synthesis of relevant doctrinal and policy issues, presentation of a reasoned choice between alternative solutions and critical judgement of the merits of particular arguments x ability to apply knowledge and understanding to offer evidenced conclusions, addressing complex actual or hypothetical problems #. Produce word-processed work and present it in an appropriate form; #. Use the web and email.

        Assessment

        Blog (1000 words), semester one (30%)
        Essay (2500 words) semester two (70%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW2054

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Torts
        Overview

        The course covers the fundamental principles of the general law of torts, informed by a theoretical, practical and comparative approach emphasizing the underlying function and role of the law of torts in contemporary society. There is also a recurring stress placed throughout the module on the relationship between the law of contract and tort. Key topics covered in the module include the function and philosophy of torts; the relationship between torts and human rights; negligence; trespass to the person; private/public nuisance; protection of reputation (privacy and defamation); vicarious liability; defences and remedies.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will acquire: (i) an understanding of the principles upon which tort liability is imposed, including the historical, political, social, economic and other factors which may affect the development of such liability, (ii) a knowledge and understanding of selected areas of the law of torts. Lectures to be made available for download via Microsoft Production package, as assisted by QUB Media Services. The first of these learning outcomes will enable students to understand the broad patterns of tort liability and to be able to identify the main policy reasons why the courts or Parliament have developed the scope of tort liability in particular ways. The second learning outcome will enable students, in the context of a given problem or essay question, to identify the relevant area(s) of the law of torts and to apply that law in detail with precision and accuracy

        Skills

        Building on Level 1, students will acquire and develop a wide range of legal and wider employability skills including: Understand the Law of Torts in its wider contexts in terms of links to Contract Law; Identify accurately issues that require researching; Problem Solving; Identify and retrieve up to date legal information; Use relevant primary and secondary legal sources; Recognise and rank items and issues in terms of relevance and importance; Bring together information and materials from a variety of different sources; Act independently in planning and undertaking tasks; Synthesise doctrinal and policy issues in relation to a topic; Judge critically the merits of particular arguments; Present and make a reasoned choice between alternative solutions; Make a personal and reasoned judgment based on an informed understanding of standard arguments in the area of law in question; Reflect on own learning and proactively seek and make use of feedback; Use English proficiently; Time management; Present knowledge or an argument in a way that is comprehensible to others and which is directed at their concerns; Use, present and evaluate information provided in a numerical or statistical form.

        Assessment

        50% Coursework
        50% Examination

        Coursework

        50%

        Written

        50%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW2061

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Criminal Law
        Overview

        Elements of Crime Actu Reus Mens Rea Offences against Property Theft, Burglary and Robbery, Criminal Damage, Non Fatal Offences against the Person, Assault, Aggravated Assault, Sexual Offences, Homicide, Murder, Manslaughter, Inchoate Offences, General Defences.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will acquire: Knowledge of the legal elements of criminal liability, major criminal offences, and general defences. Ability to apply the law to particular cases. Understanding of the reasoning adopted by criminal courts and the context in which they operate.

        Skills

        Case analysis and synthesis. Use and interpretation of statutes. Legal reasoning/problem-solving. Use of online materials to obtain statutes and cases. Reflection on own learning and making use of feedback. Independent study and research. Time management. Team work. Writing. Oral communication.

        Assessment

        90% Coursework
        10% Quiz

        Coursework

        90%

        Written

        10%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW2060

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Company Law and Corporate Governance
        Overview

        This module will introduce students to the foundations of company law. It will introduce students to the role of law in society, specifically in the economy, and to the regulation of corporate governance as a problem addressed both through and beyond company law. The module familiarises students with the corporate person as a concept, with the corporate constitution, with the company’s ‘lifecycle’ from incorporation to winding up and to the roles of and disputes between key stakeholders within the corporate form. The module will also introduce the manner in which corporate actors, mediated through law and regulation, seek to address social relationships, including through human rights and social responsibility initiatives.

        Assessments are designed to draw students towards close readings of cases (MCQs) and towards critical evaluation of company law in context (essay-based exam). The module’s socio-legal ethos will be supported by monthly tutorials that review larger questions of principle underpinning law’s role in regulating the corporate economy.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students who complete this module will be familiar with doctrinal and socio-legal questions related to:
        Key features of company law, as developed in legislation and in elements of case law, focused for example on:
        o Separate corporate personhood and limited liability
        o The corporate constitution – articles of association; balance of powers
        o Directors Duties and the board
        o Disputes within the corporate form including unfair prejudice
        o Mergers and acquisitions
        o Winding up
        • Elements of company law and regulation in society, focused on for instance
        o Corporate reporting and transparency
        o The UK Corporate Governance Code
        o Ideas of compliance in corporate governance
        o Voluntary, sector-specific codes such as the Equator Principles
        o Regulation of business and human rights
        o Broader corporate social responsibility initiatives

        Skills

        Students who have completed the module will demonstrate:
        • knowledge of legislation, cases and codes of which the company law regime and the regulatory regime for the corporate economy more broadly are composed
        • awareness of principles and values of company law in context
        • a degree of commercial awareness in corporate affairs
        • an ability to recognise ambiguity and deal with uncertainty in law
        • an ability to apply knowledge and understanding to offer evidenced conclusions, addressing complex actual or hypothetical problems
        • an ability to communicate both orally and in writing, in relation to legal matters, including an ability to listen and respond to written and oral stimuli including questions and instructions

        Assessment

        Assessments reflecting the learning outcomes

        Coursework

        20%

        Written

        80%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        2

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW2058

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

    • Year 3
      • Research Project A
        Overview

        Researching an approved legal topic under supervision and presenting the results as a dissertation or report.

        Learning Outcomes

        The development of skills in legal research, organisation of materials, presentation of extended arguements, and capacity for independent study.

        Skills

        Literacy, clear thinking, familiarity with legal materials.

        Assessment

        Research Paper.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3001

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Gender and the Law
        Overview

        The module provides students with an understanding of how law affects people differently, depending on gender and the ways in which law contributes to regulating and representing gender. This understanding is not specific to one area of law, rather the course cuts across a number of different areas (such as criminal law, human rights, international law) increasing students’ knowledge and understanding of legal issues more generally at the national and international levels from a gendered perspective. Students will have the opportunity to further evaluate these issues through film and visual representation of the interaction between gender, justice and society. The module introduces students to a number of new and different topics (for example, judicial decision making, the Global South, LGBTQI, kinship and reproduction, the military) from which to interrogate contemporary debates on gender and contribute to the development of students’ critical and analytical skills.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

        The main theoretical approaches to analyses of law, gender and society.
        The relevance of gender issues in the determination of law and legal policy.
        The social and political dimensions of particular areas of substantive law and the relationship to gender.

        Skills

        Students will develop and demonstrate the:
        Ability to critically analyse and make links between theory and practice.
        Ability to identify and understanding of the significance of law in its social context.
        Synthesis of materials from diverse sources; exercise of critical judgement; discernment between the merits of particular arguments.
        Ability to write and speak with care and precision in the analysis and synthesis of the law, policy and theory.
        Ability to identify issues for independent research and to retrieve accurate and relevant sources.

        Assessment

        Coursework (100%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3024

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Public International Law
        Overview

        There has never been a more exciting time to study Public International Law (PIL). Issues of international law and international justice are at the forefront of public debates and feature prominently also in domestic courts to a greater degree than ever before. International law provides the intellectual and the technical underpinnings to large areas of international co-operation. The PIL module covers the major areas of general international law and is not over-specialized. The lectures cover the core topics such as the nature and sources of international law, its relationship with national law but also introduces students to special areas such as international criminal law, and international human rights law. In addition, students will be examining the contextual constraints associated with public international law. The module will also cover the applicable rules governing international relations, and develop an understanding of the specifics of the law-making process in public international law and the intended and unintended consequences of present-day rule-making processes with regards to the politics and philosophy that dominates some of these areas. In sum, the PIL module will enable students to critically examine public international law.

        Learning Outcomes

        - introducing the fundamentals of international law and an evaluation of their content;
        - enhancing student understanding of the manner in which the international system functions;
        - developing an understanding of the normative values of the international system;
        - providing the tools necessary to determine the legality/illegality of any given action;
        - improving student presentation & communication skills through seminar work and simulations;
        - developing advocacy skills through debates, and negotiation simulation;
        - enhancing analytical skills through seminars.

        Skills

        This module provides an introduction to fundamental principles and concepts of public international law and to some current international legal topics. The skills that may be acquired during the course include
        - enhancing analytical skills through seminars, where students will be able to interrogate a topic and engage with the material critically.
        - improving student presentation and communication skills through seminar work and simulations (e.g. class debate);
        - developing advocacy skills through debates, negotiation simulation, and;
        - Develop team working and interpersonal skills through the exercises involving group work (e.g. debate)

        Assessment

        Assessment reflects the learning outcomes and skills.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Competition Law
        Overview

        This module will examine the EU competition law regime governing private market behaviour. Topics covered will include the aims and institutional framework of EC competition law; Article 81 of the EC Treaty prohibiting anti-competitive agreements between undertakings; Article 82 of the EC Treaty prohibiting abuse of a dominant position; enforcement of EC competition law and the approaches towards international competition law.

        Learning Outcomes

        By the end of the module students will be able to:

        L. 1 Explain the origins and general principles of competition law;

        L. 2 Explain the role of the Commission and Courts in the application of Competition law;

        L. 3 Explain and apply the provisions of Article 81 and Article 82 EC;

        L. 4 Analyse the relationship between the Commission and the Member States’ Competition Authorities in the application of Articles 81 and 82 EC;

        L. 5 Understand and appreciate the growing internationalisation of Competition law as a result of increasing economic globalisation.

        Skills

        By the end of the module students should be able to demonstrate the following employability and personal development planning skills:

        (1) Knowledge and Understanding

        (a) Understand the theoretical basis of Competition law;
        (b) Understand the competition provisions of the EC Treaty;
        (c) Understand the scope for development in the internationalisation of competition law;

        (2) Practice: Applied Knowledge and Understanding
        (a) Apply legal knowledge and understanding to a wide range of legal problems drawing on a wide range of sources and coming to reasoned conclusions;
        (b) Analyse the division of powers between the European Commission and Member States;
        (c) Understand and analyse the internationalisation of competition law, including potential solutions to the growing problem.

        (3) Generic Cognitive Skills
        (a) Develop skills of investigation, interpretation and reasoning;
        (b) Undertake critical analysis and evaluation of competition law concepts;
        (c) Evaluate evidence based solutions/responses to defined and/or routine problems;
        (d) Formulate evidence based solutions based on a range of approaches through personal responsibility and initiative.

        (4) Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills
        (a) Make formal and informal presentations in a variety of situations to a range of audiences;
        (b) Communicate reasoned, analytical solutions to a range of legal problems relating to competition law.
        (c) Use a range of routine legal skills and techniques in complex situations;
        (d) Demonstrate ability to use a wide range of databases for independent research.

        (5) Autonomy, Accountability and Working with Others
        (a) Exercise autonomy and initiative with appropriate guidance;
        (b) Take account of individual and others’ performances and contributions in carrying out and evaluating tasks;
        (c) Identify, reflect upon and address personal learning needs.

        Assessment

        Assessment reflects the learning outcomes and skills.

        Coursework

        80%

        Written

        20%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3038

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Research Project B
        Overview

        Researching an approved legal topic under supervision and presenting the results as a dissertation or report.

        Learning Outcomes

        The development of skills in legal research, organization of materials, presentation of extended arguments, and capacity for independent study.

        Skills

        Literacy, clear thinking, familiarity with legal materials.

        Assessment

        Research Paper.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3041

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Contemporary Issues in British and Irish Human Rights
        Overview

        This module will allow students to explore in some depth a variety of issues that raise important and difficult questions in the UK and/or Ireland concerning the extent to which certain claims should be legally protected as human rights claims. It will build on knowledge and skills already transferred to students through their Constitutional Law in Context and Rights and Accountability modules. The content of the module will vary from year to year depending on the issues that are most topical at the time and the staff available to teach on the module, but it is likely that in most years at least two or three weeks of teaching will be devoted to each of the following: (a) the prevention of terrorism, (b) the right to freedom from Torture, (c) the right to education, (d) the right to freedom of expression, and (e) the right to fair trial. The focus will be on how legislative and judicial institutions the UK and Ireland and the European jurisprudence have addressed these matters, with particular emphasis on case law.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of the framework of laws and institutions within which human rights are protected throughout the United Kingdom and Ireland. They will also develop an awareness of the variety of views that can be held on how best to protect the rights in question and of the interests that need to be taken into account when legislators and judges are deciding whether certain claims deserve to be protected under human rights law.

        Skills

        Students will deepen their ability to analyse legislation, to interpret judicial pronouncements, and to develop legal arguments orally and in writing that might persuade policy- and law makers to adopt a different position. Students will acquire a greater ability to present their views persuasively orally and in writing and to undertake research into the legal position in different jurisdictions.

        Assessment

        Students will be required to write an essay not exceeding 4,000 words on one of a number of prescribed themes. For Erasmus students the word limit is 3,000 words.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3056

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Employment Law
        Overview

        This module will expose students to the wide range of laws relating to the world of work. It will introduce them to some of the theories explaining the relationship between employers and employees and the importance of industrial relations more generally. It will then analyse some of the key topics in employment law such as the nature of an employment contract, the legal duties of an employer (especially as regards health and safety), the rights of an employee (especially as regards discrimination and privacy), the law relating to trades unions, the influence of the International Labour Organisation and the European Union in this field, and the means by which employment contracts can be terminated. It will to some extent build upon knowledge gained from the 2nd year module in Contract Law.

        The focus will be on how legislative, administrative and judicial institutions in Northern Ireland (and in England and Wales) have addressed the issues most commonly arising in the employment relationship.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of the framework of laws and institutions within which the employment relationship is conducted in the United Kingdom. They will also develop an awareness of the variety of views that can be held on how best to maintain this relationship at a productive level. The module provides students with an opportunity to consider what policy factors come into play when solving employment disputes both at the individual and at the collective level. The influence of international law on this area of domestic law with be a leitmotiv running through the module.

        Skills

        Students will deepen their ability to analyse legislation, to interpret judicial pronouncements, and to develop legal arguments orally and in writing that might persuade policy- and law makers to adopt a different position. Students will acquire a greater ability to present their views persuasively orally and in writing and to undertake research into the influence of EC, ECHR and international law on the legal position within Northern Ireland. They will also become equipped to enter the world of work with an enhanced understanding of the obligations and responsibilities involved.

        Assessment

        Take home examination 100% (4000 words).

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3058

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Legal Theory
        Overview

        This module is designed to equip students with the skills to better understand law, to ask questions about what law ‘is’ and what it ‘ought’ to be from a variety of perspectives. In doing so, students are encouraged to
        consider their own views and understandings of law, but also to encounter a range of new views and understandings. This involves moving from a ‘black letter’ understanding of law and legal rules to engage with law in a more conceptual, creative and critical way. Students will explore a number of different theoretical perspectives which each provide contrasting ways to think about on law, legal institutions and contemporary legal problems. These perspectives include those drawn from traditional analytical jurisprudence as well as perspectives from critical legal theory. Students will become familiar with the variety of tools which diverse theoretical perspectives and authors offer to interrogate law and ask questions about its everyday operation. The questions these theoretical tools help us to ask include ‘What is law?’, ‘What role does law play in society?’, ‘Is law neutral?’, ‘How do judges decide a case?’, ‘What is the relationship between law and social change?

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of this module students will be able to demonstrate:

        •A knowledge and understanding of a number of theoretical approaches to law.
        •A comprehension of how differing theoretical approaches to law animate a Western understanding of law within a global, social and political context.
        •The ability to critically reflect upon and analyse complex legal theory.
        •The ability to formulate cogent arguments and to draw upon theoretical tools to engage in complex problem solving.
        •Heightened oral, written and research skills through class discussion, group work and coursework.

        Skills

        Successful completion of the module will result in the acquisition and enhancement of the following skills relevant to career development:

        • The ability to analyse social and legal problems by drawing upon philosophical and theoretical materials;
        • Critical conceptual thinking;
        • Interdisciplinary reflection;
        • The ability to construct legal and philosophical arguments;
        • The development of legal reasoning and problem solving;
        • Research and writing skills;
        • Oral communication, presentation and debating skills.

        Assessment

        4,000 word essay worth 100%

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3060

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Criminology : Theory and Practice
        Overview

        This course is designed to offer students an introduction to some of the key issues and controversies surrounding the study of crime from a social scientific perspective. Crime will be understood as a legal and social construct rather than as an unchallengeable fact. Crimes are legally defined, they vary over time and between jurisdictions, they are therefore clearly linked to questions of power and powerlessness, gender, race and a host of other variables. The analysis of the criminal justice process, therefore, will be underpinned by such critical views. These issues will explored through an array of national and international research evidence, and will also draw upon current developments and the lecturers’ own research. Drawing on inter-disciplinary sources and establishing an academic agenda for critical analysis it considers the foundations of and alternatives to criminal justice in the context of a society and social order that is ‘ in transition’. Finally, it seeks to develop interdisciplinary skills and to encourage a full appreciation of the social nature of legal regulation and the role of criminology in understanding and resolving conflict.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of criminological theory and the basics of criminological research, with specific applications to the criminal justice system.

        Skills

        1. to develop a critical understanding and awareness of the substantive module content.
        2. to utilise a range of theoretical and methodological tools in our understanding of criminology and criminal justice.
        3. to utilise a range of social scientific resources in relation to the understanding of a particular topic.
        4. to develop public speaking skills via class discussions and debates.

        Assessment

        Assessment reflects the learning outcomes and skills.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3066

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Sentencing
        Overview

        • Theories of Punishment
        • Sentencing and Human Rights
        • Pre-Sentence Decisions
        • The Sentencing Process
        • Custodial Sentences
        • Non-Custodial Sentences
        • Sentencing the Young Offender

        Learning Outcomes

        By the end of the module the students should have acquired the following:
        • Understanding of the philosophical rationales for the imposition of punishment and of the ways in which they are reflected in the Northern Ireland Sentencing system;
        • Understanding of the relevant provisions of the European Convention on Human Rights and the way in which it impacts on sentencing decisions;
        • Understanding of the ways in which the sentencing process can be affected by decisions made at an earlier stage of the proceedings;
        • Understanding of the law relating to the sentencing process (including the collection of relevant information, the legal constraints on sentencing, and the manner in which the sentence is chosen) and the ability to apply that law in context;
        • Understanding of the social and political factors relating to sentencing, and the way in which they are reflected in the current sentencing system;
        • Understanding of the relevant statutory provisions relating to custodial and non-custodial sentences, and the ability to apply those provisions in context;
        • Understanding of the law relating to the sentencing of the young offender, and the ability to apply it in context.

        Skills

        • Identify accurately issues that require researching
        • Identify and retrieve legal information
        • Use of primary and secondary sources
        • Recognise and rank items and issues in terms of relevance and importance
        • Bring together information and materials from a variety of different sources
        • Act independently in planning and undertaking tasks
        • Synthesise doctrinal and policy issues in relation to a topic
        • Judge critically the merits of particular arguments
        • Present and make a reasoned choice between alternative solutions
        • Reflect on own learning and proactively seek and make use of feedback
        • Use of English
        • Time management
        • Present knowledge or an argument in a way that is comprehensible to others and is directed at their concerns
        • Read and discuss legal materials which are written in technical and complex language
        • Produce word processed essays and text and present such work in an appropriate form
        • Use of the World Wide Web and of e-mail
        • Work in groups as a participant who contributes effectively to the group’s task

        Assessment

        Sentencing Exercise Coursework (100%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3073

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Intellectual Property Law
        Overview

        The course addresses the following topics: intellectual property theory; copyright; passing off; trade marks; image rights; design rights; patents; and the enforcement of intellectual property rights.

        Learning Outcomes

        By the end of this course students should be able to: understand UK and EU law as it applies to the law of copyright, trade marks, design rights, patents and other areas of intellectual property regulation; identify and consider the various justifications and aims that underpin the intellectual property regime; evaluate and criticise constructively recent developments and legal arguments in this domain; research new developments in this area of law.

        Skills

        The skills acquired by students will include: analytical and problem-solving skills; legal research, including web-based research; legal writing.
        These will all be developed when preparing for and participating in class and through the compulsory coursework.

        Assessment

        100% coursework, 1 x 4000 word essay.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3074

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • International Trade Law
        Overview

        Following a brief overview of the events that led to the formulation of World Trade Organisation, the module will concentrate on the substantive obligations in the agreements that form part of the WTO Agreement, including the general principles of most-favoured nation treatment and non-discrimination, subsidies, antidumping and countervailing duties, safeguards, trade in services and trade-related intellectual property rights.

        It will also examine the dispute settlement system of the WTO and consider future needs trends in international trade regulation, including competition law, environmental protection and the growing role of developing countries.

        Learning Outcomes

        By the end of the module, students will be able to:

        - Explain the origins and identify the general principles of WTO law;
        - Explain the functioning of the dispute settlement system of the WTO;
        - Explain and analyse the effect of WTO law on its Contracting Parties;
        - Have an understanding of hte current debates taking place within the WTO in relation to the areas covered.

        Skills

        By the end of the module, students should be able to demonstrate the following employability and personal development planning skills:

        1. Knowledge and Understanding
        a) appreciate the basic aim, function and structure of the WTO legal system
        b) understand the general principles of the WTO legal system
        c) understand the function and working of the dispute settlement system
        d) appreciate the major developments in international trade with a view to future trends in trade regulation.

        2. Practice : Applied Knowledge and Understanding
        a) apply legal knowledge and understanding to a wide range of legal problems drawing on a wide range of sources and coming to reasoned conclusions
        b) analyse the current trends in international trade law and identify future trends

        3. Generic Cognitive Skills
        a) develop skills of investigation, interpretation and reasoning
        b) undertake critical analysis and evaluation of international trade law concepts
        c) evaluate evidence based solutions/responses to defined and/or routine problems
        d) formulate evidence based solutions based on a range of approaches through personal responsibility and initiative

        4. Communication, ICT and Numeracy Skills
        a) Make formal and informal presentations in a variety of situations to a range of audiences
        b) communicate reasoned, analytical solutions to a range of legal problems relating to international trade law
        c) use a range of routine legal skills and techniques in complex situations
        d) demonstrate ability to use a wide range of databases for independent research

        5. Autonomy, Accountability and Working with Others
        a) exercise autonomy and initiative with appropriate guidance
        b) take account of individual and others' performance and contributions in carrying out and evaluating tasks
        c) identify, reflect upon and address personal learning needs

        Assessment

        100% Coursework Assessment

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3077

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • International Humanitarian Law
        Overview

        Atrocities in Syria, Ukraine and Central African Republic involving massacres of civilians, abduction of children, and violations of the laws of war highlight the indiscriminate nature of warfare. International humanitarian law (IHL) is a core component of international law and is supposed to govern the conduct of hostilities (and minimise its excesses). Consideration will thus turn on whether this field can be truly considered humane? The module will begin by charting the history and legal basis of IHL, exploring the work of the Red Cross, the development of the Geneva Conventions, humanitarian intervention, accountability, and key principles in IHL. Further seminars will explore contemporary and technological challenges with conducting hostilities in a humane way through lectures, group work, presentations, and mock simulations.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students with develop:
        • an understanding of the normative values of IHL and understanding of legal basis of IHL; an appreciation of the work of the Red Cross and other international organisations, such as the International Criminal Court, in the promotion and enforcement of IHL;
        • practical knowledge in applying different solutions in IHL in solving problems in armed conflicts.

        Skills

        Students will gain the following skills:
        • a coherent understanding of the theory and practice of the laws and principles of international humanitarian law (IHL);
        • ability to apply knowledge and understanding of IHL in problem solving scenarios as part of a team;
        • an ability to discern relevant primary and secondary materials, which support such principles;
        • critical insights into contemporary developments in IHL and ability to apply independent research skills to produce reasoned and balanced arguments;

        Assessment

        The course will involve twelve weekly two hours seminars to outline and discuss the issues raised by each topic. Seminars are lecturer led, but involve the participation of students through practical exercises, such as discussions, problem questions, case studies, and quizzes through personal response systems. E-learning will enable students to build their understanding in groups and contribute to each others’ learning through the development of monitored discussion forums and wiki entries on Queens’ Online (QOL).

        The assessment will be by 100% examination.

        Coursework

        0%

        Written

        100%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3089

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • International Criminal and Transitional Justice
        Overview

        Since the Second World War international criminal justice has emerged as a body of law to hold individuals responsible for mass atrocities. This module aims to introduce students to the key questions on the relationships between international law, justice and the transition from conflict in the 21st century through an exploration of law, criminological and social theory and case studies. The module adopts a broad interdisciplinary approach to mapping these connected issues and draws on a range of source and geo-political contexts (Latin America and Africa). It touches on contemporary controversies with international justice and domestic political conflicts, such as the intervention of the ICC in Palestine, criminal responsibility child soldiers, and reparations by multinational corporations.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of this module each student should be conversant with:

        1. the theory and practice of international criminal justice and transitional justice;
        2. the broad patterns, dynamics and contexts of contemporary international crimes;
        3. the occurrence of international crimes within different jurisdictions and the work of the international criminal courts and tribunals;
        4. the relevant primary and secondary legal and factual materials to understand the relationship between international, national and local community based conceptions of justice; and
        5. alternative accountability mechanisms beyond international criminal justice.

        Skills

        Students will gain the following skills:
        1. the ability to apply different methods and tools for engaging in independent research on international crimes and developing reasoned conclusions;
        2. develop critical perspectives on debates in criminal and alternative justice responses to such crimes;
        3. critical understanding and application of international criminal law and procedure in solving practical problem scenarios;
        4. communication and advocacy skills developed through debates, moot court sessions and presentations; and
        5. familiarity with online website development tools.

        Assessment

        The course will involve twelve weekly two hour seminars to outline and discuss the issues raised by each topic. Seminars are lecturer led, but involve the participation of students through practical exercises, such as discussions, problem questions, case studies, and quizzes through personal response systems. E-learning will enable students to build their understanding in groups and contribute to each others’ learning through the development of monitored discussion forums and wiki entries on Queens’ Online (QOL).

        The assessment will be one piece of essay coursework (worth 100%).

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3093

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Criminal Liability
        Overview

        This module explores the boundaries of the criminal law examining issues of current controversy. Deciding what to criminalise or decriminalise are important issues for any society. The proper boundaries of the criminal law are often contested with competing ideologies and perspectives offering different viewpoints. The module adopts a doctrinal, socio-legal and philosophical approach to the exploration of these issues. Issues to be examined include: theories of criminalisation; responding to hate crime; responding to stalking and harassment; regulating prostitution; regulating the use of illegal drugs; regulating pornography; the criminalisation of transmission of disease; responding to anti-social behaviour.

        Learning Outcomes

        The learning ouctomes of the course are that students should acquire:
        A. Knowledge and understanding of the boundaries of criminal liability and underlying theory;
        B. Knowledge and understanding of important criminal offences;
        C. Knowledge and understanding of comparative approaches to criminal law;
        D. Knowledge and understanding of reform proposals;
        E. An ability to identify and analyse criminal law issues in factual situations;
        F. An ability to identify and discuss moral, political and philosophical issues within criminal law and to present a reasoned argument on doubtful or controversial issues;
        G. An ability to evaluate academic commentary on key criminal law issues.

        Skills

        • Legal problem-solving. Ability to identify relevant issues, apply relevant concepts, principles & rules, make judgements & reach supported conclusions on the basis of sound & informed reasoning;
        • Critical analysis of the criminal law in theory and practice. Ability to: identify & order issues by relevance and importance; synthesis of materials from diverse sources; exercise of critical judgement - discernment between the merits of particular arguments.
        • Comparative analysis of the law. Ability to compare and contrast how different legal jurisdictions use the criminal law;
        • Ability to write & speak with care and precision in the analysis & synthesis of the law;
        • Ability to structure argument and analysis;
        • Ability to identify issues for research and to retrieve accurate & relevant legal & other sources.

        Assessment

        80% Take Home Examination
        20% Presentation

        Coursework

        0%

        Written

        80%

        Practical

        20%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3088

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Financial Services Law
        Overview

        This course will offer an introduction to the law of finance. Finance is often defined as the backbone of the economy as it provides essential services such as payment or credit intermediation, without which no business would be possible. In recent decades, the volume of legislation on financial law has increased exponentially and it touches virtually every aspect of financial intermediation, from day-to-day financial transactions to the regulation of cryptocurrencies. The objective of the module is to equip students with the analytical tools to navigate the complex world of finance from a legal perspective. The module will offer a broad overview of the three main pillars of financial law: financial institutions, financial transactions, and markets.

        Topics addressed in the course include:

        The structure of financial systems and the relations between Central banks, banks, securities firms, financial investors, depositors, and states.
        The most important types of finance: equity, debt, sovereign debt, and securities.
        The nature of banks, their deposit taking function, and their risks
        Bank and securities prudential regulations
        Corporate governance of financial institutions
        Bank insolvency and resolution
        Deposit insurance
        Money and Payment systems
        Regulation of cross-border banks
        Sovereign debt
        EU and international financial architecture (including IMF)

        Learning Outcomes

        After taking the course the student should acquire:
        A. Knowledge and understanding of the risks affecting the stability of financial systems;
        B. Knowledge and understanding of the most important bank regulations in the UK and the EU;
        C. Knowledge and understanding of comparative approaches to financial regulation (with a specific focus on the US);
        D. Knowledge and understanding of currently unaddressed issues in international finance and the various reform proposals on the table;
        E. An ability to identify and analyse risks in finance and propose practical legal solutions;
        F. An ability to understand and analyse financial transactions and the legal regime applicable to them.

        Skills

        • Legal problem solving. Ability to identify relevant issues, apply relevant concepts, principles and rules, make judgements and reach supported conclusions on the basis of sound and informed reasoning;
        • Ability to understand financial and economic concepts and to dissect them into broader legal concepts
        • Ability to identify economic issues and to propose regulatory and legal solutions to tackle them
        • Critical analysis of financial regulations.
        • Ability to: identify and order issues by relevance and importance; synthesis of materials from diverse sources; exercise of critical judgement - discernment between the merits of particular arguments.
        • Comparative analysis of the law.
        • Ability to write and speak with care and precision in the analysis and synthesis of law and economic concepts;
        • Ability to structure argument and analysis;

        Assessment

        100% Coursework

        Coursework

        0%

        Written

        100%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3099

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • French 3
        Overview

        Building on skills acquired at level 2, this module aims to develop the skills and understanding required to deal with a broad variety of language tasks. Linguistic, sociolinguistic and cultural awareness will be consolidated and deepened. The module will contain the following elements:

        1. Written Language Skills (2 hours per week) which will offer students an opportunity to enrich their linguistic skills, consolidate grammatical awareness and develop facility in handling the structures of standard, modern French, across a variety of genres, by means of practical engagement with a range of texts carefully selected for both their linguistic interest (varying in style and register) and the insights they offer into aspects of contemporary France and the Francophone world. Emphasis is placed on accuracy, fluent and idiomatic expression, and linguistic flair. A variety of language acquisition and development methods will be employed: grammar practice, editing work, essay-writing, translation into English and into French.

        2. Spoken Language (1 hour per week), which will focus on aspects of contemporary France and the Francophone world, with the aim of training students to speak accurately and fluently in French, to express a range of different ideas and opinions, and to organise material logically and coherently when presenting. This component of the module includes a presentation and extended discussion.

        3. Contextual Study (1hr per week). This component, which will vary across the two semesters, will deepen and contextualise the other elements of the module by placing them in a broader cultural context and will include, for example, literary texts, films, art and linguistics. A specific languages for special purposes strands equip students in law or business with skills for legal and professional contexts. This element includes an essay in the target language.

        Learning Outcomes

        Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of the modules students should:
        1) be able to demonstrate a high level of fluency, accuracy and spontaneity in written and oral French, including the use of a broad variety of linguistic structures and vocabulary;
        2) be able to deal with a broad variety of material in the target language, including material which is complex and abstract, and which involves a variety of genres and registers; 3) be able to demonstrate an advanced knowledge of the structures of the language and their broader linguistic context and the ability to use appropriate reference works effectively;
        4) be able to structure and present arguments at a high level in a range of formats and registers.

        Skills

        On successful completion of the modules students should have developed the following range of skills: Communication skills; translation skills; textual analysis; essay writing; lexicographical skills; IT skills; presentation skills; employability skills, such as report writing and editing skills; problem solving and critical thinking.

        Assessment

        Completion and submission of continual assessment and coursework; written exam; oral exam

        Coursework

        35%

        Written

        40%

        Practical

        25%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        40

        Module Code

        FRH3101

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        Yes

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Clinical Law
        Overview

        This course blends theory with practice, and is delivered in partnership with the Legal Support Project (LSP) of Law Centre NI (LCNI). Students will spend 2 x 4hr periods per teaching week in the LSP, providing supervised assistance on social security casework. Weekly tasks must be completed to the standard required by the terms of the Service Level Agreement between the School of Law and LCNI. Supervision is provided by LCNI staff, who will also deliver a frontloaded training programme (20 hours, delivered in weeks 1 and 2; the School of Law also takes classes during those weeks). This training programme will address: (i) access to justice and pursuing strategic litigation in a law centre setting; and (ii) areas of clinical work - the law on Employment and Support Allowance, Disability and Living Allowance, and Personal Independence Payment (PIP); Social Security Appeals Tribunals (practice and procedure); client care in a pro bono setting.

        The practical aspects of the course are complemented by set academic literature on access to justice and strategic litigation, ensuring that students are able to reflect critically and systematically on all aspects of clinical practice. Students will complete a criticial case note paper to demonstrate learning outcomes associated with this part of the course.

        Learning Outcomes

        On completion of the module students will be able to:

        Demonstrate awareness and understanding of issues around access to justice and strategic litigation, and the nature, aims and context of law centre practice;
        Plan and undertake casework under supervision, asking cogent questions and identifying gaps in their own knowledge and understanding;
        Complete casework tasks to a high standard, developing awareness of professional standards, competencies and ethics;
        Present information and ideas in a coherent and accurate manner, orally and in written form.

        Skills

        On completion of the module students will be able to:

        Work collaboratively under supervision, listening and responding to written and oral instructions, and making effective use of feedback;
        Respect deadlines and professional commitments, and operate effectively within a context of professional standards and regulation;
        Engage with their personal/professional development.

        Assessment

        Attend at least 22/24 4hr practice-components at LCNI, completing sessions to the standard required by the SLA.

        Assessment reflects the learning outcomes and skills.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3102

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Regulating Commercial Sex
        Overview

        The issue of sex is perhaps the one area of human behaviour that has been historically subject to particularly high levels of formal and informal regulation including the law, the police and official agencies but also via cultural norms and mores. This regulation extends to the arena of sexual commerce generally (pornography, lap dancing and strip clubs, massage parlours, Internet based web cams) but also to the regulation of commercial sex which usually involves the exchange of money or other goods for the provision of direct and physical sexual services. In many respects the provision of commercial sex and how it is policed and regulated has been challenged fundamentally by the growth of the digital economy and the contribution of the Internet to the growth and development of new sex markets. The module focuses primarily on developments that have occurred in the UK and Ireland but also draws upon comparative international evidence where required. The module considers how debates about commercial sex are intertwined with notions of sexuality more generally and reflect gendered norms around what is perceived as appropriate sexual conduct. The module provides a historical overview of how female commercial sex came to be regulated in Ireland and the UK in ways that did not apply to that of males before moving on to consider a number of regulatory models (abolitionism, decriminalisation, legalisation) adopted in a number of jurisdictions. The nature of commercial sex is considered theoretically by drawing on competing explanations from within feminism (i.e. between second, third and fourth wave feminism) but also to those sociological and socio-legal perspectives that view commercial sex as a form of ‘work’. The module challenges our understanding of commercial sex as an exclusively ‘female’ domain and investigates the role of males and transgendered individuals in the provision of commercial sexual services since they have remained absent from much of these discussions. As a fundamental starting point the module adopts a reflexive stance to argue that a full understanding of the nature of commercial sex can only be obtained by paying attention to the voices and views of those that participate in it. As such, the module takes an evidence-based approach arguing that research evidence not ‘opinion’ should be used as the basis for public policy.

        Broad thematic areas of the module will include:

        Theoretical approaches to commercial sex and its regulation (feminist, socio-legal, sociological)
        Models of regulating commercial sex: abolitionism, legalisation, decriminalisation
        Modes of commercial sex: Street, Indoor, Internet based
        Male sex work, masculinities and gendered subjectivities
        Regulating commercial sex in comparative perspective (a case study analysis of various international jurisdictions)
        Regulating commercial sex in historical perspective
        The emergence of the digital economy and the Internet in the creation of new sex markets
        Human trafficking and sexual slavery
        The intersection of religion and morality in debates about commercial sex
        The role of evidence and research in public policy

        Learning Outcomes

        Students undertaking this module will be in a position to:

        1. Demonstrate their knowledge and comprehension of the legal frameworks governing the regulation of commercial sex in a number of jurisdictions.

        2. Demonstrate that they can apply this knowledge to the actual operation and the political economy of commercial sex markets and to situate this within various theoretical perspectives drawn from law, sociology and a number of other disciplines.

        3. Analyse the specific advantages and disadvantages of each regulatory model in terms of their impact on sex workers, broader notions of harm reduction and where these models sit with reference to national and international legal benchmarks.

        4. Synthesise a range of data from interdisciplinary studies to make an evidence-based and informed judgement to assess both the impact and prevalence of commercial sex in a range of jurisdictions.

        5. Use their evaluative skills to make an overall assessment of the efficacy and effectiveness of each regulatory model and to identify areas of best practice internationally.

        Skills

        Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information in developing critical understanding of current problems in the regulation of commercial sex and demonstrate an awareness of the wider socio-political and economic context within which sex markets operate.

        Critically analyse, evaluate, interpret and apply conceptual information to commercial sex and its regulation using sound methodological frameworks and forming new hypotheses.

        Demonstrate the linkages between commercial sex and broader issues in the regulation of sexuality more generally.

        Recognise potential alternative conclusions; provide supporting socio-legal reasoning for each; and identify the strengths and weaknesses of opposing arguments and the opportunities for negotiation.

        Ability to evaluate complex policy and legal evidence in relation to the operation of sex markets and the regulation of commercial sex.

        Ability to apply complex theoretical frameworks including those developed from law, sociology and criminology in the subject area.

        Develop effective oral communication skills during class and group discussion.

        To develop advanced written skills in the written assessment.

        Ability to be self-directed and exercise initiative.

        Ability to think critically, creatively and holistically.

        Assessment

        Assessment reflects the learning outcomes and skills.

        Coursework

        50%

        Written

        50%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3108

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Law & Psychology
        Overview

        This module provides students with an introduction to the role of psychology within the law and in the operation of legal systems. It aims to explore both the presence of psychological concepts within the substance of the law and the ways in which a range of legal skills is imbued with processes and dynamics that have psychological underpinnings. Group work and problem-based learning (PBL) approaches will form an integral part of the module.

        The module will begin with an examination of skills development within a group context, including (but not limited to): individual learning styles, formation of group identity, legal research, individual roles within groups, conflict resolution and communication (oral and written). There will be discussion of psychological and organisational theories throughout.

        In the second part of the module, the focus will be on areas of the law where psychological factors (including emotion, group behaviour, mental capacity) play a role, for example in criminal law, property law and obligations. There will also be an examination of decision-making processes within the justice system (e.g. juries), lie detection, eyewitness testimony and the role of the forensic psychologist.

        The final part of the module will explore a mixed-subject PBL scenario, in which students identify key legal issues and conduct research into both substantive and normative areas of law, including the relevant psychological components. There will be opportunities for students to engage in presentations within class, based on group work.

        Learning Outcomes

        Demonstrate knowledge and comprehension of the role of psychological concepts and processes within the law and in the operation of legal systems.

        Apply this knowledge to problem scenarios and consider how this sits within various theoretical perspectives across disciplines.

        Analyse data from a range of sources including legal, psychological and interdisciplinary studies.

        Synthesise information from interdisciplinary studies and evaluate the extent to which psychological concepts and processes are pervasive within the law.

        Reflect actively on learning throughout the module, drawing upon experiences of individual and collaborative work.

        Engage in group work / problem-based learning (PBL) and apply psychological and organisational theories to their experience of this.

        Skills

        By the end of the module the learner will be able to:

        Develop group work capabilities in order to maximise output in terms of knowledge, analysis and synthesis of information.

        Enhance the above capabilities by exploring sources and problem scenarios, drawing from a range of core legal topics, including those with psychological components.

        Appreciate areas of overlap between law and psychology, and evaluate the role of emotional intelligence within the operation of the law.

        Apply group work skills in PBL scenarios, focusing on the analysis of key information and identification of topics for further examination.

        Expand upon existing skills around self-directed and collaborative learning.

        Think critically and creatively about the material encountered within the module, within an interdisciplinary framework.

        Develop conflict-resolution skills within a group work environment.

        Further develop their writing skills in the formal assessments.

        Enhance oral presentation skills in class and within group work settings.

        Develop and consolidate a range of transferable legal skills in preparation for further legal education (for example SQE2, LPC, study at IPLS) or other employment routes.

        Assessment

        Assessment for this module will take the form of two assignments, which together constitute 100% of the module mark. Participation in group work activities.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3111

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Medical Law & Ethics
        Overview

        NONE

        Learning Outcomes

        NONE

        Skills

        NONE

        Assessment

        NONE

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3112

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Housing Law and Policy
        Overview

        This course will focus primarily on substantive issues relating to Housing Law and Policy as it applies to the public and private rental sectors here in the UK.

        Specific areas that will be covered include:


        Housing Law and Policy Context
        • The nature of Housing Law vs Housing Policy.
        • Rental v owner-occupied market.

        Public v Private Rental: Access and Regulation
        • Access to and regulation of the social housing sector (Local Authority Housing, Registered Social Landlords (RSLs)).
        • Access to and regulation of the private rental sector.
        • Homelessness
        • Multiple occupation and overcrowding

        Security of Tenure in the Public and Private Rental Sectors: Rights and Responsibilities
        • Grounds for possession and eviction in the public rental sector.
        • Anti-social behaviour.
        • Grounds for possession and eviction in the private rental sector
        • Possession claims and human rights.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of the legal, regulatory and policy landscapes that have shaped and continue to develop the housing sector here in the UK. From the outset, students will be able to discern the key differences in the policies and regulations that apply to the owner-occupied and rental markets. This course will also equip students with knowledge of any regional differences that may apply in these areas between England &Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland. Further, as this course focuses primarily on the public and private rented sector students will know and understand the statutory provisions and case law that apply in the following key areas:
        • Homelessness
        • Multiple occupation and overcrowding
        • Grounds for possession and eviction in the public and private rental sectors.
        • Anti-social behaviour.
        • The application of the Human Rights Act 1998 in public sector and lord/tenant possession claims.

        Skills

        Students will acquire the following skills:

        *The ability to identify and locate relevant government policies and key statutory provisions pertaining to substantive issues (outlined above) within the area of Housing Law and Policy using electronic and paper sources.
        *Be able to research independently in an area of law not previously studied.
        *Plan and undertake research towards assessment which will also develop students’ ICT skills.
        *Amalgamate and synthesise information and materials from a variety of different sources.
        *Be able to critically analyse the laws and policies that apply in this area by using relevant scholarly literature.
        *Formulate comprehensible and well-structured arguments using suggested materials and materials sought beyond the module content.
        *Judge critically the merits of a particular argument.
        *Oral communication, by way of discussion of key issues in a large group setting.

        Assessment

        Obtain an overall pass mark of 40% in module assessment.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3114

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Consumer Law and Policy
        Overview

        This module aims to provide students with awareness and understanding of consumer right protection legislation and policy, the underpinning economic and social rationales as well as practical application in a rage of realistic scenarios. Consumer law regulates great many daily transactions and activities. These include sale of goods and services (inclusive of online shopping) and consumer financing and credit.

        This course has a strong contemporary focus. Apart from necessary familiarisation with theory, real-world, everyday life problems will be used to discuss appropriateness and actual application of existing protections and to identify their shortcomings, areas in need of further legislative intervention. Therefore, apart from providing theoretical understand of consumer law and policy, this module offers the potential to empower you as a consumer and prepare you to assertively face some of the challenges consumer dealings may present to you in the future (regardless of the career path you chose to follow).

        Everyday examples of consumer protection may relate to, for example, shopping online, misleading advertising, flights cancelations, protections offered under credit cards, problems with holiday bookings, post-purchase quality problems as well as options generally available to consumers in case of small, everyday disputes.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will be able to:
        - outline and explore key existing sources of consumer protection legislation,
        - explain and critically engage with rationales behind consumer law and policy, inclusive of its progressive potential and relationship with broader social policies (such as dealing with social exclusion),
        - analyse a range of problems arising from various everyday transactions, identify relevant rules in such cases and apply them accordingly with a view to formulate advise/ develop practical solutions
        - present inferences of legal analysis in a manner accessible to general public, non-legal audience

        Skills

        Students will be able to:
        - formulate and present arguments orally, in writing and in a visual form; and to different audiences
        - identify and apply legal principles and case law to practical problems
        - polish a range of routine legal skills and techniques in various practical scenarios
        - read critically and assess the validity of competing arguments on legal and policy issues from various sources (such as legislation, policy briefs, advocacy materials),
        - work independently to set deadlines

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Practice of Public Law Northern Ireland
        Overview

        The objective of this course is to skill students up as practical public lawyers. This course builds on the public law courses taught at level one, namely Constitutional Law in Context and Rights and Accountability. It is designed to complement the students’ existing knowledge of the institutions of government and judicial review, with a practice-focussed grounding in the public law of Northern Ireland for those who wish to make it a career focus.

        The current arrangements for devolved government in Northern Ireland are only twenty-two years old, and are based on a unique model of interlinking devolved, national and trans-national institutions. This course will provide the tools for those who wish to play a part in the public law sphere as a lawyer, judge, politician, civil servant, special advisor, lobbyist, activist or commentator. Whatever the individual’s career goals or political perspective, there is a common set of legal skills which are required to achieve social and political objectives through Northern Ireland’s political and legal institutions. Gaining an in-depth understanding of how to achieve things in the political space using Northern Ireland’s institutions will also provide transferable skills and comparative knowledge which will be of interest to students who wish to play a similar role in other jurisdictions.

        The course leader is a senior government lawyer with insight into the worlds of government policymaking, legislation and judicial decision-making and the course will be rooted in practical examples that will allow the a group to explore how each aspect of the Northern Ireland devolved institutions work in the real world using examples drawn from the uniquely challenging context of Brexit, Covid restrictions and constitutional discontents in the United Kingdom and further afield. The legal underpinnings of Northern Ireland’s institutions of government are complex and sophisticated as a fighter plane. This course will allow students to get into the cockpit and experience how it operates in battle conditions.

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Have an in-depth understanding of the Northern Ireland devolved settlement (NIDS) and the legal instruments which create it;
        2. Have the ability to interpret and evaluate primary legal sources, both statutory and judicial.
        3. Have an understanding of the NIDS in operation, and be able to apply that understanding to solving simulated practice tasks at each stage of the policy- and law-making process.
        4. Apply legal knowledge in a range of different contexts and communicate it appropriately to different audiences.
        5. Understand the NIDS as an example of constitutionalism, be able to critically evaluate strengths and weaknesses and apply learning to other contexts.
        6. Understand the legal and ethical principles, and constraints, which govern the various actors in the public law space, and the significance of both ethical and legal accountability mechanisms.

        Skills

        1. Identify and analyse the factual context of legal problems, identify evidence gaps and evaluate reliability of factual narratives;
        2. Build on existing research skills to identify and analyse relevant primary and secondary legal sources to solve legal problems.
        3. Use online resources and social media to build an up-to-the-minute understanding of developing legal issues and debates, evaluating reliability of contributors accurately.
        4. Analyse and apply legal doctrine to a factual matrix to develop solutions to legal problems.
        5. Resolve competing arguments;
        6. Synthesise legal knowledge from different sources with other kinds of evidence to generate achievable solutions to policy problems.
        7. Understand the value of risk- and option-based analysis in solving legal and policy problems.
        8. Judge critically and evaluate legal and policy options.
        9. Apply existing knowledge of constitutional principle to critically evaluate student’s own solutions and responses to issues studied.
        10. Act independently in planning and undertaking tasks.
        11. Build skill in time management, prioritisation of tasks and resilience under pressure.
        12. Demonstrate capability in team-working, allocation of tasks and collaboration in problem-solving.
        13. Use specialist and technical language proficiently in relation to public law.
        14. Present knowledge and argument clearly and persuasively for professional and non-specialist audiences alike.
        15. Demonstrate understanding of the ethical and legal constraints on actors in the public law sphere.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3133

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Equity & Trusts
        Overview

        This module deals with the rules and principles governing trusts. The syllabus focuses on three broad aACreas:
        1. the requirements for establishing a valid trust including express trusts; purpose trusts (charitable and private purpose); resulting trusts; and constructive trusts;
        2. the powers and obligations of trustees; and
        3. the remedies available when trustees act improperly.

        Learning Outcomes

        1. Classify types of trusts and identify their main distinctive features and purposes;
        2. Identify and evaluate the development of principles in equity and trusts law in contemporary contexts.
        3. Explain how breaches of trusts arise and identify appropriate remedies;
        4. Explore key issues in judicial decision making, including ethical and societal considerations and demonstrate knowledge of the wider academic debates.

        Skills

        1. Acquire problem-solving techniques and be able to present coherent, concise legal arguments;
        2. Summarise key arguments advanced in judicial opinions and academic writings;
        3. Distinguish lines of argument and judge relative strengths and weaknesses;
        4. Use appropriate legal terminologies specific to the law of equity and trusts.

        Assessment

        100% Examination

        Coursework

        0%

        Written

        100%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3126

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Land Law
        Overview

        The module will cover Land Law in Northern Ireland and in England and Wales and will include the topics of tenure and estates; registration of title; licences and proprietary estoppel; co-ownership; landlord and tenant law; easements; freehold covenants; and mortgages

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will acquire knowledge and understanding of the key concepts of property, and the basic structures of the property laws of Northern Ireland and England; core rules and principles of the current land laws of Northern Ireland and England, and (where appropriate) will be able to differentiate the rules of these jurisdictions in a critical and comparative context. Students will also acquire the ability to: apply existing rules of land law to complex legal problems; identify the need for and discuss strategies for land law reform, and analyse the operation of existing rules on a theoretical, doctrinal, and societal level; and plan and conduct independent reading on difficult questions of land law doctrine.

        Skills

        Upon completion of this module, students should be able to demonstrate:

        Intellectual independence including the ability to answer cogent questions about land law, identify gaps in their own knowledge and acquire new knowledge, and engage in critical analysis and evaluation.

        Self-management, including an ability to reflect on their own learning, make effective use of feedback, a willingness to acknowledge and correct errors and an ability to work collaboratively.

        Awareness of principles and values of land law.

        Knowledge and understanding of theories, concepts, values, principles and rules of land law.

        The ability to study land law in depth and in context.

        The ability to recognise ambiguity and deal with uncertainty in law.

        The ability to present a reasoned choice between alternative solutions and critical judgement of the merits of particular arguments.
        The ability to apply knowledge and understanding to offer evidenced conclusions, addressing complex actual or hypothetical problems.

        The ability to communicate both orally and in writing, in relation to legal matters, including an ability to listen and respond to written and oral stimuli including questions and instructions.

        Assessment

        Written Examination 100%

        Coursework

        0%

        Written

        100%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3127

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Core

      • Company Law and Corporate Governance
        Overview

        This module will introduce students to the foundations of company law. It will introduce students to the role of law in society, specifically in the economy, and to the regulation of corporate governance as a problem addressed both through and beyond company law. The module familiarises students with the corporate person as a concept, with the corporate constitution, with the company’s ‘lifecycle’ from incorporation to winding up and to the roles of and disputes between key stakeholders within the corporate form. The module will also introduce the manner in which corporate actors, mediated through law and regulation, seek to address social relationships, including through human rights and social responsibility initiatives.

        Assessments are designed to draw students towards close readings of cases (MCQs) and towards critical evaluation of company law in context (essay-based exam). The module’s socio-legal ethos will be supported by monthly tutorials that review larger questions of principle underpinning law’s role in regulating the corporate economy.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students who complete this module will be familiar with doctrinal and socio-legal questions related to:
        Key features of company law, as developed in legislation and in elements of case law, focused for example on:
        o Separate corporate personhood and limited liability
        o The corporate constitution – articles of association; balance of powers
        o Directors Duties and the board
        o Disputes within the corporate form including unfair prejudice
        o Mergers and acquisitions
        o Winding up
        • Elements of company law and regulation in society, focused on for instance
        o Corporate reporting and transparency
        o The UK Corporate Governance Code
        o Ideas of compliance in corporate governance
        o Voluntary, sector-specific codes such as the Equator Principles
        o Regulation of business and human rights
        o Broader corporate social responsibility initiatives

        Skills

        Students who have completed the module will demonstrate:
        • knowledge of legislation, cases and codes of which the company law regime and the regulatory regime for the corporate economy more broadly are composed
        • awareness of principles and values of company law in context
        • a degree of commercial awareness in corporate affairs
        • an ability to recognise ambiguity and deal with uncertainty in law
        • an ability to apply knowledge and understanding to offer evidenced conclusions, addressing complex actual or hypothetical problems
        • an ability to communicate both orally and in writing, in relation to legal matters, including an ability to listen and respond to written and oral stimuli including questions and instructions

        Assessment

        Assessments reflecting the learning outcomes

        Coursework

        0%

        Written

        100%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3129

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • EU Law
        Overview

        This 20 credit module offers an introduction to European Union law in a changing world. It is divided into three parts. The initial lectures introduce the European Union as a polity, the legal framework of its institutions (role of the five core institutions Council, European Council, European Commission, European Parliament and Court of Justice of the European Union, legislative process, judicial proceedings) and its values (including a short reference to the role of citizenship and human rights protection). The module continues with lectures introducing the fundamentals of the Internal Market, comprising the socio-economic of the Internal Market in comparison with economic integration in the WTO and EFT, basic structure of economic freedoms, case law on free movement of goods, case law and at least one piece of secondary law for free movement of workers). It concludes lectures covering a critical assessment of the interaction of institutional and substantive law, focusing on the effect of EU law in its Member States, comparing it to the functioning of international law beyond the EU, as well as critical aspect of the EU’s legitimacy.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students understand the role and cooperation of the EU’s institutions, in comparison with international organisations and the understand the interaction of EU law and polity in law making and adjudication at EU level. Students are introduced to the socio-economic basis for transnational economic integration, and the legal framework of the EU internal market, and can apply two of the economic freedoms to a problem scenario. Students are able to critically access the interaction of substantive and institutional EU law, are able to answer problem questions on the effects of EU law, and discuss critically the EUs legitimacy from a constitutional standpoint.

        Skills

        # knowledge and understanding of theories, concepts, values, principles and rules of European Union law within a global context. # ability to acquire new knowledge and engage in critical evaluation. # critical ability in assessing transnational legal processes # awareness of values of the European Union #. Problem solving, including the ability to identify accurately questions for self-directed research and to identify and retrieve up to date legal information, using hardcopy and electronic sources; as well as ability to identify and rank information and materials from a variety of different sources and disciplines # intellectual independence; viii ability to recognise ambiguity and deal with uncertainty in law, ix ability to produce a synthesis of relevant doctrinal and policy issues, presentation of a reasoned choice between alternative solutions and critical judgement of the merits of particular arguments x ability to apply knowledge and understanding to offer evidenced conclusions, addressing complex actual or hypothetical problems #. Produce word-processed work and present it in an appropriate form; #. Use the web and email.

        Assessment

        Blog (1000 words) (30%)

        Essay (2500 words) (70%)

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3125

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Evidence & Criminal Procedure
        Overview

        The module covers a range of issues in relation to criminal proceedings and the rules of evidence. It will consider the rules governing criminal investigations, prosecutions and the criminal trial. The module may cover areas of criminal procedure and evidential rules including the burden and standard of proof; rules circumscribing police powers, PACE, the admissibility of evidence, the right to silence; the admissibility of confessions; improperly obtained evidence; character evidence; cross-examination; witnesses and aspects of the trial process.

        Learning Outcomes

        To analyse the rules of evidence and criminal proceedings in common law adjudication, to examine the issues and values which underlie the rules and to consider options for reform.

        Skills

        Students will be given an opportunity to develop a wide range of legal and general intellectual skills, with particular emphasis on the following: a) problem solving, application of law to complex problem situations; b) critical analysis and awareness, particularly in relation to criminal procedure and the role of evidence in the administration of criminal justice; c) case and statute analysis; d) oral and written communication.

        Assessment

        Assessment will be by 100% open book written examination

        Coursework

        0%

        Written

        100%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3128

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Climate Emergency
        Overview

        A critical introduction to law and society’s responses to the climate emergency and calls for ‘system change’, focusing on socio-economic and ecological transitions. The module will aim to enhance the ecological literacy of law students to assist critical thinking about the origins and meaning of law, the changing role and demands on law, and the role of legal pluralism (the pluriverse (Escobar) in navigating societal transitions.

        a. Ecology and the history of our legal traditions
        b. The scope and limits of Environmental Law
        c. Planetary Boundaries (Rockstrom et al. 2009)
        d. Law, Systems and System Change: Sustainable Development Goals
        e. Law and the pluriverse
        f. Negotiating just transitions: climate negotiating skills

        - Law and climate change (multi-level governance)
        - Law and the wellbeing economy
        - Law, inequality and post-growth
        - Law and energy justice
        - Law and the commons
        - Law and the Rights of Nature

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will be expected to emerge from the Module with:-

        a. A critical understanding of the social and ecological history of jurisprudence

        b. An appreciation of the scope and limits of environmental law

        c. An understanding of the wider challenges to our legal system posed by the climate emergency and calls for socio-economic and ecological systems change

        d. A basic understanding of law and the pluriverse (critical legal pluralism in the context of indigenous and other non-Western legal approaches to the climate emergency)

        e. An understanding of the emerging role of law and the ‘just transition’ including calls for transitions to a wellbeing economy, post-growth and post-extractivism.

        f. An understanding of emergent jurisprudence on the commons, the rights of nature and rights to a healthy environment.

        Skills

        a. Ecological Literacy within the context of the climate emergency and calls for socio-economic and legal system change.

        b. Historical and critical knowledge of the ecological history of Western Jurisprudence.

        c. Negotiating skills in the context of international climate politics.

        d. Introductory skills in the field of legal pluralism (e.g. an ability to work with and through encounters with non-Western legal traditions and approaches to ecology and wellbeing).

        Assessment

        All students will be expected to complete a report (80%) on their participation in a climate change negotiation simulation (www.climateinteracitve.org). The structured report will be designed to ensure that students draw on a range of learning from the module, including a focus on one of the following:

        a. Law and systems thinking
        b. Law and climate justice
        c. Law and the climate emergency
        d. Law and economics in a time of transition
        e. Law and the commons
        f. Law and energy justice
        g. Law and Ecocide

        Coursework

        80%

        Written

        20%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Law of Coroners and Inques
        Overview

        Indicative syllabic content includes:

        1) The origins of the coronial jurisdiction;
        2) The modern office of coroner;
        3) The jurisdiction of the coroner;
        4) Reporting of deaths;
        5) Conduct of the Inquest: Practicalities and Procedure (I/II);
        6) The inquest verdict;
        7) Challenging coronial decisions;
        8) Human rights and the coroner’s court
        9) Medical inquests;
        10) Notable Inquest: Case Study
        11) The case for reform: comparative analysis with England

        Learning Outcomes

        (1) Demonstrate a knowledge and critical understanding of the historical development, principles, and context of the law relating to coroners and inquests;

        (2) Understand and evaluate the relevance of the coronial jurisdiction in the legal system and in the study of law;

        (3) Assess and weigh legal materials in order to recognise ambiguity and uncertainty in the law relating to coroners and inquests;

        (4) Identify and evaluate potential alternative conclusions and provide supporting reasons for them;

        (5) Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the procedural practices of the coroners court.

        Skills

        (1) Legal problem solving: develop ability to identify relevant issues, apply relevant concepts, principles and rules, make judgements and reach supported conclusions;

        (2) Ability to understand concepts, principles and context of law relating to coroners and inquests;

        (3) Critical analysis of the law relating to coroners and, as appropriate, the case for reform;

        (4) Ability to: identify and order issues by relevance and importance; synthesis of materials from diverse sources; and identify and weigh merits of scholarly perspectives.

        (5) Ability to write and speak with care and precision in the analysis and synthesis of coronial law concepts.

        Assessment

        No specific elements beyond summative assessment identified.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Equality in Practice
        Overview

        This module is designed for learners who wish to develop an interdisciplinary understanding of equality, diversity and inclusion and to explore strategies for change.

        The module will provide learners with the knowledge and understanding needed to deal effectively with issues of equality, diversity and inclusion at all levels of society, the community and the workplace.

        Learners will draw on academic literature and practical case studies to identify and address challenges in a variety of environments. Case studies, guest lectures and site visits will be used to give students a real appreciation of the importance of equality, diversity and inclusion and the impact that supportive policies have on organisational culture. Interaction with leaders who have championed change in their own professional
        context will equip learners with the essential competencies necessary to meet the challenges of today's rapidly changing world.

        Students will engage in a value mapping exercise to reflect upon their own perceptions concerning aspects of equality, diversity and inclusion to understand the legal, social and cultural factors arising and they will consider foundational theoretical concepts of equality. The module will also introduce the students to the dynamics and processes implicit to inequality and social exclusion and to make them aware of the complexity of
        the conceptualisation and operationalisation of equality and social exclusion.

        The module will be divided into three parts. The first part of the module will introduce students to the various theories of equality such as formal equality, substantive equality,distributive equality, equality of opportunity, equality of outcomes, intersectionality etc.

        The second part of the module will focus on how a variety of organisations both public and private develop strategies to work on equality, diversity and inclusion both within their organisation and in how they carry out their work.
        The final part of the module will involve guest lectures to allow students to engage with leaders who have championed change within their own organisations (some guest lectures will be delivered live online to facilitate those speakers outside Northern Ireland).

        Pending the situation with Covid-19 in Spring 2023 it is also hoped to have two class site visits. These class site visits would be to large organisations who have implemented large scale successful equality, diversity and inclusion practices in their organisations.

        Students would get to hear from managers, employees and service users of these organisations while also viewing physical spaces that have implemented the principles of equality, diversity and inclusion.
        (Re the feasibility of the site visits - the module leader is a board member of the National Women’s Council of Ireland, as such there will be no issues with securing guest speakers or site visits.)

        Learning Outcomes

        Demonstrate knowledge and comprehension of the various theories of equality and related laws.

        Apply this knowledge to real life organisations and workplaces and consider how the theoretical perspectives relate to real life situations.
        Analyse data from a range of sources including legal, historical, economic and interdisciplinary studies.

        Synthesise information from interdisciplinary studies and evaluate the extent to which theories of equality, diversity and inclusion are pervasive within the law.

        Reflect actively on learning throughout the module, drawing upon experiences of individual and collaborative work, engagement with theory, the law, guest lectures and site visits.

        Engage in group work and reflect on their own experiences of equality, diversity, and inclusion in order to compare and contrast their

        Skills

        By the end of the module the learner will be able to:

        Develop the skills of applying the law and theories of equality to real life scenarios to maximise output in terms of knowledge, analysis, and synthesis of information.

        Enhance the critical analysis skills developed in earlier modules of their degree.

        Appreciate the overlap between law and theories of equality and evaluate the role and application of theories of equality in a variety of situations.
        Expand upon existing skills around self-directed and collaborative learning.
        Think critically and creatively about the material encountered within the module, within an interdisciplinary framework.

        Develop conflict-resolution skills within a group work environment.
        Further develop their writing skills in the formal assessments.
        Enhance oral presentation skills in class and within group work settings and in preparation of the podcast.

        Develop and consolidate a range of transferable legal skills in preparation for further legal education (for example SQE2, LPC, study at IPLS) or other employment routes.

        Assessment

        Assessment for this module will take the form of two assignments, which together constitute 100% of the module mark (see Section 4: Assessment, below).

        Participation in group work activities.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Law, Literature, and Social Ju
        Overview

        This module will aim to offer students the opportunity to engage in critical analysis of key works of ‘law-heavy’ literature (and some works of popular fiction) that are relevant to issues of human rights violations and social justice (having sparked wider social or legal reforms, and/or controversial discourses) e.g. Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Attwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, Morrison’s Beloved; Ishiguru’s Never Let Me Go, Shelley’s Frankenstein. After close reading of relevant excerpts – and the weekly lecture - students will critique the role and nature of law, rights, and legal processes (as reflected in selected works of ‘protest literature’).

        The overarching theme is that of human vulnerability, arranged by weekly lectures and fortnightly seminars, grounded in group discussions and debates to identify and analyse issues of social injustice and the need for law/policy reforms. Issues are likely to include:

        a. Gender (e.g. Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre; Attwood’s The Testaments; CEDAW);
        b. The voice of the child (e.g. Godden’s An Episode of Sparrows; Lowry’s The Giver; The UNCRC);
        c. Access to justice (Rose’s 12 Angry Men; Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird; The UDHR);
        d. Resource-rationing and the use of post-apocalyptic or dystopian ‘fictions’ (Huxley’s Brave New World; Orwell’s 1984; Collins’ The Hunger Games; Nolan and Johnson’s Logan’s Run; selection of domestic case law, Coronavirus Act provisions e.g. Care Easements).
        e. Homelessness (Smith’s Hotel World, Roth’s Divergent; Art 8 ECHR – selected case law)
        f. Disenfranchisement – social [in]security (Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath; Dickens’ A Christmas Carol; A1P1 ECHR; selected domestic case law)


        Aspects of such works will be evaluated against law and policy frameworks (e.g. UN Jurisprudence (Country Reports, Concluding Observations, Strasbourg case law, domestic legislation) to gauge the significance – or otherwise – of law reform/rights discourses in times of conflict, austerity, or social upheaval. Comparison with other jurisdictions will be made, where appropriate. There is also scope for guest speakers (from the charitable sector, NGOs etc e.g. CPAG, Kinship Care NI, NSPCC, Women’s Aid, Asylum Link). Students will also be encouraged to suggest works for analysis/debate.

        Learning Outcomes

        By the end of this module students should be able to:

        • Understand the nature, role and remit of law in bringing about meaningful reforms and preventing/addressing social injustice[s]
        • Identify processes for law reform and critique their effectiveness
        • Define – and critique – the concepts of social justice, vulnerability, harm, and human rights
        • Understand the various mechanisms (domestic and international) associated with the realisation, enforcement and monitoring of human rights
        • Understand the role and remit of the lawyer as ‘social activist’
        • Understand the notion of vulnerability and the various legal (and socio-cultural) methods for highlighting /addressing it
        • Understand the key rights and values associated with social justice and the key SDG principles associated with e.g. alleviating poverty
        • Understand the role of voluntary agencies/NGOs
        • Critically examine how legal processes and domestic laws may be inadequate in relation to addressing chronic issues of systemic injustice (e.g. property law, social security, child protection)

        Skills

        Post-lecture seminars will focus on discussion of the set texts (excerpts) to highlight /analyse the socio-legal issues, identify and evaluate the arguments of the authors and relate them to current legal frameworks.
        This activity will develop the following skills:

        Strategic: Ability to identify and evaluate key concepts and present logical arguments and consider/address opposing viewpoints

        Research: Ability to engage in close reading of documents and texts, and to source, summarise and present relevant academic material using legal and humanities-relevant databases e.g. heinonline, JStor

        Analysis: Ability to critique theories of social justice and to evaluate the success or otherwise of reform measures and institutions

        Conceptual: Ability to synthesize conflicting theories and opinions across a range of human rights issues

        Communication: Ability to identify themes, and to then present and validate arguments [verbal and written] grounded in independent research and cogent analysis

        Assessment

        100 % course work 4000-word essay

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Media Law
        Overview

        The module will introduce students to media law in Northern Ireland, and is aimed at students who may be interested in the practice of media law, or who may wish to work in media or public relations. Other jurisdictions (including England, the Republic of Ireland, Europe, US, Australia, and Canada) will be referenced throughout in comparison, as to develop students’ critical appraisal of the law.

        The module will explore how the media’s distribution of information is regulated by the legal regimes of Data Protection, Copyright law, and Freedom of Information. It will also examine the legal framework of Contempt of Court and the obligations of the press in that respect, and the protection of journalistic sources under the law.

        The module will look in depth at the subject of Defamation Law and will instruct students in relation to the legal regime that applies at the time (the Northern Ireland Assembly is currently debating whether to reform this area of law). The module will go into more detail than the brief overview of the subject that is provided students in the undergraduate Torts module. It will examine substantive contemporary issues, such as defamatory meaning, costs in defamation litigation, the defence of truth, privileged communication, the regulation of public interest speech, and liability for online defamation. It will also cover the basic process of a libel action, the particulars of claim, interlocutory matters, the defence, and trial.

        The module will also explore the protection of privacy in law, and good practice of the media in relation to the right to privacy. Again, this would involve covering the subject in greater depth than it is afforded in the undergraduate Torts module. The module will include examination of the Article 8 right to private life, the action of Misuse of Private Information, the various issues and topics that are likely to engage a reasonable expectation of privacy, and the proper conduct of reporting or media relations in respect of privacy. The course will also examine the conditions under which intrusions into private life may be justified in the public interest.

        The module will also examine relevant voluntary press codes, the role of apologies, retractions and corrections, and the extensive body of ‘soft-law’ here which has become increasingly important in the application and development of the law in this area.

        Finally, the module also aims to include two guest speakers; one a high-profile media lawyer who can talk to students about the thriving practice of this area of law in Northern Ireland; the other a print media journalist who can inform students about professional experience with the legal framework in Northern Ireland.

        Learning Outcomes

        By the end of this module students should be able to:

        • Understand the media landscape in Northern Ireland, the role of online publication, and the control of parent companies located in other parts of the UK and Ireland.
        • Understand the key sources of media law and the main legal principles relevant to the production of multimedia journalism.
        • Understand the key rights and values that frame this area of law.
        • Understand the legal regimes of Data Protection, Copyright law, and Freedom of Information as they relate to professional media services.
        • Understand how media law in Northern Ireland regulates the right to fair trial, the role of Contempt of Court in relation to the press, and the protection available for journalistic sources.
        • Understand the role of voluntary press codes in informing the law.
        • Critically examine how media law in Northern Ireland regulates protection of the rights to reputation and privacy. Understand the course of proceedings in both actions, and the potential relationship between Defamation and Misuse of Private Information in litigation.
        • Critically understand how media law protects the right to free speech and the rights and responsibility of the media in relation to the public interest.

        Skills

        After the introductory seminars, the module will be organised in three blocks of problem-focused seminars, where students will learn through group-based problem exercises. These will be designed to foster and develop the following skills:

        Strategic: Ability to sift and sort a range of information to consider and identify alternative solutions to set problems.

        Research: Ability to find, collect, organise and employ information relevant to learning.

        Analytical: Ability to question and challenge theories and institutionalised rules of media law, in order to develop learning and insight into the subject.

        Conceptual: Ability to draw different aspects of the subject together to provide best explanations and generate insight into the subject.

        Communication: Ability to speak and write clearly about what is learnt or gleaned in the subject for the attention and learning of others.

        Assessment

        None

        Coursework

        40%

        Written

        60%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Careers and Placement Module
        Overview

        This new module, which is made available on a competitive basis to students, involves spending a minimum of 100 hours in an appropriate placement with a relevant organisation in Northern Ireland or elsewhere. This will include a wide variety of organisations (public, private, community, voluntary). This module will take place during the final year of study (level 3). Students are expected to have sourced their placements by 10 June. The placement in question may also take place in the summer months before the commencement of a student’s level 3 academic year.

        The onus will be on the students to obtain a placement. The student will have to seek prior approval for this placement from the module co-ordinator. Their request will be subject to an auditing process which will determine the suitability of the placement. Students will be provided with support from the Law School’s Placement Officer/Employability and Skills Coordinator. There will be a placement approval process based on the learning objectives. Only placements that have been approved will qualify for participation in this module. The placement can be paid or unpaid. The approval form which confirms that the placement meets the learning objectives. The placement module will provide a supportive structure to students as they undertake placements. It is worth noting that many of the mechanisms are already in place in terms of student support and guidance. This new module will be open to every student in the Law school, including international students. It does not single out any particular cohort or provide or place certain students at a disadvantage.

        The student will have contact with an academic contact, who will discuss the case study and the reflective log with the student in an initial one-on-one meeting.

        Note that in terms of the administration of the module, there will need to be allocation in the WAM for the individual assessments (e.g. 1 hour per student). The module will be led by the Employability and Skills Coordinator, who will act as module leader. The academic contacts will also receive credit in the WAM for supervising the case studies.

        There will be an appropriate page on Canvas which will set out the relevant deadlines. The Canvas page will allow students to upload different assignments. This module will have its own module on canvass separate to AHS7004 and placement students will have access to all relevant resources. All necessary paperwork will be uploaded and stored here for monitoring purposes.

        Learning Outcomes

        On successful completion of this module, students will have developed their professional knowledge and workplace capacity; acquired a clear understanding of the work, organisation and operation of the host institution; produced work that is both academically sound and of practical utility for the Law School; and developed and acquired a range of skills, including working within a team setting and complying with the norms and ethical standards of a professional working environment. Students will also have learned to combine their applied experience with academic interests and concerns.

        They will have become more aware of their career aspirations and how to achieve them; develop knowledge of undergraduate and graduate opportunities both locally and internationally; understand the skills required to compete effectively for placement and graduate jobs in the future; report on the various labour market information related to their degree pathway; and develop practical experience of presentation skills, team work activities and research and analytical skills.

        Skills

        Participation in the placement and completion of the assessment will allow students to develop the following skills:

        Intellectual skills
        • Managing & Prioritizing Knowledge: identify relevant and project-specific knowledge, sources and data; manage such information in an independent manner

        • Analytical Thinking: identify, understand, interpret and evaluate relevant subject-specific arguments made by others; construct independent arguments

        • Critical & Independent Thinking: ability to think critically and construct one’s own position in relation to existing tasks and ongoing debates in the field

        Professional and career development skills
        • Communication Skills: ability to communicate clearly with others, both orally and in writing, and to write for different audiences – academic and practitioner

        • Teamwork: ability to work with others in a team, negotiate conflicts and recognize different ways of learning

        • Diversity: ability to acknowledge and be sensitive to the range of cultural differences present in the working environment

        • Self-Reflexivity: ability to reflect on one’s own progress and identify and act upon one’s own development needs with respect to life-long learning and career development

        • Time Management: ability to negotiate diverse and competing workplace pressures; cope with stress; and achieve a work / life balance

        Technical and practical skills
        • Information Technology: demonstrate the knowledge and ability to use contemporary and relevant ICT, and to learn new IT skills

        • Regulations and standards: students will be made aware of the current rules and regulations concerning information management and security in the workplace

        Organizational skills
        • Efficient and effective work practice: demonstrate ability to work efficiently to deadlines, both individually and as part of a team
        • Clear organisation of information: show efficiency in the organisation of large amounts of complex information and the ability to identify, describe and analyse the key features of the information
        • Organisation and communication: demonstrate ability to use evidence to develop logical and clear arguments; show aptitude for the effective use of information in a direct and appropriate way
        • Enterprising thinking: Demonstrate ability to think and argue in novel and enterprising ways, to display originality of thought and argument and the ability to clearly support arguments in innovative ways

        Assessment

        The students must spend at least 100 hours in the placement.

        There will be a two-hour advance preparation workshop early June, (face-2-face or online), which students who are undertaking module are mandated to attend. Students will be able to access Canvas in August. This is linked to QSUS enrolment.

        During and following completion of the placement, the student will work on a reflective journal and a case study.

        There will be structured classes during year 3, with elements such as reflective writing (delivered by Learning Development Services), presentation skills, communication in the workplace, industry-led workshops (timetabled). nb: students who have chosen the Placement Module would be mandated to attend; other 3rd year students would have the option to attend.

        In summary, the student must:

        (1) Submit pre-placement paperwork prior to starting, which will include a placement proposal (an A4 page outlining how the placement relates to academic study, career plans and skills development).

        (2) Carry out the minimum 100 hours flexible placement.

        (3) Attend the relevant sessions (advance workshop in June and the L3 scheduled classes).

        (4) Undertake the relevant assessment, to include a reflective journal, case study and presentation.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3145

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • The Law and the Dead
        Overview

        Death is universal, and creates distinct series of legal issues- affecting both the deceased and those who are left behind- from the moment of someone’s passing. This module explores selected issues, around the fate of the recently dead and the assets that they leave behind. It fuses the doctrinal with the theoretical, and draws on a range of other disciplines beyond law.

        Part 1 of the module looks at the fate of the recently dead, focusing on three distinct topics: (i) post-mortems, and the law’s adaptation to new methods of technology and religious/cultural sensitivities towards invasive procedures; (ii) the legal resolution of family disputes over funerals; and (iii) the legal challenges posed by new methods of bodily disposal (e.g. natural burial, water cremation and human composting) that are being driven by demand for greater choice and environmental concerns.

        Part 2 of the module looks at core elements of succession law. Beginning with theories of inheritance, it focuses on will-making and the attempts to move beyond rigid compliance with legal formalities in the internet age and drawing also on the recent experience of the pandemic (when will-making increased significantly and access to legal services was more difficult). This is followed by intestacy laws (rules for estate distribution where someone dies without a (valid) will) and whether these laws replicate modern notions of kinship and family. The module then moves to family provision, which allows specific relatives and dependants to challenge the fact that they did not receive anything/enough from the deceased’s estate, and focuses on high-profile, contentious legal disputes between two categories of applicant: surviving spouses and independent adult children. The family provision system (unique to the common law) is contrasted with civil law inheritance systems with their fixed shares spouses and dependants. Finally, the module looks at the legal and social policy issues ‘of dead hand control’, where will-makers try to control their beneficiaries’ behaviours and lifestyle choices from beyond the grave by leaving gifts with forfeiting conditions attached.

        Learning Outcomes

        Students will acquire a deep knowledge and understanding of selected laws around the fate of the dead and core inheritance issues; a critical awareness of how these laws operate, and of the broader legal and policy objectives underpinning them; and the intersection of these laws with other disciplines (e.g. death studies, economics). Students will also be able to critically analyse these laws, and to construct independent arguments about their current status and future development in looking at contemporary debates at the forefront of the field.

        Skills

        As part of enhancing and developing core skills, students will acquire the ability to:
        • identify, understand, interpret and evaluate existing laws and important contemporary societal concerns in selected aspects of the law and the dead;
        • evaluate materials from other disciplines, to develop a broader understanding and contextual awareness of the core issues arising here;
        • critically construct their own positions and develop independent arguments through a mix of scholarly reading, group discussion and independent research;
        • convey these arguments and positions clearly and succinctly, in both oral and written form, to specialist audiences; and
        • undertake independent research, and formulate appropriate research questions, as part of the assessment process.

        Assessment

        Successful completion of module assessments (coursework format).

        The module will be assessed by a single coursework essay designed to give students an opportunity to undertake an in-depth piece of legal research. Students will be able to choose their essay from the list provided by the module convenor, or write an essay on a topic of their choice (and linked to topics covered in the module) subject to the consent of both the internal and external examiners.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3146

        Teaching period

        Semester 2

        Duration

        12 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

      • Family Law
        Overview

        This module will provide an insight into family law, regarding the range of relationships involved and the consequences of the breakdown or cessation of these relationships.

        Depending on staff availability and topicality, it will consider aspects such as the varying nature of family relationships and legal recognition of these, domestic violence, child protection and access, ancillary relief and rights in the case of unmarried/unregistered cohabitants.

        Learning Outcomes

        Upon completion, students should acquire detailed knowledge and understanding in relation to the significance of family law and its impact upon individuals' private lives. Specifically:
        - knowledge of the legal framework which regulates the rights and obligations between family members;
        - knowledge of legal aspects regarding the creation of family relationships, including the varying nature of personal relationships and State recognition of these;
        - knowledge of legal aspects regarding the consequences of the break-up of family relationships, including protection issues, rights and responsibilities where children are involved and interests in the home;
        - awareness and understanding of societal trends and conflicts in the area, which impact upon legal policy;
        - knowledge of specific legal aspects regarding the creation and break-up of family relationships; and
        - a range of skills noted below.

        Skills

        Upon completion of this module, students should be able to:
        - evaluate and critically analyse the interaction of the State with private lives;
        - evaluate and critically analyse the societal trends, legal developments and their interplay;
        - identify the main issues and challenges in the area and relating to specific factual scenarios;
        - develop independent opinions and engage in academic debate;
        - develop potential options for reform based on a critical examination of the status quo; and
        - provide considered advice in relation to factual scenarios based on the relevant law and nature of personal relationships.

        Assessment

        Assessment which reflects the learning outcomes and required skills.

        Coursework

        100%

        Written

        0%

        Practical

        0%

        Stage/Level

        3

        Credits

        20

        Module Code

        LAW3147

        Teaching period

        Semester 1

        Duration

        24 weeks

        Pre-requisite

        No

        Core/Optional

        Optional

  • Entry Requirements

    Entrance requirements

    A level requirements
    AAA including A-level French grade A

    A maximum of one BTEC/OCR Single Award or AQA Extended Certificate will be accepted as part of an applicant's portfolio of qualifications with a Distinction* being equated to a grade A at A-level.
    Irish leaving certificate requirements
    H2H2H3H3H3H3 including Higher Level grade H2 in French
    International Baccalaureate Diploma
    36 points overall, including 6 (French),6,6 at Higher Level. If not offered at Higher Level/GCSE then Standard Level grade 4 in English would be accepted.
    Graduate
    A minimum of a 2:1 Honours Degree, provided subject requirements have been met.

    Selection Criteria

    In addition, to the entrance requirements above, it is essential that you read our guidance below on 'How we choose our students' prior to submitting your UCAS application.

    In addition to the entrance requirements above, it is essential that you read our guidance below on 'How we choose our students' prior to submitting your UCAS application.

    Applications are dealt with centrally by the Admissions and Access Service rather than by individual University Schools. Once your on-line form has been processed by UCAS and forwarded to Queen's, an acknowledgement is normally sent within two weeks of its receipt at the University.

    Selection is on the basis of the information provided on your UCAS form. Decisions are made on an ongoing basis and will be notified to you via UCAS. These decisions can only be made on the basis of the information given and applicants must show due care and diligence when completing their applications. In particular, full details must be included about qualifications completed or still to be completed.

    Demand for places differs from course to course and, for Law with French, past performance at GCSE is taken into account when deciding whether or not to make conditional offers. For entry last year, we initially made offers to applicants offering A-Level/BTEC Level 3 qualifications, who had achieved 2 grade A/7 and 4 grade B/6 at GCSE. The Selector also checks that any specific entry requirements in terms of GCSE and/or A-level subjects can be fulfilled. This threshold may be lowered as the cycle progresses depending upon the number and quality of applications. The final threshold is not usually determined until late in the admissions cycle, so there may be a delay in processing applicants who do not meet the initial threshold. GCSE English Language grade C is also required.

    For applicants offering Irish Leaving Certificate, please note that performance at Junior Certificate is taken into account. Last year the initial Junior Certificate profile to qualify to be made an offer was 2A/2 Distinctions and 4B/4 Higher Merit grades. The Selector also checks that any specific entry requirements in terms of Leaving Certificate subjects can be satisfied. This threshold may be lowered as the cycle progresses depending upon the number and quality of applications. The final threshold is not usually determined until late in the admissions cycle, so there may be a delay in processing applicants who do not meet the initial threshold.

    Offers are normally made on the basis of 3 A-levels. The offer for repeat applicants is set in terms of 3 A-Levels only and is normally the same as that asked from the first time applicants. Grades may be held from the previous year.

    Applicants offering two A-levels and one BTEC Subsidiary Diploma/National Extended Certificate (or equivalent qualification), or one A-level and a BTEC Diploma/National Diploma (or equivalent qualification) will also be considered. Offers will be made in terms of the overall BTEC grade(s) awarded. Please note that a maximum of one BTEC Subsidiary Diploma/National Extended Certificate (or equivalent) will be counted as part of an applicant’s portfolio of qualifications. Subject specific requirements must also be satisfied. The normal GCSE profile will be expected.

    Access courses, BTEC Extended/National Extended Diplomas, Higher National Certificates, and Higher National Diplomas can be considered, provided the French language subject requirement is also fulfilled.

    A-level General Studies and A-level Critical Thinking would not normally be considered as part of a three A-level offer and, although they may be excluded where an applicant is taking 4 A-level subjects, the grade achieved could be taken into account if necessary in August.

    The information provided in the personal statement section and the academic reference together with predicted grades are noted however, these are not the final deciding factors as to whether or not a conditional offer can be made. However, they may be reconsidered in a tie break situation in August.

    Applicants are not normally asked to attend for interview, though there are some exceptions and specific information is provided with the relevant subject areas.

    If you are made an offer then you may be invited to a Faculty/School Open Day, which is usually held in the second semester. This will allow you the opportunity to visit the University and to find out more about the degree programme of your choice and the facilities on offer. It also gives you a flavour of the academic and social life at Queen's.

    If you cannot find the information you need here, please contact the University Admissions Service (admissions@qub.ac.uk), giving full details of your qualifications and educational background.

    International Students

    Our country/region pages include information on entry requirements, tuition fees, scholarships, student profiles, upcoming events and contacts for your country/region. Use the dropdown list below for specific information for your country/region.

    English Language Requirements

    An IELTS score of 6.5 with a minimum of 5.5 in each test component or an equivalent acceptable qualification, details of which are available at: http://go.qub.ac.uk/EnglishLanguageReqs

    If you need to improve your English language skills before you enter this degree programme, INTO Queen's University Belfast offers a range of English language courses. These intensive and flexible courses are designed to improve your English ability for admission to this degree.

    • Academic English: an intensive English language and study skills course for successful university study at degree level
    • Pre-sessional English: a short intensive academic English course for students starting a degree programme at Queen's University Belfast and who need to improve their English.

    International Students - Foundation and International Year One Programmes

    INTO Queen's offers a range of academic and English language programmes to help prepare international students for undergraduate study at Queen's University. You will learn from experienced teachers in a dedicated international study centre on campus, and will have full access to the University's world-class facilities.

    These programmes are designed for international students who do not meet the required academic and English language requirements for direct entry.

    INTO - English Language Course(QSIS ELEMENT IS EMPTY)

    NEXT
    Careers

  • Careers

    Career Prospects

    Introduction
    Studying Law with French at Queen’s will assist students in developing the core skills and employment-related experiences that are valued by employers, professional organisations and academic institutions. Graduates from this degree at Queen’s are well regarded by many employers (local, national and international) and over half of all graduate jobs are now open to graduates of any discipline, including Law.
    http://www.prospects.ac.uk

    Employment after the Course
    The following is a list of the major career sectors that have attracted our graduates in recent years:
    • Management Consultancy
    • Corporate Banking
    • Purchasing Officer
    • Fast Stream Civil Service
    • Publishing, Media and Performing Arts
    • Export Marketing
    • Advertising
    • Finance
    • Law Enforcement and Public Prosecution
    • Varied graduate programmes (Times Top 100 UK Graduate Recruiters/ AGR Association of Graduate Recruiters UK)

    Employment Links
    Placement Employers
    Our past students have also gained work placements with organisations such as:
    The Council of the EU
    The European Commission
    The European Parliament
    The United Nations (UN)
    The Council of Europe
    Thomson Reuters
    The Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)

    Graduate Employers include: A& L Goodbody, Allen & Overy, Baker and McKenzie, CitiGroup, Deloitte, EY, First Derivatives, PWC, Wilson Nesbitt, Herbert Smith Freehills.

    What employers say

    “Baker McKenzie selected Belfast as a location in large part because of the quality of the education system in Northern Ireland and the tremendous talent from Universities right on our doorstep. We recruit extensively at graduate level and have been delighted with the quality of graduates from Queen’s. We have developed a strong relationship with the School of Law and look to continue to work with Queen’s ahead as our business continues to grow.”
    Sarah Fowler, Baker McKenzie

    Additional Awards Gained(QSIS ELEMENT IS EMPTY)

    Prizes and Awards

    A wide range of prizes and scholarships are awarded to top performing students. A number of these are sponsored by leading law firms and organisations.

    Degree plus award for extra-curricular skills

    In addition to your degree programme, at Queen's you can have the opportunity to gain wider life, academic and employability skills. For example, placements, voluntary work, clubs, societies, sports and lots more. So not only do you graduate with a degree recognised from a world leading university, you'll have practical national and international experience plus a wider exposure to life overall. We call this Degree Plus. It's what makes studying at Queen's University Belfast special.

  • Fees and Funding

    Tuition Fees

    Northern Ireland (NI) 1 £4,630
    Republic of Ireland (ROI) 2 £4,630
    England, Scotland or Wales (GB) 1 £9,250
    EU Other 3 £18,800
    International £18,800

    1 EU citizens in the EU Settlement Scheme, with settled status, will be charged the NI or GB tuition fee based on where they are ordinarily resident. Students who are ROI nationals resident in GB will be charged the GB fee.

    2 EU students who are ROI nationals resident in ROI are eligible for NI tuition fees.

    3 EU Other students (excludes Republic of Ireland nationals living in GB, NI or ROI) are charged tuition fees in line with international fees.

    All tuition fees quoted relate to a single year of study unless stated otherwise. The NI and ROI fees relate to academic year 2022-23 and will be updated to 2023-24 rates once they have been confirmed. All fees will be subject to an annual inflationary increase, unless explicitly stated otherwise.

    NI, GB and ROI fees for 2022 entry will be published soon. International fees for 2022 entry can be viewed here: www.qub.ac.uk/International/International-students/International-tuition-fees

    Tuition fee rates are calculated based on a student’s tuition fee status and generally increase annually by inflation. How tuition fees are determined is set out in the Student Finance Framework.

    Additional course costs

    All Students

    Depending on the programme of study, there may be extra costs which are not covered by tuition fees, which students will need to consider when planning their studies.

    Students can borrow books and access online learning resources from any Queen's library.

    If students wish to purchase recommended texts, rather than borrow them from the University Library, prices per text can range from £30 to £100. A programme may have up to 6 modules per year, each with a recommended text.  

    Students should also budget between £30 to £75 per year for photocopying, memory sticks and printing charges.  

    Students undertaking a period of work placement or study abroad, as either a compulsory or optional part of their programme, should be aware that they will have to fund additional travel and living costs.

    If a final year includes a major project or dissertation, there may be costs associated with transport, accommodation and/or materials. The amount will depend on the project chosen. There may also be additional costs for printing and binding.

    Students may wish to consider purchasing an electronic device; costs will vary depending on the specification of the model chosen.

    There are also additional charges for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines.

    Law (Major) with French costs

    Students undertaking the Law with French programme spend year 3 at a French speaking university, this year abroad is a compulsory part of the degree programme.

    Students who undertake a period of study or work abroad, are responsible for funding travel, accommodation and subsistence costs. These costs vary depending on the location and duration of the placement.

    Students should be aware that placement and internship modules do not normally involve payment or financial support from either Queen’s or the placement/internship provider.

    A limited amount of funding may be available to contribute towards these additional costs, if the placement takes place through a government student mobility scheme.

    How do I fund my study?

    There are different tuition fee and student financial support arrangements for students from Northern Ireland, those from England, Scotland and Wales (Great Britain), and those from the rest of the European Union.

    Information on funding options and financial assistance for undergraduate students is available at www.qub.ac.uk/Study/Undergraduate/Fees-and-scholarships/.

    Scholarships

    Each year, we offer a range of scholarships and prizes for new students. Information on scholarships available.

    International Scholarships

    Information on scholarships for international students, is available at www.qub.ac.uk/International/International-students/International-scholarships/.

    PREV
    Careers

    NEXT
    Apply

  • Apply

    How and when to Apply

    1. How to Apply
    Application for admission to full-time undergraduate and sandwich courses at the University should normally be made through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS). Full information can be obtained from the UCAS website at:

    2. When to Apply
    UCAS will start processing applications for entry in autumn 2021 from 1 September 2020.

    Advisory closing date: 15 January 2021(18:00).

    Applications received after this date will not be considered.

    Applicants are encouraged to apply as early as is consistent with having made a careful and considered choice of institutions and courses.

    The Institution code for Queen’s is QBELF and the institution code is Q75.

    Further information on applying to study at Queen's is available at:
    www.qub.ac.uk/Study/Undergraduate/How-to-apply/

    3. Terms and Conditions
    After an offer is made this will be notified to applicants through UCAS. Confirmation will be emailed by the Admissions and Access Service and this communication will also include Terms and Conditions which applicants should read carefully in advance of replying to their offer(s) on UCAS Track.

    4. International (Non- EU) Students
    ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR INTERNATIONAL (NON-EU) STUDENTS
    Applying through agents and partners
    The University’s in-country representatives can assist you to submit a UCAS application. Please consult the Agent List to find an agent in your country who will help you with your application to Queen’s University.

    4.1 Applying through UCAS
    Most students make their applications through UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service) for full-time undergraduate degree programmes at Queen's.
    www.ucas.com/

    4.2 Applying direct
    The Direct Entry Application form is to be used by international applicants who wish to apply directly, and only, to Queen's or who have been asked to provide information in advance of submitting a formal UCAS application.
    www.qub.ac.uk/International/International-students/Applying/

    4.3 Applying through agents and partners
    The University’s in-country representatives can assist you to submit a UCAS application or a direct application. Please consult the Agent List to find an agent in your country who will help you with your application to Queen’s University.
    www.qub.ac.uk/International/International-students/Applying/Agents-and-partner-information

    Download a prospectus

    Keywords

    LAW

    LAW AND FRENCH

    LAW WITH FRENCH

    LLB LAW AND FRENCH

    LLB LAW WITH FRENCH

Register your interest
Course Vacancy Status

Below is the current vacancy status for this course. For further information please contact us.

Student Type
Places available?
NI and RoI Students
GB Students
International and EU (not RoI) Students