Irish Studies Gateway

Stafflist

Director

Prof. Peter Gray

6-8 Fitzwilliam St, Belfast, BT7 1NN

Email p.h.gray@qub.ac.uk or irish.studies@qub.ac.uk

Tel. +44 28 9097 3433 / 5226

Administrator

Ms Cathy Devlin

26 University Square, Belfast, BT7 1NN

email c.devlin@qub.ac.uk or irish.studies@qub.ac.uk

Tel. +44 28 9097 3700

(Tues-Thurs)

Anthropology

School of History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics (HAPP) / Mitchell Institute

DR DOMINIC BRYAN

Reader in Anthropology (HAPP) / Member of IS Steering Group

Research: Political anthropology; public ritual; public order and policing in Northern Ireland; symbolism; ethnicity; nationalism and group identity; anthropology and public policy; Irish history; Orangeism, use of history and invention of tradition; the mass media; social theory.

DR NEIL JARMAN

Research Fellow in Conflict Studies (Mitchell Institute)

Research: Peacebuilding and conflict transformation work in Northern Ireland, work on Orange Order parades, murals and other visual displays; segregation and sectarianism; interface; racism and minority ethnic communities. 

Archaeology

School of Natural and Built Environment

DR LAURA BASALL

Lecturer in Archaeology (SNBE)

Research: I am a prehistoric archaeologist fascinated by the evolution and spread of Homo sapiens and how they interacted with other hominins. Since moving to Belfast in 2013 I’ve started to explore the earliest colonisation of Ireland during the Mesolithic. My interests are particularly in the integration of landscape based approaches and geochronology with behavioural analyses, and the technological analysis of stone tools.  
DR DIRK BRANDHERM Lecturer in Archaeology (SNBE)

Research: I am interested in the development of Bronze and Iron Age societies in Ireland and other parts of Western Europe. The focus of much of my current work is on material culture, prehistoric group identities and economies.

  MR DAVID BROWN

Research Fellow in Archaeology (SNBE)

Research: I undertake the dendrochronological analysis of wood samples from Irish peat bogs, rivers and lakes, archaeological sites and standing buildings. I provide written reports and advice to archaeologists, building historians, environmentalists and others working in Ireland.

  DR COLM DONNELLY

Director, Centre for Archaeological Fieldwork (SNBE)


Research: the archaeology, history and architecture of Medieval Ireland (with particular interest in the Gaelic lordships of Ulster) and the Ulster Plantation; the archaeological investigation of the Irish diaspora in the USA, with particular reference to Lowell, Massachusetts; Irish vernacular buildings, farming practices, rural industries, and folk traditions (c.1700 to c.1950); children’s burial grounds (cillíní) in Ireland; the archaeological study of Irish soldiering during the First World War.

  DR FINBAR MCCORMICK

Senior Lecturer in Archaeology (SNBE) / Member of IS Steering Group

Research: My current research projects are concerned with Early medieval settlement and economy in Ireland particularly with the EMAP project in association with Prof Aidan O'Sullivan of University College Dublin

DR WILLIAM MEGARRY

Lecturer in Geographical Information Science (SNBE)

Research: My primary area of work in Ireland has focused on geospatial technologies applied to Irish Heritage sites and landscapes in both research and commercial capacities. These include remote sensing survey and analysis, and historic landscape characterisation at the Bru na Boinne World Heritage Site, Co. Meath
DR EILEEN MURPHY

Senior Lecturer in Archaeology and Palaeoecology (SNBE)

Research: My main areas of expertise lie in human osteoarchaeology and palaeopathology and I am interested in the health of the past populations of Ireland from all time periods. My research also focuses on Irish burial practices, and in particular on cillíní, unconsecrated burial grounds reserved largely for the burial of unbaptised infants. I am a member of the Irish-American Heritage Archaeological Project and my role has involved a study of the grave memorials of the first Irish settlers in Lowell, Massachusetts. I am the editor of the journal Childhood in the Past, and my work on past childhood within an Irish context has included projects on grave memorials and schools.

  DR GILL PLUNKETT

Senior Lecturer in Archaeology & Palaeoecology (SNBE)

Research: I am interested in Irish archaeology (particularly the later prehistoric period) and the relationship between past cultures and their environment. Much of my work focuses on Irish bogs, and the very rich archive of archaeological sites and palaeoenvironmental data that they contain.

Creative Arts

Drama, Film Studies and Music

School of Arts, English and Languanges (AEL)

DR VICTORIA DURRER

Lecturer in Arts Management and Cultural Policy (AEL)

Research: Victoria is co-founder of the Cultural Policy Observatory Ireland, an all island research network and serves on the editorial panel of the Irish Journal of Arts Management and Cultural Policy. Her research focuses on the relationship between cultural institutions and the social realm. She is particularly interested in unpicking how the field of cultural production—its policies, organisations and specific artistic practices—is both structured and restructured through what are often understood as competing artistic, economic, institutional and social agendas. She is currently establishing work on the role of local government in cultural policy in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. She received an Improving Children's Lives Award from QUB to examine young people's interpretations and experiences of cultural participation in Ireland with colleagues in the School of Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work.

  DR AOIFE McGRATH

Lecturer in Drama (AEL)

Research: My core research interests are dance and politics in Ireland, community/collaborative dance in Ireland, performance and philosophy, and cultural and affect studies. Current projects include work on abortion rights in Ireland, female choreographers in Ireland, dance and parenthood/the maternal, and dance and affect. I am a performer/choreographer member of Dance Ireland, a board member of Dance Limerick and a board member of the Irish Society for Theatre Research.
PROF CAHAL McLAUGHLIN Professor of Film Studies (AEL) / Member of IS Steering Group

Director of the Prisons Memory Archive, a filmed collection of walk-and-talk interviews with those who passed through the Troubles prisons. Generally, the representation of memories in societies emerging from political violence. Also, some interest in Troubles themed cinema.

DR TRÍONA O’HANLON

Marie Skłodowska-Curie Research Fellow in Music (AEL)

Research: Thomas Moore in a European context: Moore's Irish Melodies and National Airs, Lalla Rookh

DR DES O’RAWE

Lecturer in Film Studies (AEL)

Research: My graduate research was in Irish Studies, and some of my subsequent work has been in the area of Irish film and visual culture.

 
DR MARK PHELAN

Lecturer in Drama (AEL)

Research: My research is primarily concerned with the role theatre and performance 'plays' in ongoing processes of conflict transformation in the North of Ireland, where various artists and activists have used theatre as a public forum for civic debate and to deal with issues of truth, remembrance, reconciliation, trauma, transitional justice, forgiveness and forgetting.

Economics

Queen's Management School (QMS)

DR GRAHAM BROWNLOW

Lecturer in Economics (QMS) / Member of IS Steering Group

Research: Graham is an economist specialising in long-run Irish economic and business history. He is co-editor of Irish Economic and Social History. His research covers the period from the 18th century to the present day. He has published on both contemporary and historical topics as varied as tax devolution in the current NI Assembly, New Zealand’s economy in an Irish ‘mirror’, the causes and consequences of Irish rent-seeking, the history of economic thought in Ireland, the role of globalisation in economic debates around Home Rule, the rise and fall of John De Lorean, the economics of violence and counter-terrorism in Northern Ireland, the rise and fall of the Celtic Tiger and Irish linen and demythologising the intellectual contributions of George O’Brien, T.K. Whitaker and Raymond Crotty.

DR CHRIS COLVIN

Lecturer in Economics (QMS)

Research: I am an economic and business historian with research interests in banking crises, corporate governance, cultural economics, and quantitative social history. I have published on the origins of cooperative banking in Ireland in the early twentieth century. I am currently working towards building a new quantitative social history of Ireland in the nineteenth century using prison registers and other institutional records.

DR ALAN FERNIHOUGH

Lecturer in  Economics (QMS)

Research: I am interested in Irish economic history. In particular, I have an interest in demography and the relationship between population and economic growth. Currently, I am involved in projects looking at the link between fertility and economic conditions prior to the famine, the impact of famine related migration on the British labour market and economy, and the rise of Sinn Féin in the 1918 election. My previous research includes projects on mixed marriages and schooling in Ireland

Education

School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work (SSESW)

MS LESLEY EMERSON

Lecturer in Education; Deputy Director, Centre for Children’s Rights (SSESW)

Research: My research interests fall into these interrelated themes, with a focus on the context of Northern Ireland:

  • Citizenship/political education in divided societies, with a focus on education in the context of the transition from conflict to peace;
  • The role of former combatants in education for citizenship;
  • The relationship between history and citizenship education in addressing the legacy of the past.
PROF TONY GALLAGHER

Professor of Education (SSESW)

Research: My main research interest lies in the role of education in divided societies and much of this work has focused on schools in Northern Ireland. For the past 15 years or so I have carried out work on shared education involving the establishment of collaborative networks of Protestant, Catholic and Integrated schools to use network effects to promote reconciliation, school improvement and the more effective use of resources. I have also carried out extensive work on patterns of participation and access to education, and the impact of education policy on equality. More generally I am interested in the history of education in Ireland.

 
PROF JOANNE HUGHES

UNESCO Professor of Education; Director of the Centre for Shared Education (SSESW)

Research: The role of education in divided societies, including Northern Ireland.

DR LYNNE McKERR

Research Assistant in Education (SSESW)

Research: Archaeology of the Irish National Schools; childhood in Ireland from c.1600-1948.
DR CATHAL McMANUS Lecturer in Education (SSESW)

Research: My research interests centre on conflict and conflict transformation. I am particularly interested in the factors that help to generate conflict and the role that adult education can play in addressing such issues. My current research explores how long-term processes of “Othering” helps to generate communal tensions and an exploration of how history is used, alongside contemporary grievances, to maintain social divisions. Related to this I am interested in processes of identity formation – particularly in national identities and nationalism.

English Literature and Creative Writing

School of Arts, English and Languages (AEL)

PROF FRAN BREARTON

Professor of English (AEL)

Research: My research focus is on modern Irish poetry, from W.B. Yeats to the present day, and on Irish literature of the First World War.

PROF CIARAN CARSON

Professor Emeritus of Creative Writing (AEL)

Research: Ciaran Carson has published some two dozen books of poetry, prose and translation, most recently From Elsewhere, translations from the work of the French poet Jean Follain, paired with poems inspired by the translations (Gallery Press 2014).  His work has won many prizes including the T. S. Eliot Award and the Forward Prize. He is a member of Aosdána, the affiliation of Irish artists, and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.

PROF MOYRA HASLETT Professor of English (AEL) / Member of IS Steering Group

Research: My research interests include culture (particularly literature and song) in eighteenth-century Ireland. I have published articles and book chapters on the writings of Jonathan Swift, on Irish song, and on fiction by Irish writers in the period 1680-1820. I am co-editor of the series ‘Early Irish Fiction’, which has so far published critical editions of seven novels by Irish authors with Four Courts Press and an accompanying special issue of the Irish University Review (2011). I acted as principal investigator on the AHRC-funded Irish Song Project, which has resulted in an electronic database of c.250 songs from the earliest beginnings to 1840 and a forthcoming collection of essays on early Irish song. I am currently the editor of the first volume of Irish Literature in Transition, 1700-1780 (Cambridge University Press, commissioned).

DR STEFANIE LEHNER Lecturer in Irish Literature (AEL)

Research: My research interests are in the crosscurrents of contemporary Irish and Scottish literature as well as ‘post’-conflict cultures, with a focus on Northern Ireland. I am specifically interested in the relationship between politics, ethics, and aesthetics and my work takes inspiration from the field of postcolonial, memory, and trauma studies. I am author of Subaltern Ethics in Contemporary Scottish and Irish Literature: Tracing Counter-Histories (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), and currently editing a collection of essays on The Promise of Peace in Northern Ireland (MUP, forthcoming).  I am currently involved in two Irish Studies related research projects under the Partnership for Conflict, Crime and Security Research (PaCCS) scheme: LGBTQ Visions of Peace in a Society Emerging from Conflict, and Sounding Conflict: From Resistance to Reconciliation.

 

DR LEON LITVACK

Reader in Victorian Studies (AEL)

Research:
  DR JIMMY McALEAVEY

Lecturer in Creative Writing (AEL)

Research: I am a playwright for stage and radio.  I often write plays about, or set in, Ireland.  Examples include Monsters, Dinosaurs, Ghosts produced in 2015 at the Abbey (published by Methuen Bloomsbury) and The Ballad of Shane O'Neill for BBC Radio 4 (about the 16th-century Ulster chief).

DR GAIL McCONNELL

Lecturer in English Literature (AEL)

Research: Dr Gail McConnell is the author of Northern Irish Poetry and Theology (Palgrave, 2014) and is one of the editors of The Irish Review. Gail’s research interests are in modern Irish and British literature, with particular interests in Northern Irish poetry and the relationships between violence, artistic practice and literary reception. She is a contributor to The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish Poetry (OUP, 2012) and has work published or forthcoming in Irish University Review and boundary 2. A member of staff within the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry at Queen’s, Gail co-ordinates the reading events programme throughout the year and has been involved in organizing conferences, most recently Seamus Heaney: A Conference and Commemoration.

DR GLENN PATTERSON

Professor of Creative Writing and Director of Seamus Heaney Centre (AEL)

Research: Glenn’s ten novels to date are: Burning Your Own (1988), a Rooney Prize and Betty Trask first novel prize-winner; Fat Lad (1992); Black Night at Big Thunder Mountain (1995), The International (1999); Number 5 (2003), That Which Was (2004), The Third Party (2007); The Mill For Grinding Old People Young, the inaugural One City One Book choice for Belfast (2012); The Rest Just Follows (2014); and Gull (2016). He has also published two essay collections, Lapsed Protestant (2006) and Here’s Me Here (2014), and the family memoir, Once upon a Hill: Love in Troubled Times (2009). Short stories and plays have been broadcast on BBC Radio 3 and Radio 4, and he has also presented television documentaries on literary and cultural subjects. His feature film Good Vibrations (co-written with Colin Carberry) was released in 2013. In 2009 he was awarded a Lannan Literary Fellowship.

  MS JULIA PAUL

Lecturer in Broadcast Literacy (AEL)

Research: My research looks at the intersections between broadcasting and democracy-building in post-conflict societies. I am interested in what happens to news coverage when there are no agreed terms of reference and no consensus. In addition, what role is there for public service broadcasting when it can no longer assume (if it ever could) that it speaks for and to the 'nation'? The coverage of news by the media in Northern Ireland was developed within this binary framework, and challenging that was what I was doing through the films I made for the BBC series Hearts and Minds. This has even more relevance now in the light of the recent political developments across the world. I want to examine further the lessons that might be learned with regards to reporting on a political process without a centre ground
DR MICHAEL PIERSE  

Lecturer in English Literature (AEL)

Research: My research has probed into new frontiers in the neglected area of class in Irish culture particularly in terms of literature. My recent and current projects focus on: crowd-sourced festival history; creativity on the margins; northern Irish working-class history and culture; Irish diaspora histories; Irish opposition to the First World War. I am working on a new monograph, Nationalism and Class in Twentieth-Century Ireland (complete 2018); have been contracted to edit (and contribute to) what promises to be a ground-breaking, 24-chapter volume, Cambridge History of Irish Working-Class Writing (now complete and submitted to CUP); and been contracted to co-edit a further collection on diaspora history and culture, Rethinking the Irish Diaspora: After the Gathering (Palgrave, 2017; and organised an associated conference, amongst many other events).

DR DANIEL S. ROBERTS Reader in English Literature (AEL)

Research: My interest in Irish studies focuses on Ireland’s relationship to British imperialism, especially in the long eighteenth century and with respect to India.

  • I was project leader for QUB for an Irish Research Council project led by Professor David Dickson of TCD on ‘Ireland, Education and Empire’.
  • I edited Charles Johnston’s novel, The History of Arsaces, Prince of Betlis (1774) for the Early Irish Fiction series.
  • I organised a conference in June 2014 titled ‘Ireland and the Colonies, 1775-1947’ for the Institute for Collaborative Research in the Humanities at QUB. 
DR SINÉAD STURGEON

Lecturer in English Literature (AEL)

Research:

My research is centred on nineteenth-century Irish writing and culture, with particular interests in the Gothic, the short story, and the life and work of the poet James Clarence Mangan.

Geography

Geography, Architecture and Planning

School of Natural and Built Environment (SNBE)

DR DIARMID FINNEGAN

Senior Lecturer in Human Geography (SNBE)

Research: My research centres on the historical geography of science and religion in the nineteenth century.  I have recently completely an AHRC-funded project on scientific culture in nineteenth-century Belfast.

DR NUALA JOHNSON

Reader in Human Geography (SNBE)

Research:

  • The conceptual and empirical dimensions of the performance of social memory with respect to public monuments, museums and heritage venues.
  • The role of place in the articulation of nationalist identities through analyses of education policy and language, literary geographies and identity, and the heritage industry’s representation of the past.
  • The historical geographies of natural history with a particular emphasis on botanical gardens, aesthetics and science, and exploration, plant-hunting and empire.
PROF KEITH LILLEY

Professor of Historical Geography (SNBE) / Member of IS Steering Group

Research: My research encompasses maps and mapping of Ireland, past and present, with current interests in the material culture of the Ordnance Survey in Ireland. Thanks to funding received from the British Academy’s International Mobility and Partnership scheme, I have developed a close collaboration between Queen’s University Belfast and University of Calcutta to explore further the Irish-India scientific, imperial and cultural connections that were forged through the linked geodetic surveys of both countries in the 19th century.

  • Collaboration with the Royal Irish Academy and the Irish Historic Towns Atlas project to create online digital atlases of Ireland’s historic towns and cities: https://www.ria.ie/digital-prototypes
DR AGUSTINA MARTIRE

Lecturer in Architecture (SNBE)

Research: StreetSpace is an interdisciplinary research project that seeks to understand the significance of mixed use urban streets, by analysing their physical, historical and experiential aspects. Streets are public spaces that connect diverse areas of the city, weaving together the urban fabric. Through the study of streets in Belfast we are looking for the significance of local mixed use streets, defining their identity and authenticity and the tangible and intangible elements that make them unique.

DR LINDA PRICE

Lecturer in Planning (SNBE)

Research:

  • Representations of the landscape in Northern Ireland within the international context of productivisit/post-productivist landscapes; links to commodification of the countryside via creative practices i.e. Games of Thrones tours of rural locations, Seamus Heaney Centre and accompanying planning/tourism/development issues drawing on views of the countryside.
  • Emotional, Affective, sensory and embodied geographies of agrarian society in NI within international trends of the demise of agrarianism; creative methodologies, literary/artistic/creative expression and interdisciplinary work i.e. Drama, History, Geography, Psychiatry exploring farming men’s connection to the ‘Farmscape’ of family, farm and community’ and the phenomena of farm suicide. 

History

School of History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics

  DR SPARKY BOOKER Lecturer in Medieval Irish History  (HAPP)

Research: I am a social, cultural, and legal historian, with a particular interest in medieval Ireland. My work on the interaction between the English and Irish living in the English colony in the later middle ages has addressed issues of ancestry and intermarriage, legal status, and the mutual exchange of language and customs between the two communities. I am particularly interested in the histories of marginalised or disenfranchised groups, like women, non-elites, and the Irish residents of the English colony. Current projects include research on the legal capabilities of women in late medieval Ireland, Irish sumptuary law in a comparative context, and the Irish in Rome in the 15th century.

DR IAN CAMPBELL Senior Lecturer in Early-Modern Irish History  (HAPP)  

Research: I write about the history of early modern Irish political thought, and the history of ideas in early modern Europe more generally. I direct the ERC research project ‘War and the Supernatural in Early Modern Europe’.

DR MARIE COLEMAN Senior Lecturer in Modern Irish History (HAPP)

 Research:

The Irish revolution, 1916-23; History and commemoration; especially First World War and 'Decade of Centenaries'; Independent Ireland; Women in modern Ireland
PROF SEAN CONNOLLY

Professor Emeritus of Irish History (HAPP)

Research:

Irish history since c.1500; Irish Catholicism; The urban history of Belfast; The Irish diaspora and the construction of a world economy

DR JOHN CUNNINGHAM Lecturer in Early-Modern Irish History (HAPP)

Research: I am an early modern historian with particular research interests in the social, political and religious history of seventeenth-century Ireland and the history of medicine in Ireland c. 1500-1750.

 
DR ELAINE FARRELL Senior Lecturer in Irish Social and Economic History (HAPP) Research: My research focuses on Irish female criminals in the nineteenth century. I am currently working on a study of the female convict prison. I am also CI on the AHRC-funded ‘Bad Bridget’ project (with Dr Leanne McCormick, Ulster University), which examines criminal and deviant Irish women in New York, Boston and Toronto, 1838-1918
PROF MARIE-THERESE FLANAGAN Professor Emerita of Medieval History (HAPP)

Research: History of twelfth-century Ireland spanning the conventional periodisation between pre-conquest and post-conquest Ireland. Current research projects include an edition of the charters of Strongbow (Richard de Clare, earl of Pembroke/Strigoil) relating to lands in Normandy, England, Wales, and Ireland and a study of St Thomas’s Abbey, Dublin, the only English royal monastic foundation in Ireland, drawing on two unpublished registers.

PROF PETER GRAY Professor of Modern Irish History / Director, Institute of Irish Studies (HAPP)

Reserach: I am a historian of British-Irish relations in the 19th century, especially the Great Famine of 1845-50 and its consequences and remembrance, the ‘land question’ in Irish politics, the development of the Irish poor law and welfare systems, and 19th-century British governance in Ireland in comparative context. My most recent work is a study of the Ulster agrarian radical and Chartist William Sharman Crawford.

PROF CRAWFORD GRIBBEN Professor of Early-Modern British History (HAPP)

Research: Religious radicalism in 17th-Century Britain and Ireland. Currently working on a book on ‘Ireland: A Christian History’.

PROF DAVID HAYTON Professor Emeritus of Early-Modern British and Irish History (HAPP)

Research: The political and religious history of Ireland, c.1680–1750. Currently preparing an edition of the political correspondence of the Brodrick family, 1687–1729 and researching the history of parliamentary elections in Ireland in the eighteenth century.

DR ANDREW HOLMES Lecturer in Modern Irish History (HAPP)

Research: History of Protestantism in Ulster from 1600 to present day, especially Presbyterianism. Religious history of Ireland.

PROF LIAM KENNEDY Professor Emeritus of Economic History (HAPP)

My current research interests include:

  • The Great Famine in mid-19th century Ireland
  • The ‘Troubles’ in Northern Ireland, 1966 to the present
  • Loyalist and Republican Paramilitary ‘Punishment’ Attacks, 1970 to the present,
  • Social Change in 20th century Irish Rural Society
PROF FEARGHAL McGARRY Professor of 20th Century Irish History (HAPP) / Member of IS Steering Group

Research: My research focuses on 20th century Irish history, with a particular focus on politics and culture in the revolutionary and interwar periods. I also work on historical memory, commemoration and public history, including the representation of the past in film.

PROF SEAN O'CONNELL Professor of British Social History

Research: Social history of 20th Century Britain and Northern Ireland; working class culture; consumer credit; masculinity; oral history; social history of Belfast

PROF MARY O’DOWD Professor of Gender History (HAPP)

Research: My primary research interest is in Irish gender history. History of marriage and the family. I am also beginning a new research project on the history of old age in early modern Ireland.

DR OLWEN PURDUE Lecturer in Irish Social and Economic History (HAPP)

Research: My research lies in the social and economic history of 19th and 20th-century Ireland with a particular focus on issues of social class, power and resistance. I have published on Irish urban history, poverty, welfare and public health, and landed elites. I also have a strong interest in the emergence, development and applications of Public History, particularly in regions where culture, identity, and historical narratives are contested areas.

DR EMMA REISZ Lecturer in Imperial and Asian history (HAPP)

Research: Ireland, the Irish and China in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, particularly Sir Robert Hart and the Chinese Maritime Customs; Ireland and British imperialism in Asia

Irish Language and Literature

School of Arts, English and Languages (AEL)

DR MARCAS MAC COINNIGH Lecturer in Irish and Celtic Studies (AEL)

My research focus is on:

  • Stereotypes, Stereotyping, & In-Out Group Identity
  • Language, Identity, & Conflict Resolution in Belfast and beyond.
PROF MICHEAL O MAINNIN Professor of Irish (AEL)

My principal research interests lie in the areas of linguistics (particularly onomastics); Irish and Scottish Gaelic literary texts; and Irish and Scottish identity and relations in the medieval and modern periods. He is Director of the Northern Ireland Place-Name Project (www.placenamesni.org) and has contributed two volumes (one in collaboration with Gregory Toner) to the Place-Names of Northern Ireland series.

He is currently completing his monograph on the toponymy of the plain of Macha, centred on the ecclesiastical capital of Ireland at Armagh and, closeby, Emain Macha (Navan Fort), the focal centre of Ulster kingship in the medieval period. He is also working (in collaboration with Conchúr Mag Eacháin, UCD) on providing a digitised edition of Wagner’s four-volume Linguistic Atlas and Survey of Irish Dialects for the School of Celtic Studies in the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies.

PROF GREGORY TONER Professor of Irish (AEL) / Member of IS Steering Group

Research: Greg’s research focusses primarily on medieval Gaelic literature and he is particularly interested in historiography and story, including narrative modes and cultural context. He also works on onomastics and lexicography and is editor of the electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language (eDIL).

Law

School of Law (SOL)

PROF BRICE DICKSON Professor Emeritus of International and Comparative Law (SOL) / Member of IS Steering Group

Research: I am interested in three particular aspects of the Irish legal system: (1) the performance of the Irish Supreme Court, (2) the extent to which Irish law protects human rights and (3) the respects in which the legal systems on the two parts of the island of Ireland are convergent and divergent. In 2017 I am on course to publish a book with Oxford University Press entitled The Irish Supreme Court: Historical and Comparative Perspectives.

Politics

School of History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics (HAPP)

PROF RICHARD ENGLISH Professor of Politics (HAPP); Pro-Vice Chancellor for Internationalisation and Engagement

Research: History of Irish nationalism; the IRA; political violence; the Northern Ireland Troubles; comparative terrorism

PROF YVONNE GALLIGAN Professor of Gender Politics and Head of School, HAPP Research: Gender and politics in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland
DR MUIRIS MAC CARTHAIGH Senior Lecturer in Politics (HAPP)

Research: My research broadly concerns the government and politics of the Republic of Ireland/ Irish Free State since 1922. I have authored and edited a number of books on the institutions of the Irish state, including textbooks on the government and parliament, and my post-doctoral research involved the development of the Irish State Administration Database which tracks the evolution of Irish state structures over time.  My most recent project concerns the Irish response to the economic crisis starting in 2008, with a particular focus on the public sector reform work of the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform. I am an Executive Committee member of the Political Studies Association of Ireland.

PROF CATHAL McCALL Professor of Politics (HAPP)

Research: The Irish Borderscape; cross-border cooperation as conflict transformation; Brexit and the Irish border

DR PETER McLOUGHLIN Lecturer in Politics (HAPP)

Research: Politics of Northern Ireland since the 1960s; Civil Rights; the SDLP and John Hume; the Peace Process; NI and the European Union

DR MARGARET O’CALLAGHAN Reader in Politics (HAPP) / Member of IS Steering Group

Research: Her interests are in Irish political thought, the politics of Irish literature, British high politics, the politics of commemoration and memory and modern Irish cultural and political history. She has published widely in all of these areas and has supervised over forty MA dissertations and twelve doctoral dissertations. 

  PROF GRAHAM WALKER Professor of Politics Research:

Political history and contemporary politics of Northern Ireland; Irish-Scottish Relations.

Sociology

School of Social Studies, Education and Social Work (SSESW)

PROF JOHN D. BREWER Professor of Post Conflict Studies (Mitchell Institute)

Research: I work on the Irish peace process in comparative perspective, especially in comparison to South Africa and Sri Lanka, and with respect to the sociology and psychology of peace processes, such as emotions, memory, truth recovery and atonement strategies, victim issues, and religion and civil society.

DR KATY HAYWARD Reader in Sociology (SSESW) / Member if IS Steering Group

Research: My teaching and research centre on a political sociology of the island of Ireland, with an emphasis on nationalisms, discourses and identity construction. From this point, I have explored processes of conflict and conflict transformation on the island, from micro-level interaction in contested events and spaces (e.g. Twelfth July in Ardoyne) through to the impact of European integration (e.g. cross-border cooperation). I am currently working on the potential impact of the UK exit from the EU on north/south and British/Irish relations.

DR JONATHAN HEANEY Lecturer in Sociology (SSESW)

Research: My current research, on what I am calling ‘the emotional state’, which will explore the extent to which the state is involved in the construction and symbolic legitimization of specific types of emotional life and culture (and the delegitimization of others), in areas such as education (‘emotional literacy’), social welfare, and the extent to which emotions have become a form of ‘capital’, especially in party politics. This work will look at the Irish case in a comparative context. 

DR CHERYL LAWTHER Lecturer in Criminology (Mitchell Institute)

Dr Lawther’s research interests are in the fields of transitional justice, truth recovery, victims, ex-combatants and conflict transformation.  Her article ‘Securing’ the Past: Policing and the Contest over Truth in Northern Ireland’, British Journal of Criminology, 2010, was awarded the Brian Williams Article Prize by the British Society of Criminology. Her monograph Truth, Denial and Transition: Northern Ireland and the Contested Past  was published by the Routledge Transitional Justice Series in 2014. In 2015 she was awarded an AHRC Early Career Research Grant for a project on 'Voice, Agency and Blame: Victimhood and the Imagined Community in Northern Ireland'.

Visiting Researchers 2016-17

The Institute of Irish Studies hosts Visiting Research Professors, Fellows and Associates collaborating with academics at Queen's.

CLICK HERE for information on how to apply for Visiting Researcher status.

Name Title Home Institution

Discipline and Project

Contact Period
DR CAROLYN AUGSPURGER VRF (QUB)

Politics

20th-century Ulster Unionism

caugspurger01@qub.ac.uk 2017-18
DR ELENA BERGIA VRF (QUB)

Anthropology

The construction of gender identities in nationalist working-class West Belfast; the intersections of gender with social class, political and religious affiliation, ethnicity; female paramilitary imprisonment.

Ebergia01@qub.ac.uk 2017-18
DR JON EVERSHED VRF CIEE/QUB

Anthropology
Commemoration in Northern Ireland; Decade of Centenaries; Loyalism

jevershed01@qub.ac.uk 2017-18
PROF JOHN WILSON FOSTER VRP University of British Columbia/QUB

English Literature

  1. Production of written culture from and by select Northern Irish big houses, 1850-2000.
  2. A critical biography of Lady Constance Annesley
j.foster@qub.ac.uk 2017-18
DR ALICE JOHNSON VRF Belfast Metropolitan College/QUB

History

The middle classes in nineteenth-century Belfast

alicemaryjohnson@gmail.com 2017-18
PROF WILLIAM JV NEILL VRP University of Aberdeen

Urban Planning

Planning and heritage in Belfast; contested symbolic aspects of place in societies emerging from conflict.

 b.neill@abdn.ac.uk  2017-18
PROF ROB SAVAGE VRP Boston College

History

Margaret Thatcher, the media and Ireland in the 1980s

savager@bc.edu 2017-18
           
           

Irish Studies Steering Group

The Steering Group is made of of subject and student representatives and advises the Director on the management and strategic development of Irish Studies at Queen's.

Prof Peter Gray (Chair) Irish Studies (HAPP) p.h.gray@qub.ac.uk  
Ms Cathy Devlin Irish Studies (HAPP) c.devlin@qub.ac.uk  
Dr Dominic Bryan Anthropology (HAPP) d.bryan@qub.ac.uk  
Dr Finbar McCormick  Archaeology (SNBE) f.mccormick@qub.ac.uk  
Prof Cahal McLaughlin Creative Arts (AEL) c.mclaughlin@qub.ac.uk  
Dr Graham Brownlow Economics (QMS) graham.brownlow@qub.ac.uk  
Dr Tess Maginess Education (SSESW) t.maginess@qub.ac.uk  
Prof Moyra Haslett English Literature (AEL) M.Haslett@qub.ac.uk  
Prof Keith Lilley Geography (SNBE) k.lilley@qub.ac.uk  
Prof Fearghal McGarry History (HAPP) f.mcgarry@qub.ac.uk  
Prof Greg Toner Irish Language and Literature (AEL) g.toner@qub.ac.uk  
Prof Brice Dickson Law (Law) b.dickson@qub.ac.uk  
Dr Margaret O’Callaghan Politics (HAPP) m.ocallaghan@qub.ac.uk  
Dr Katy Hayward  Sociology (SSESW) k.hayward@qub.ac.uk  
Prof Laurence Kirkpatrick Theology (IOT) ls.kirkpatrick@union.ac.uk  
Mr Gerry McLoughlin MA Representative (PGT) gmclaughlin14@qub.ac.uk  
Ms Rena Maguire Postgrad Representative (PGR) rmaguire19@qub.ac.uk  
Ms Emma Kelly Postgrad Representative (PGR) ekelly54@qub.ac.uk  

Prof Meg Harper

(University of Limerick)

External Examiner, MA Irish Studies margaret.harper@ul.ie   

Former Research Staff

For a list of our former Research Fellows in Irish Studies (1970-2011), click here: Former Staff